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Muslim community members analyze hijab

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first_imgThe Muslim Student Association of Notre Dame hosted an installment of the Prayers from around the World lecture series Tuesday evening in the Coleman-Morse Center student lounge as part of Islam Awareness Week. The event, entitled “Understanding the Hijab,” featured two speakers from the greater South Bend area who teach and practice Islam.Imam Mohammed Sirajuddin said the hijab is a concept that is found in different forms in various other faiths.“Hijab is a practice, not just when we piece off cloth that we put on our heads,” Sirajuddin said. “Hijab is the concept of modesty that exists in all other Abrahamic faith traditions. If you look at pictures of Christian and Jewish women from 100 years ago, you will find hijab.”Sirajuddin said the term hijab that the many associate with the hair covering of women is relatively new.“In the classical Islamic jurisprudence, this word itself is used many times in the Quran, but not particularly to describe the hair covering,” Sirajuddin said. “The word hijab literally means ‘screening,’ or ‘barrier.’ So it is used many times in the Quran, but not with the same meaning that we use today.”“When we say hijab, what Muslims mean is a modest dress, lowering our gazes, showing modesty towards the opposite gender, and not displaying our parts of beauty and the ornaments that could provoke the passion of the opposite gender,” Sirajuddin said.There is a similar verse in the Quran prior to the verse regarding women that pertains to men, Sirajuddin said.“The verse instructs men to lower their gaze, be modest and not to show off,” he said. “There is a modesty in the dress in men just as there is for women, but not necessarily the same requirements.”Sirajuddin said the connection between prayer and everyday life makes the debate about the proper time for hijab unimportant in the Muslim faith.“Inside the prayer, there is a consensus that covering parts of body, especially your hair and your head, is an obligation,” Sirajuddin said. “In the ritual prayer that Muslims offer five times a day, it isn’t controversial, but in the classical Muslim jurisprudence, you don’t find any difference between having hijab during prayer and having it outside of prayer.”Sirajuddin said the controversy about hijab inside the Islamic community is a byproduct of society.“This question of whether hijab is an obligation or whether it is a suggestion for Muslim women is a product of our times,” Sirajuddin said. “We see toward the Islamic tradition and in the Muslim jurisprudence that there has never been a dispute about this issue of modest dress for Muslim women.“All qualified Islamic scholars throughout history agree on the obligation of hijab. It is not a religious symbol, it is not a cultural symbol to differentiate between Muslim and non-Muslim women, rather it is a dress code ordained by law on Muslim women.”The event’s second speaker, Jamille Jojo, said the choice to cover her hair and practice hijab was an easy one.“My father came to me, he showed me the verse in the Quran, and he asked what I thought,” Jojo said. “I said, ‘okay.’ The next day, with God as my witness, I covered my hair and I continue to do so. “Jojo said her consistency is as much as a character trait as it is a dedication to her faith.“I’m not a halfway kind of person,” she said. “If I’m going to learn something I’m going to learn it to the maximum that I can. If I’m going to have a slice of pie, it’s going to be a good slice. So why wouldn’t I take that same approach with my faith?”Jojo said she covers her hair simply because it is what she has been asked to do.“It wasn’t because I’m now going to be a women’s liberator,” Jojo said. “It wasn’t because I wanted to stand out in a crowd. It’s not because I want people to come up and ask me why I’m covering my hair. I covered it specifically because its what God tells me to do in the Quran.”Jojo said there is a modesty requirement for both men and women within Islam, but they are different because of the nature of the male and female body.“For women, to be honest, their hands and their face can be shown because a woman is a sexual being by definition,” Jojo said. “A man, on the other hand, could be shirtless, and nobody is going to say a word. He has to wear a pant above the knee or the middle of the knee, so he can’t walk around in short shorts either.“That’s just the way it is because of the way a man is versus a woman. That doesn’t make them better; it just makes them different.”Sirajuddin said hijab is commanded by God, and obeying God is central to what it means to be a Muslim.“We are Muslims, which basically means that we will submit to the will of God and obey God’s commandment, and you follow his teachings, not because of good feelings or spiritual accomplish, as a result you will have those things,” Sirajuddin said. “You do it because God commanded you to do it, and you obey God because he is God.”Tags: Muslim Student Association, Prayers from Around the Worldlast_img

University welcomes transfer students

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first_imgWhile Notre Dame welcomes thousands of freshmen in the class of 2022, a number of incoming students will be entering the University this Fall as upperclassmen.Erin Camilleri, the director of transfer enrollment, said this year the University is welcoming 173 transfer students out of 871 total applications. Of this year’s transfers, 66 are Gateway students who completed their freshman year at Holy Cross, she said.Camilleri said students are selected to participate in the Gateway program by their admissions officers.“Each year, our admissions team has students who they believe will be wonderful additions to the Notre Dame community but, for whatever reason, we’re not able to offer them admission in the first year class,” she said in an email.Students in the Gateway program attend Holy Cross College as freshmen and are guaranteed transfer to Notre Dame the following year if they maintain a GPA of 3.5 or higher. During their year at Holy Cross, Gateway students take classes at Notre Dame and have full access to its clubs and other on-campus activities.Sophomore Ryan McNelis attended Holy Cross as a Gateway student last year and will be joining the Notre Dame class of 2021 this fall.“I’m kind of the prototypical Notre Dame football dream kid. I grew up watching Rudy, my mom’s a Saint Mary’s grad,” he said. “So I always wanted to be at Notre Dame. Gateway gave me the chance to fulfill that.”McNelis said both Holy Cross and Notre Dame were helpful in preparing students for transfer.“I think pretty much the whole first year of Gateway is geared to make that transition as seamless as possible,” he said. “Freshman year, we have academic advisors at both Holy Cross and Notre Dame. Both sides do a great job of making sure your requirements are all in order.”The chance to experience campus life at Notre Dame helped the transition as well, McNelis said.“I think there’s nothing that eases [the transfer] more than being able to spend time on the campus you’re transferring to for an entire year beforehand,” he said.Sophomore Jordan Felicia, who also transferred via the Gateway program, also said he valued the opportunity to use both institutions as a resource.“It’s just really great to be able to be involved on both campuses,” he said. “I definitely encourage any future Gateway students to take full advantage.”Sophomore Siena Gruler, another Gateway transfer, said she was grateful for the special sense of community she felt with other students in the program.“We’re really close,” she said. “I know if I had gotten into Notre Dame as a first-year I wouldn’t have met the people that I met. I know I’ll be friends with them for the rest of my life.”McNelis said he is excited to complete his transition to Notre Dame this fall.“Honestly, I’m most looking forward to continuing everything I started last year,” he said. “I really feel like it is a natural progression, much more a continuation of something I’ve started than the start of something new.”Sophomore Matthew Benson, who also completed the Gateway program, said he looks forward to helping future Gateway students in their transition to Notre Dame.“I’m most excited to dive right into the Notre Dame culture. I’m also excited to give back and help these upcoming Gateways realize what an opportunity this actually is,” he said.Lauren Donahue, program director for new student engagement, said this year’s Welcome Weekend hosts a number of events geared specifically towards transfer students, including a reception dinner with University President Fr. John Jenkins and “ND Traditions 101”, a talk that aims to brief transfers on Notre Dame traditions.Donahue said the events were created to cater to the unique needs of transfer students and to help them integrate with the student body.“It takes a lot of courage to leave behind the familiarity of another institution and transition to a new institution,” she said in an email. “My hope is that all new students feel welcomed and celebrated as valuable members of the Notre Dame community.”Tags: Gateway Program, Holy Cross College, Transfer welcome weekend, Welcome Weekend 2018last_img

POLL: Should Vermont consolidate school districts?

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first_imgLawmakers take testimony on school board consolidation Tuesday ... Mar 17, 2014 ... Under the plan, school boards would be consolidated into smaller units that would govern larger groups of students. The practical effect.TAKE VERMONTBIZ.COM POLL Mar 19, 2014 ... by Anne Galloway vtdigger.org Vermonters care deeply about local schools and that passion was on display Tuesday night, as dozens of ...center_img The Legislature is considering and the Vermont State Board of Education passed a motion (at its monthly meeting March 25) to support the legislative language in H883 to consolidate school districts.The legislation would, as of July 1, 2020, eliminate all supervisory unions and reduce the number of school districts to between 45 and 55. Currently there are 46 supervisory unions and 283 districts. The two interstate school districts will not be affected.“I think it’s the most important piece of educational legislation we have seen in some time,” said State Board of Education Chair Stephan Morse. “We must provide educational opportunities to all children statewide, and this is an essential change to our educational governance system.”  Student Representative and Co-Vice Chair Lachlan Francis made a motion, seconded by Board Member Mark Perrin, that: “The Vermont State Board of Education goes on record as strongly supporting H.883. The Board believes it is time to modernize Vermont’s educational governance system so that all Vermont students are provided equitable opportunity to prosper and thrive in all Vermont schools. The Board further commits to work with the Vermont legislature and the Agency of education to fairly implement the new governance structure.” The motion passed (6-1-0). Chair Morse noted that while he doesn’t typically vote as Chairman, he strongly supports this motion. Board member Bill Mathis did not vote in favor of the motion, Margaret MacLean was not in attendance, and Morgan MacIver will be a voting member in June. The Board consists of nine voting members and one non-voting member appointed by the Governor with the advice and consent of the Senate.  Read the full H.883 bill here: http://www.leg.state.vt.us/docs/2014/bills/Intro/H-883.pdf(link is external).RELATED STORY: School board consolidation meets with considerable opposition ...last_img

Northeast Johnson County morning roundup

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first_imgPrairie Village Outlaws wrap up fifth straight lax title. A group of young lacrosse players from northeast Johnson County knocked off an undefeated squad from Lee’s Summit to earn their team its fifth straight lacrosse title. The Prairie Village Outlaws, a group of seventh and eighth grade girls, defeated Lee’s Summit in the KCMGLA championship game last week. Pictured above are Outlaws players Ella Higgins, Janie Mahaffy, Sophia Durone, Maggie Schutt, Addison Wiklund and Kelsey Walls.SM East golf qualifies for state with second-place finish in Regionals. SM East’s golf team slogged through a soggy day on the course at Brookridge Country Club as it hosted Regionals play Monday, emerging with a second-place finish that earns the Lancers a return trip to the state tournament. Blue Valley North won the Regional with a total score of 310 strokes, three fewer than SM East and SM Northwest, which tied for second. SM East sophomore Thomas Luger had an amazing outing, winning the individual title with a score of 72, three strokes better than Blake Allen of SM Northwest, who finished second.SM East soccer survives and advances in Regionals opening round. SM East’s girls soccer team found itself in an early hole to Blue Valley North in Monday’s opening round Regionals game. But the Lancers came back in the second half to tie the game at two — which is where the score stood at the end of regulation and through four periods of overtime play. SM East’s goalkeeper Emily Chisholm came up big in the penalty kicks, blocking two of Blue Valley North’s shots and helping the Lancers secure the victory. SM East will play 11-6-0 Blue Valley High School on Thursday at 7 p.m. at the SMAC.Overland Park joins Prairie Village in raising tobacco-purchase age to 21. Overland Park became the fourth city in Johnson County to join the movement to raise the age to purchase tobacco to 21 on Monday. Prairie Village followed Olathe and Lenexa to raise its tobacco age in March. [Overland Park votes to raise tobacco sales age to 21 — KMBC]SM East baseball Regionals rescheduled for Wednesday. Yesterday’s day-long rain forced the cancelation of SM East’s scheduled Regionals game against SM South. The game has been rescheduled for Wednesday at 4 p.m. at the 3&2 complex in Lenexa.National GOP convention delegate from Prairie Village. The Kansas Republican state committee picked 25 at-large spots for delegates to the national convention in July over the weekend. Among those chosen was Jared Suhn of Prairie Village. Kansas will have a total of 40 delegates at the Cleveland convention. [Kansas GOP picks 25 at-large convention delegates; Trump supporter Kobach on the list – The Kansas City Star]Roeland Park approves branding agreement. A contract with Benedictine College that had been the subject of long discussions and intense questioning was approved by the Roeland Park City Council Monday night. The branding proposal will involved students at Benedictine. The work is expected to begin as early as next month and be complete buy the end of the year.Special permit for chickens dropped in Roeland Park. The city council approved another special permit for backyard chickens Monday night, but it promises to be the last – special permit that is. The Roeland Park City Council also approved a change in animal control ordinances that removes the need for a resident wanting to raise backyard chickens to apply to the city council for a special permit. Paying fees for a license for chickens now can be done with the city clerk much like for dogs and cats.Northeast Johnson County morning roundup is brought to you by Twisted Sisters Coffee Shop on Johnson Drive. For updates on the latest blends and specialty drinks available, follow them on Facebook.last_img

HHS seeks comments on risks of H5N1 research

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first_imgOct 18, 2012 (CIDRAP News) – Federal health officials are inviting the public to weigh in on whether research on H5N1 avian influenza viruses, including strains modified in the lab to make them more transmissible, is risky enough to require new safety regulations and precautions.The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) wants to know if people think H5N1 should be designated an HHS special agent, which means that medical labs handling it would have to register with the agency and meet special requirements for physical security and personnel screening and training.The department also has asked for comments on whether special safety and containment measures are needed for research involving H5N1 strains with increased transmissibility in mammals. The request follows the publication earlier this year of two controversial studies describing genetically modified H5 strains that were capable of aerosol transmission in ferrets.HHS published its request for comments yesterday in a 16-page Federal Register notice. The public has 60 days to comment.Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 viruses are already listed as select agents in the US Department of Agriculture's (USDA's) province of the Select Agent Program, which means that labs that handle them must register with the USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) and meet related security and screening requirements. But the viruses are not on HHS's select agent list.Oversight by APHIS "focuses on the threat to animal health and safety," the HHS notice says. "Listing influenza viruses that contain an HA [hemagglutinin] from the goose/Guangdong/1/96 lineage [the first highly pathogenic H5N1 isolate identified] as an HHS select agent will ensure that the focus of regulation will also be on the potential impact of these viruses on human health as well as agriculture."The notice notes that certain other agents, such as Bacillus anthracis, which causes anthrax, are on both the USDA and HHS select agent lists. Adding H5N1 to the HHS list "may help to ensure that HPAI strains that have the greatest potential for major direct effects on human health will be regulated with a focus on protection of human health," it states.The request for comments follows a determination by a federal interagency committee that H5N1 viruses may pose a severe threat to human health and safety, according to the notice. The finding came from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Intragovernmental Select Agents and Toxins Technical Advisory Committee (ISATTAC), which includes members from various HHS and USDA agencies and the departments of Homeland Security and Defense.That committee considered "the data showing transmissibility of genetically modified H5N1 viruses among ferrets," along with the virus's virulence and the low level of immunity in the population.The panel also recognized that H5N1 research could lead to better preparedness for pandemic flu and therefore said the risks inherent in research must be weighed against any negative effects that new restrictions might have on legitimate research, according to the notice.HHS is asking for opinions not only on H5N1 as a possible select agent, but also on whether it should be a "Tier 1" select agent, a new category for agents thought to pose the greatest risk of misuse leading to major harm. Tier 1 agents require additional precautions, such as greater physical security and "personal reliability" screening for staff who work with them.Both the USDA and HHS recently revised their lists of select agents. The USDA kept H5N1 on its list but did not designate the virus as a Tier 1 agent. HHS put several agents in the Tier 1 category, including Ebola and Marburg viruses and the agents that cause smallpox, plague, anthrax, and botulism, among others."The final determination of whether or not to designate this particular lineage of H5N1 HPAI as Tier 1 would be a collaborative process between HHS and USDA," the Federal Register notice says. "HHS and USDA would continue to work closely together whether or not both HHS and USDA designate these viruses as Tier 1 Select Agents."Further questions in the HHS notice include:Should special safety and biocontainment measures be considered when working with diagnostic specimens suspected of containing HPAI H5N1?Should even more stringent precautions be used when working with HPAI H5 strains that have increased transmissibility in mammals?In response to queries from CIDRAP News, comments from groups and researchers likely to be affected by an HHS move to make H5N1 a select agent suggest there's a lot of uncertainty about the implications of the HHS notice.Chris N. Mangal, MPH, director of public health preparedness and response at the Association of Public Health Laboratories, said, "APHL has concerns about HPAI H5 viruses being included on the new tier 1 list of select agents. These viruses are already regulated by the US Department of Agriculture. In the coming weeks, APHL will be gathering more information from member public health laboratories to better address the questions posed in the Oct 17 Federal Register notice."Richard J. Webby, PhD, whose lab at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis studies H5N1 viruses and is registered with the USDA Select Agent Program, commented, "To be honest it's not entirely clear what the impact of such a decision would be on operations here but it's something that we are of course investigating fully now." Webby directs the World Health Organization Collaborating Center for Studies on the Ecology of Influenza in Animals and Birds, which is at St. Jude.John J. Treanor, MD, a veteran flu and flu vaccine researcher at the University of Rochester, commented, "I don't work directly with H5 viruses in the lab, but I am sure that this [issue] will be quite controversial. It is probably a consequence of the earlier issues related to the ferret studies. It's a tough call—increasing restrictions will without any doubt make it more difficult to study H5 viruses and if the new regulations required specialized facilities that are not readily available, could substantially reduce research in this area."On the other hand, H5 viruses are potentially very dangerous. I would see a question—do H5 viruses pose greater danger in the form of natural emergence of H5 as an epidemic in humans, in which case increasing containment requirements is counterproductive, or do H5 viruses pose a danger to humans primarily because of possible accidental release, in which case increased containment is very important."See also: Oct 17 HHS Federal Register noticeOct 10 CIDRAP News story "Changes in select agent rules concern public health labs"Jun 21 CIDRAP News story "Fouchier study reveals changes enabling airborne spread of H5N1 virus"last_img

Rotary: Galen Gisler On Threat Of Near-Earth Asteroids

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first_imgDr. Galen Gisler, retired LANL astrophysicist and community volunteer, recently spoke at the Rotary Club of Los Alamos about the threat of near-Earth asteroids. He described the impacts of the Chicxulub impact in present-day Yucatan that is responsible for the extinction of the dinosaurs 65 million years ago, as well as those impacts in our modern age: Tunguska, Siberia in 1908 and Chelyabinsk, Russia in 2013. To study the threat, scientists find potentially hazardous asteroids, calculate their orbits, monitor and characterize them, and if necessary, develop and execute a deflection mission. The intent of the deflection is to alter the asteroid’s orbit away from Earth. Methods considered include a gravity tractor, kinetic impact, a nuclear explosive device, and a spacecraft swarm with lasers, ion beams, or solar mirrors. For more information, visit the Minor Planet Center, www.minorplanetcenter.net, which operates at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. Photo by Linda Hulllast_img

Going places: 17.04.2009

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Linde Pakistan Limited – A new era for BOC Pakistan

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first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

Major ASU order for Hangzhou Hangyang

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Iwatani acquires Advanced Specialty Gases

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first_imgThe acquisition of the Nevada-based company marks Iwatani’s entry into the US speciality gases market.Advanced Speciality Gases serves a wide range of industries including electric utilities, semiconductor, mobility and chemicals. Company products include speciality and rare gases as well as complex mixtures.“Iwatani was a natural fit for our family to transition ownership to,” said David Stein, Owner and President of Advanced Speciality Gases.“Iwatani will continue to invest in the business to grow, expand its product offerings and bring enhanced value propositions to customers.”“Over the past 20 years, Advanced Speciality Gases has earned a solid reputation and built exceptional business and talented team,” said Joe Cappello, CEO of Iwatani Americas.Iwatani makes Joseph S. Cappello appointment“The business is a great platform for Iwatani to extend its global capabilities to serve customers in strong and growing markets and we are very pleased that Brian Hamilton, who has been an integral part of Advanced Specialty Gases since its inception, has been named General Manager and will lead the team forward.”Financial terms of the transaction were not disclosed.Specialty Gas ZoneFor all the latest news, views, and analysis of the high-growth global specialty gases business, bookmark the dedicated Specialty Gases Zone.Includes market reports, heavyweight interviews, profiles of who’s-who in specialty gases, and further reading items.www.gasworld.com/zoneslast_img