Category: hofumalqohsy

Conboy outlines strategic plan through 2024

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first_imgIn a Monday email, Saint Mary’s President Katie Conboy outlined her strategic plan for the College, titled Reading and Writing Saint Mary’s: Creating the Path to 2024.“In the midst of our current operating conditions, we must keep our eyes on our future — a future that will be inspired by your strength,” Conboy said in the email. “What can Saint Mary’s do today to ensure that we come out stronger in the post-COVID environment?”Conboy acknowledged the uncertainties associated with the ongoing pandemic facing the situation with a “shortened planning horizon and an expedited planning process.”The strategic plan is divided into five phases with phase one — analysis and synthesis — starting immediately, and the final phase — expansion, growth and evolution — being implemented mid-November and continuing for the next two years. The other three phases include writing the future: story and design, delivery and commitment to action.Conboy concluded the email by inviting students to partake in a survey to contribute their feedback and ideas for the strategic planning process.Tags: 2024, president katie conboy, strategic planlast_img

Cardinals’ Southland slump continues at SE Louisiana

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first_imgLamar sports informationHAMMOND, La. – Carson Lance had his longest outing on the mound this season, but the Lamar baseball team was not able to back him Saturday when it fell to Southeastern Louisiana 4-1 and dropped the Southland Conference series at Pat Kenelly Stadium.Lance lasted 7 2/3 innings against the Lions (14-4, 5-0 Southland), his longest outing of the year by two innings. He gave up all four of Southeastern’s runs Saturday on four hits and three walks, but he helped save a Cardinals (10-10, 0-5) bullpen that had to run through four relievers Friday night.SLU’s starter Corey Gaconi hurled nine innings with just one run allowed in the game, which was Cutter McDowell’s leadoff home run to right field. Gaconi worked around six hits and walked none. Brett Brown took over for Lance on the hill with two outs in the seventh. He tossed seven pitches in a walk to Sanders and strikeout of Brennan Breaud.Russell and DeVore led the Cardinals with two hits apiece in LU’s six-hit outing. McDowell and Coker collected the other two. Russell was 2-of-4 and DeVore was 2-of-3. Robin Adames was held off the bags for the first time since the 2016 season. His 27-game reached base streak was snapped.The Cardinals will try to avoid the sweep today at 1 p.m. when the two teams square off again. Jace Campbell (1-1, 3.86 earned run average) will get the ball on the mound for Lamar. It will be his fourth start of the season in as many weekends. Next UpThree of LU’s base hits were in the sixth inning, in which the Cardinals left the bases loaded at that time down 3-1. Grant DeVore led off the inning with a bunt single and took second on Cole Coker’s one-out single to right field. Reid Russell followed Coker with an infield single, but Gaconi survived with a fly out and strikeout.McDowell’s home run was the 12th time that LU has scored in the first inning this season, but only the fourth time it’s lost in those games. He took two balls and a strike before he unloaded on the fourth pitch of the at-bat.Reigning Louisville Slugger National Hitter of the Week Taylor Schwarner gave the Lions the 2-1 advantage in the bottom of the first with a double to left that chased home Carson Crites and Drew Avans. Schwarner added another in the bottom of the third when he lifted a sacrifice fly for Ryan Byers.Byers chased home Scottie Sanders on a double to right field, two batters after Sanders himself doubled.last_img

Death with Dignity’ signed into law in Vermont

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first_imgby Alicia Freese May 20, 2013 vtdigger.org A decade of lengthy and divisive debate ended Monday when Vermont became the first state in the US to enact legislation allowing terminally ill patients to obtain medication to help them end their lives.In a room jam-packed with lawmakers and supporters of the so-called physician-assisted death bill, Gov. Peter Shumlin signed into law S77, which takes effect immediately.Sen. Dick McCormack, left, and Dick Walters, president of Patients Choice Vermont, greet supporters of a bill allowing physician-assisted death in Vermont. Photo by Alicia Freese/VTDiggerThe bill grants doctors civil and criminal immunity if they follow a series of required steps before prescribing a lethal dose of medication to a patient with a life expectency of fewer than six months who requests it. The steps include ascertaining that the patient is capable of making the decision and can self-administer the medicine. The requirements expire after three years, by which point lawmakers hope doctors will have developed their own guidelines.Shumlin told the crowd, ‘This bill does not compel anyone to do anything that they don’t choose in sound mind to do. All it does is give those who are facing terminal illness, are facing excruciating pain, a choice in a very carefully regulated way.’Shumlin and House Speaker Shap Smith praised lawmakers for positioning themselves at the vanguard of ‘patient choice.’Oregon and Washington passed similar laws through referendums and a court decision prompted a law in Montana, but Vermont is the first state to pass the measure through the legislative process.Attorney General Bill Sorrell predicted that court action could compel other states to follow in Vermont’s footsteps. ‘Quite frankly I see litigation in the future. This could be the next, or a next, big civil rights issue,’Sorrell said.Sorrell said that like race and gender orientation issues, he expects the tide of changing public opinion ‘propelled by aging baby boomers ‘will prompt the Supreme Court to act on the issue. ‘I see this being another of those civil rights where the mood in the country changes and the judiciary will follow suit.’The president of Patients Choice Vermont, Dick Walters, who spearheaded an 11-year push for the legislation, said in a statement, ‘Vermont has taken a huge step forward for the autonomy rights of terminally ill patients.’Health care systems weigh the implicationsVermont hospitals are not jumping on board just yet, however. S.77 gives health care facilities the option of prohibiting their staff from prescribing a lethal dose of medicine to patients who are staying at the facility.And most hospitals will take advantage of that option, at least in the short term, according to Jill Olson, vice president of policy and legislative affairs for the Vermont Association of Hospitals and Health Systems (VAHHS).Fletcher Allen ‘the state’s largest hospital ‘informed its staff Friday that it is enacting an interim policy to prohibit the practice for patients on its premises.That policy will stand until the Ethics Committee and hospital leadership has had a chance to work through the ‘unique issues from an ethical standpoint’that the legislation poses, according to chief medical officer, Dr. Stephen Leffler.Olson said the quick turnaround ‘the Legislature passed the bill on May 13, and Shumlin signed it one week later, making it effective immediately ‘is leading many hospitals to prohibit the practice.‘I’m certain that we’ll have many [hospitals and health facilities] that use the exemption because of the quick implementation time frame,’Olson said.Even two weeks, Olson said, would have allowed hospitals to consult their ethics committees ahead of time.Sen. Claire Ayer and Bob Ullrich, an active proponent of physician-assisted death, talk after Gov. Peter Shumlin signed into law a bill allowing terminally ill patients to obtain a lethal dose of medication. Photo by Alicia Freese/VTDiggerBut Sen. Claire Ayer, D-Addison, who played a key role shepherding S.77 into law, said the quick turnaround was necessary for procedural reasons. Normally, a bill has to sit in the Senate for 24 hours after passing. With S.77, the legislative session would have ended before the clock ran out. The only way to expedite the process was to have the governor to request the bill, but when he makes that sort of request, he has to sign the bill within five legislative days. Ayer said they chose not to delay the effective date within the bill itself because ‘there are people who want it now, and they’ve been here day after day hoping that when its time for them they’ll have that option.’Health Commissioner Harry Chen said he doesn’t think the hesitancy among hospitals will be a setback because it’s unlikely that hospital patients will avail themselves of this option. Chen said information from Oregon shows most people who take the prescription do so at home.Opponents refocus their effortsScattered among the law’s jubilant supporters was a somewhat sparser crowd that’s also been omnipresent at the Statehouse during the debate over the bill. Opponents of the legislation, each identified by a round orange sticker, said they resented the event’s festive atmosphere given the risks that accompany the law.Mary Hahn Beerworth, a member of Vermont Right to Life, said, ‘I think they have a nerve being here today, having a party and celebrating when they have just floated vulnerable Vermonters out there at serious risk at feeling pressured into asking and requesting for a lethal dose of medication and then being bullied into taking it.’After today, supporters and opponents are both pivoting their attention away from the Legislature and toward providing the public with information.The Vermont Medical Society, which lobbied against the bill, is now focusing its efforts on telling physicians what they need to know about S.77. There are 15 steps doctors have to follow if they’re to receive civil and legal immunity, according to VMS executive director Paul Harrington.‘We are basically trying to let physicians know their responsibilities if they choose to prescribe a lethal medication,’he said.The Department of Health will also be distributing information regarding the requirements.True Dignity Vermont is taking a different tack. Carrie Handy, a board member for the anti-assisted suicide group, said they are refashioning the advocacy shop as a watchdog organization. They are launching a hotline for people to report abuse ‘opponents are concerned that vulnerable adults will be pressured to request a prescription ‘and they have plans to start a registry of ‘‘safe’doctors, nursing homes and other health care providers.’‘There are a couple of physicians who have come out strongly in favor of this legislation. Obviously they would not be on our registry. We hope to be able to get physicians on record saying they would not participate,’Handy said.Chen said one of the potential ‘silver linings’of S.77 is that it will spur conversations between patient and doctors about end-of-life decisions, and a ‘safe doctors’registry could discourage that.‘I’m not sure it really serves any purpose other than putting off having those conversations,’Chen said.On the other side of the issue, Patients Choice Vermont plans to retool itself to provide information to people interested in the option of obtaining a lethal prescription.last_img

Barclays breach leads roundup

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first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Bank Confirms Customer Info Compromisedby. Jeffrey RomanIn this week’s breach roundup, Barclays is investigating a breach that affected certain customers of its now-defunct financial planning business. Also, a St. Louis, Mo., man has been sentenced for his role in a cyber-attack on a Koch Industries subsidiary website.Barclays Customer Data StolenBarclays is investigating a breach that affected certain customers of its now-defunct Barclays Financial Planning business.The UK-based financial institution is aware of up to 2,000 client files that were compromised in the incident, according to a spokesperson.News of the incident was first reported by the Daily Mail, which said that up to 27,000 files were leaked from the company and sold to rogue traders. That number is “unsubstantiated,” the Barclays spokesperson says.Compromised information includes names, addresses and other personal details, according to Barclays. The Daily Mail reported exposed data may include customer earnings, savings, mortgages, health issues and insurance policies. continue reading »last_img

Psychology researchers map neurological process of learning and deciding

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first_imgScientists at The University of Texas at Austin can now map what happens neurologically when new information influences a person to change his or her mind, a finding that offers more insight into the mechanics of learning.The study, which was published Nov. 1 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, examined how dynamic shifts in a person’s knowledge are updated in the brain and impact decision making.“At a fundamental level, it is difficult to measure what someone knows,” said co-author and psychology associate professor Alison Preston. “In our new paper, we employ brain decoding techniques that allow us deeper insight into the knowledge people have available to make decisions. We were able to measure when a person’s knowledge changes to reflect new goals or opinions.” LinkedIn Pinterest Share on Twitter Emailcenter_img Share on Facebook Share The process, researchers said, involves two components of the brain working together to update and “bias” conceptual knowledge with new information to form new ideas.“How we reconcile that new information with our prior knowledge is the essence of learning. And, understanding how that process happens in the brain is the key to solving the puzzle of why learning sometimes fails and how to put learning back on track,” said the study’s lead author Michael Mack, who was a postdoctoral researcher in the Center for Learning & Memory.In the study, researchers monitored neural activity while participants learned to classify a group of images in two different ways. First participants had to learn how to conceptualize the group of images, or determine how the images were similar to each other based on similar features. Once they grouped the images, participants were then asked to switch their attention to other features within the images and group them based on these similarities instead.“By holding the stimuli constant and varying which features should be attended to across tasks, the features that were once relevant become irrelevant, and the items that were once conceptually similar may become very different,” said Preston, who holds a joint faculty appointment in neuroscience.For example, the researchers report that many Americans may have chosen their preferred presidential candidate many months ago based on political platforms or core issues. But as the election cycle continued, voters were presented with new information, influencing some to change their perspectives on the candidates and, potentially, their votes.This requires rapid updating of conceptual representations, a process that occurs in the hippocampi (HPC)–two seahorse-shaped areas near the center of the brain responsible for recording experiences, or episodic memory–researchers said. It’s also one of the first areas to suffer damage in Alzheimer’s disease.According to the study, the prefrontal cortex (PFC) — the front part of the brain that orchestrates thoughts and actions — tunes selective attention to relevant features and compares that information with the existing conceptual knowledge in the HPC, updating the organization of items based on the new relevant features, researchers said.“Looking forward, our findings place HPC as a central component of cognition — it is the brain’s code builder. I think these findings will motivate future research to consider the more general-purpose function of the hippocampus,” said Mack, who is now an assistant professor of psychology at the University of Toronto. “For example, understanding how we dynamically update conceptual knowledge may be essential to understanding how biases and prejudices are coded into our views of other people.”These findings add to the growing, though limited, body of literature on the function of the HPC beyond episodic memory by providing direct evidence of its role, in concert with the PFC, in building conceptual knowledge.“With an understanding of the mechanics of learning, we can develop educational practices and training protocols that optimally engage the brain’s learning circuits to build lasting knowledge,” Mack said.last_img

The Wheel Group Announces Changes To Leadership

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first_imgAdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisementWheel Group Holdings LLC (TWG), a global aftermarket wheel, tire and automotive accessory supplier, has announced several changes to its leadership team. The company said these changes in leadership are part of a strategic plan to continue the growth and advancement of the company as a valued industry leader.Philip “Billy” Young will retire as CEO of TWG. Young founded the company nearly 20 years ago and built the company into what it is today. With a diverse sourcing background and unsurpassed understanding of Asian manufacturing and supply, it became Young’s vision to create a truly global company that would deliver high-quality products with a just-in-time distribution model worldwide. Young will remain with the organization and serve as chairman on its Board of Directors.David Williams has been named as CEO. Williams has been with TWG for 17 years and most recently served as president of the organization. His background in sales, strategy and planning along with regional wholesale distribution gives Williams a solid foundation in all areas of the business. Williams will be instrumental to the growth and development of the company and as it increases market share and its brand portfolio.AdvertisementPaul Yang has been promoted to the role of chief operating officer. He has been with TWG for 14 years, most recently in the role of executive vice president. Yang has led the finance and operations areas of the company for more than a decade and will expand his role to include emerging technologies as they apply to streamlined efficiencies throughout all operational aspects of the organization.,Lubrication Specialties Inc. (LSI), manufacturer of Hot Shot’s Secret brand of performance additives and oils, recently announced the expansion of senior leadership. Steve deMoulpied joins LSI as the company’s chief operating officer (COO). AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement LSI President Brett Tennar says, “Steve’s success in developing operational strategies that improves the bottom line, builds teamwork, reduces waste and ensures quality product development and distribution checks many of the boxes of what we were looking for in a COO. This, coupled with his career in the Air Force working with highly technical systems and his in-depth understanding of Lean Six Sigma and Business Process Management sealed our offer. As our tagline states, our products are Powered by Science. This data driven approach is one reason why our company has grown exponentially as we employ the most advanced technology to product development. I am confident that Steve is the right person to drive operational strategy for our diverse and growing brands.” Advertisement DeMoulpied comes to LSI from the Private Client Services practice of Ernst & Young where he managed strategy & operations improvement engagements for privately held client businesses. Some of his prior roles include VP of strategic development, director of strategic initiatives, and Lean Six Sigma Master Black Belt at OptumHealth, UnitedHealth Group’s health services business, as well as Lean Six Sigma Black Belt at General Electric, where he applied operations improvement principles to customer service, supply chain and product development. A successful entrepreneur, deMoulpied is also the founder of PrestoFresh, a Cleveland-based e-commerce food/grocery business.  DeMoulpied has a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering Management from the United States Air Force Academy and a Master of Business Administration degree from the University of Dayton in Marketing and International Business. He served six years with the USAF overseeing the development of technology used on fighter aircraft and the E-3 Surveillance aircraft, finishing his career honorably as Captain. With more than 20 years of experience across multiple industries and functional areas, deMoulpied has particular expertise in organizations with complex technical products. Combined, his prior positions have required a spectrum of skills in corporate strategy, operations improvement, product quality, and revenue cycle management. He has an impressive history of utilizing data driven problem solving (Lean Six Sigma) and project management (PMP and CSM) to achieve strategic goals surrounding customer satisfaction, operational efficiency and improved profit. last_img

Nordana Sea to set sail

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first_imgNordana Sea is an ecobox-design vessel, which Ferus Smit says is characterised by its flexibility of loading, combined with very economical and ecological performance.With an overall length of 122.5 m, the 10,500 dwt ship features a large box-shaped hold, as well as a large loading floor area with a moveable tweendeck for project cargoes, and two 85-tonne capacity cranes. HLPFI reported in June 2015 that the second vessel, Nordana Star, was being launched in Leer in July 2015; while the first ship - Nordana Sky - was launched in February 2015.The final three vessels - Nordana Sun, Nordana Spirit and Nordana Space - are scheduled for delivery in July 2016, October 2017 and June 2018 respectively, according to Symphony Shipping. Cranes being installed on board Nordana Sea at the Ferus Smit shipyard in Leer. www.ferus-smit.nlwww.nordana.comwww.symphonyshipping.comlast_img

Ceva boosts freighter capacity

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first_imgOperating on behalf of customers in the automotive, aerospace, computer and hi-tech electronics sectors, the charters are designed to prevent production lines from stopping and to provide urgent stock replenishment amid the Covid-19 outbreak.Ceva has already completed more than 58 flights, with 28 more scheduled in the coming weeks.The majority of eastbound flights originated in Shanghai or Hong Kong and were destined for Chicago in the USA.www.cevalogistics.comlast_img

LYME DISEASE – DON’T ‘TICK’ THE BOXES

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first_imgInfected Bite“There are some simple steps we can take to reduce the risk of developing Lyme disease from an infected tick.  You should wear long trousers tucked into socks and long sleeves when you are in heavy undergrowth and use insect repellents like DEET or Permethrin.  If you are planning to spend lots of time outdoors in risky areas you can get clothing that has been treated with Permethrin. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedIn So the message is clear – enjoy the outdoors but take sensible precautions unless you want to have something unpleasant in common with Avril, Ben, Richard and Yolanda. “If you can’t cover up then please remember to check your body and clothing for ticks whenever you leave a risky area.  Before they bite ticks can easily be brushed off but once they attach themselves they must be removed using special tick removers, thread loops or fine pointed tweezers.” Public Health Specialty Registrar Andrew Rideout has some good advice for anyone taking to the great outdoors and who might encounter ticks on their travels.  He said:  “With the good weather we’ve been having now is a great time to enjoy the fantastic outdoor opportunities that Dumfries and Galloway is famous for.center_img What do Richard Gere, Avril Levigne, Ben Stiller and Yolanda Foster have in common?  As well as talent, fame and wealth these unfortunate celebrities are just some of the high profile people who suffer from Lyme disease. “There are so many reasons to go outside from adrenaline sports like mountain biking and kayaking to more sedate pastimes like fishing or photography.  Regular outdoor exercise is great for our physical and mental health but it is important to take care in the countryside. Lyme disease is caused by a bacteria carried by some ticks which they can pass on to humans and animals when they deliver a painless bite.  Ticks are tiny pinhead size creatures from the spider family that live in grass and bushes.Once they latch on to a human or animal they feed on blood for several days, swelling to the size of a pea before dropping off to complete their life cycle.  Early signs of infection can include a spreading red rash and feeling generally unwell with flu-like symptoms.At this stage a course of antibiotics can stop the infection getting any worse.  So if you have a tick attached, particularly if it has been there for more than 24 hours, and you develop a rash around the bite, feel feverish and weak or if you develop flu like symptoms you should see a GP or visit the Emergency Department as soon as possible to start treatment.last_img

Enhanced role for community pharmacists (COVID-19)

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first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInPharmacists empowered to help more patients during COVID-19 outbreak. Community pharmacists are to perform an enhanced role during the Coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak.Pharmacists will be able to support more patients, reducing the pressure on other parts of NHS Scotland through the extension of the Minor Ailment Service.The Scottish Government has also accelerated plans to expand access to Emergency Care Summary (ECS) data, which mainly contains medication information, to pharmacists.Health Boards have been asked to provide access to this information to pharmacists and pharmacy technicians working in communities.More than a thousand community pharmacies provide a range of NHS Pharmaceutical Care services on behalf of the NHS in Scotland.Health Secretary Jeane Freeman said:“The vital work of community pharmacies up and down the country is key in ensuring that we continue to reduce the burden across the NHS, and patients continue to get the necessary medicines they need to stay healthy.“Many people visit a community pharmacy every day, with these numbers increasing in the current COVID-19 outbreak.“This makes them the most accessible healthcare professionals on the front line of community health services, and a valuable resource to NHS Scotland.“Strengthening the role of pharmacists, and easing some of the pressure from frontline NHS services, is therefore an important step in our wide ranging response to the current crisis.”last_img