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SMC Theatre Dept. performs adaptation of Greek myth

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first_imgBy MADELINE MILES and REBECCA O’NEIL News Writers Saint Mary’s Theatre Department offered audience members a new twist on an ancient myth with its rendition of Sarah Ruhl’s “Eurydice,” which opened Thursday night at the College’s Little Theatre. The play is based on the classic Greek tale of lyrist Orpheus’ attempt to rescue his lover from Hades. Ruhl’s adaptation turns the story around and presents it from the perspective of the fallen lover. Theatre professor Katie Sullivan, who directed the play, said Ruhl’s adaptation gives theatre goers a unique experience of the story. “I am fascinated by her technique of sketching the story in broad, poetic strokes,” Sullivan said. “Ruhl leaves it to music, sound, movement and visual imagery to fill in the nuances and to make us feel the experience of the play.” The reimagining, Sullivan said, refreshes the story while staying true to its original message. “Primarily, though, the play resonates with the age-old message that love will always be what we must hold onto and that loss is, indeed, life’s most exquisite pain,” she said. The play’s ensemble was drawn from Notre Dame, Holy Cross and Saint Mary’s students. Senior theatre major Eva Cavadini led the cast as Eurydice; history professor Bill Svelmoe plays her father; Orpheus is played by Notre Dame freshman Kincaid Schmitz and the Lord of the Underworld is played by Holy Cross junior Nick DeDario. Kincaid said his first play at the Little Theatre was worthwhile. “It was difficult to get emotionally ready for it,” he said. “[The best part] is the wonderful cast I’ve gotten to work with. I think I’ll do another [play] here.” Sullivan said the play elicits a variety of reactions from different viewers. “You may find yourself laughing, crying or being caught up in the strange and beautiful visual imagery we have created for our Underworld,” she said. The effects that went into the Underworld and other scenes made the tech day during which rehearsals are done with full costume, props, sets and effects especially difficult, Svelmoe said. “It was the most technically complicated show I’ve ever been in,” he said. “We had four tech days and probably put in a total of 25 hours into coordinating our movements with special effects.” First year Tessa Mitchell, part of the play’s “chorus of stones,” said the fulfillment of the final product outweighed the demands of the stage. “It was hard work and stressful, but definitely worth it,” she said. “It’s so great to see it come to fruition on stage.” Junior Dilan Yuksel said she appreciated the play’s altered point of view. “It was definitely cool to see the other side of the myth of Orpheus and Eurydice,” she said. “It was a really interesting play. I really enjoyed it.” The play will be performed tonight and tomorrow at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday at 2:30 p.m. at the Little Theatre.last_img

Saint Mary’s announces 12th president

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first_imgSouth Bend native Jan Cervelli was introduced to the Saint Mary’s community Wednesday afternoon as the 12th president of the College.Cervelli said she grew up across the St. Joseph River and it has been a “wonderful homecoming” to be back in the community.Caitlyn Jordan | The Observer “God has taken me on so many great journeys, and he brought me back here for the greatest purpose of all,” she said.Cervelli said she is not the only one thrilled to be back home; her mother, a resident of Granger, said she is happy to have Jan back in the area. Cervelli said she has been running into classmates and neighbors since she has been back and has received a tremendous amount of support from the community.Cervelli attended Holy Cross grade school and Saint Joseph High School in South Bend. Her sister, Patricia, is a Saint Mary’s alumna and member of the class of 1972. Cervelli chose Purdue because of her interest in architecture, though she would have liked to attend Saint Mary’s, she said.“I’ve always appreciated the seamlessness about spirituality and subjects taught [in Holy Cross education],” she said. “The spiritual dimension gives much more meaning and depth to the education.”Coming from a background of larger universities, Cervelli is leaving a position as dean of the College of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Architecture and professor of landscape architecture at the University of Arizona.She said the smaller school atmosphere is exciting because of the sense of intimacy, the strong connection to students and she cited the 10:1 student-to-professor ratio at the College as a testament to how Saint Mary’s fully engages students in the classroom.She also said her experience in landscape architecture, which is taught in a small studio settings, lends itself well to her understanding of how learning happens in a more intimate setting.Prior to her work at the University of Arizona, Cervelli served as the first female dean at Clemson University when she was selected as its dean of the College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities, according to a College press release.  She has also served as associate dean for Undergraduate Studies and director of the Teaching and Learning Center at the University of Kentucky.Cervelli said she recognizes the importance of interdisciplinary connections that can be made to make the educational environment even richer at the College.She said her first priorities as president of the College are getting to know the staff, faculty and students.“I want to be able to have strong conversations and spend time understanding from the student perspective,” she said. “I like to call it a listening tour.”Additionally, Cervelli said she wantd to immerse herself into student life at the College.“I want to become a part of the class of 2020,” she said. “ … I want to be able to walk the walk with students and see what it’s like to take classes, to live in the dorm, to eat the food.”Her next priority is to get to know the alumnae around the country, Cervelli said.“Saint Mary’s has fabulous alumnae, who are super accomplished and well connected, so I’m looking forward to getting to know people and allowing people to get to know me,” she said.Cervelli plans to build on the partnerships with Holy Cross institutions including Notre Dame and Holy Cross and to invite the community at large to campus in a highly visible way, she said.“Saint Mary’s is so modest,” she said. “It’s a real strength and a wonderful quality; on the same token, [we] need to brag a little bit more, so I’d like to work with the staff here to look at how we can make our mark on the world and share our accomplishments.”Cervelli hopes to help create a more sustainable campus using her professional background and expertise.“I’m very interested in looking at the campus itself, as a landscape architect and how can we begin to design, redesign and look to the future of development that makes the campus sustainable,” she said.She said many students are interested in issues of sustainability today and she believes the leadership of the students could help to guide that discussion.Cervelli said she will bring a few pets to South Bend from Arizona and looks forward to reconnecting with her childhood friends. Emphasizing the importance of balance in her life, Cervelli cited some of her interests outside of her academic career.“I have been in rock bands since I was in high school,” Cervelli said. “I had the chance to join a band and tour in college, but I knew that my parents wouldn’t be very happy.”Although she most often performed as a singer, Cervelli said she can also play guitar and the keyboard.She said she gave up music between graduate school and her career as a professor and dean but later picked up the hobby again.“When I got to Arizona, one of the faculty in Architecture heard that I used to do music … so we got together with some graduate students, played guitar and jammed. We put together a band that would play at events for the University and other events in downtown Tucson.”Cervelli while she derives a sense of balance from music, she places value on all activities that provide it to students.“The wellness of students is important to me,” she said, and the renovation of Angela Athletic Facility will be crucial to that wellness and helping students to live a balanced lifestyle.Cervelli said her passion for students, music and wellness will dovetail nicely into her role as the president.“It’s in college where you begin to learn that balance,” she said. “All leaders should demonstrate how to live that balance.”She will also institute an open door policy when she takes office, June 1.“I want students to know that I have an open door,” Cervelli said. “I will drop what I have to because I know that if a student is coming, then it’s important.”Tags: Jan Cervelli, Janice Cervelli, new president, saint mary'slast_img

President Patton points to Middlebury’s ‘Determined, Engaged Optimism’ in inaugural address

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first_imgby Robert Keren/Middlebury College Middlebury opened a new chapter in its 215-year history today, October 11, 2015, with the inauguration and celebration of its 17th president, Laurie L Patton, on a splendid fall morning punctuated by gusty winds and sunny skies Sunday. More than 1,000 people gathered in the quadrangle on the west side of Old Chapel to bear witness to history and absorb the words of the new president and several others as autumnal colors emanated from the maples, beeches, and hickory trees surrounding the pastoral scene. Marna C. Whittington, the chair of the Middlebury Board of Trustees, conducted the investiture of the new president and presented Gamaliel Painter’s cane to her, which was the walking stick carried by one of the College’s founders and by every president thereafter. One of those presidents, John M. McCardell Jr., Middlebury’s 15th, returned to the community he called home for more than three decades to present the traditional pewter medallion to the newest president—and first woman to hold the office.After a standing ovation, the first of two she would receive on this memorable occasion, President Patton delivered her 35-minute inaugural address. She described what she has come to see as “that determined, engaged optimism” that lies at the heart of the institution; the vital role played by the mountains, both Green and Adirondack, in shaping the community; the challenge to have “more and better arguments with greater respect, stronger resilience, and deeper wisdom”; and her five thoughts about a vision for the future. From Vermont to California, and at Middlebury’s sites around the globe, the first three months of Laurie Patton’s tenure have been marked by her humility, her passion, her scholarship, and her active-listening skills. (Her official start date was on July 1, 2015.) And in her inaugural address she displayed all of those qualities, first when she recognized Butch Varno in the audience. Not a student, an alumnus, or an employee, Varno is a disabled resident of Middlebury who has been “picked up” and transported to home athletic contests and major events by members of the football and basketball teams for the past 55 years.Patton connected the optimism of Middlebury’s people to the mountains that flank it to the east and west. “These mountains call all of us to be bigger in our aspirations and yet also to be smaller and linked to a larger cause. Middlebury's mountains give us a sense of place that is also a sense of community,” she said. “The mountains help us find our place in the world, and even if we don't find it immediately, we have a deep and abiding trust that we will. This is the strength of the hills.”She likened the mountains’ effect on the Vermont campus to the ocean’s effect on the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey where the Pacific lends “perspective and sense of the larger picture.”Middlebury is distinct from other liberal arts institutions, Patton said, in its heritage of open mindedness, its aspirations, its schools and programs, its exuberance, and in “our love and care for languages and writing and sciences and society and arts and athletics all at the same time.”Middlebury has one more distinctive feature – “our capacity to argue and be resilient in those arguments” – and it was upon this facet of the Middlebury persona that the new president devoted the majority of her talk. As Patton so often does in her public addresses, she rooted her central thesis on an ancient text or concept, in this instance on the Jewish tradition of “argument for the sake of heaven.”Patton traced the role that argumentation has played in the development of Middlebury over the past 215 years, and urged the community to be thinking how today’s arguments will be viewed by Middlebury citizens 100 years from now.“I hope we are all thinking about that, because I believe that Middlebury's collective genius of warmth, optimism, rigor, and compassion can make us some of the best arguers in higher education – arguers who can think together with deeper respect, stronger resilience, and greater wisdom.”In her vision for Middlebury, Patton mapped out five points of focus, including what it means to be global, looking beyond carbon neutrality, a better understanding of the idea of diversity, the role of identity in human relationships, and how to understand the larger Middlebury of today with its many schools and programs.Patton’s inaugural address was met with thunderous applause and a second standing ovation. Guest speakers at the inauguration included Natasha Trethewey, the U.S. poet laureate, who read her poem “Illumination.” The winner of the 2007 Pulitzer Prize for poetry is a former colleague of Laurie Patton’s — they taught together on the faculty at Emory University. Trethewey, who has also served as a faculty member at the Middlebury Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, read one of President Patton’s poems “On Learning Sacred Language in Childhood.”Richard Brodhead, president of Duke University, and James Douglas ’72, former governor of Vermont and Middlebury executive in residence, also served as guest speakers. Brodhead saluted Patton as “an active and continuous learner. When you are in Laurie’s company, her way of engaging you animates you, such that your thoughts become more interesting. She actively listens, takes your ideas in, and allows them to release thoughts of her own, in a free-form synthesis that’s always opening new vistas.”“Laurie Patton is a skilled administrator, but her real claim to the office entrusted to her today is that she is a natural leader in this sense,” continued Brodhead. “Building on your best thought, she will help a great liberal arts college make a profound case for the liberal arts, without being afraid to try new things or adapt to a new circumstances. Let’s be frank: she has one downside, and you have probably already discovered it. Whatever you do, she’ll work twice as hard as you."A half-baked remark from you will receive a super-thoughtful reply from her; and she will still be up answering messages long after you have folded your tent. The consolation is that with Laurie Patton around, you will never doubt that education is a source of energy, inspiration, fellowship and fun.”Governor Douglas quoted President Reagan: “The greatest leader is not…the one who does the greatest things, [but] the one [who] gets [others] to do the greatest things,” and added, “I’m confident that we have such a leader [in] President Patton.” Messages of celebration and welcome to Laurie Patton were delivered on the platform by: Susan Baldridge, provost of Middlebury; Jason Merrill ’90, director of the Kathryn Wasserman Davis School of Russian on behalf of the Middlebury Language Schools; Laura Burian, professor of translation and interpretation on behalf of the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey; and Roberto Lint Sagarena, director of the Center for the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity.Also issuing messages of celebration and welcome were: Mathematics Professor Priscilla Bremser on behalf of the faculty; Robert Sideli ’77, president of the Middlebury College Alumni Association on behalf of the alumni; Brook Escobedo, ’04 M.A. Spanish School, president of the Middlebury College Staff Council on behalf of the staff; and Donna Donahue, member of the town Select Board on behalf of the Town of Middlebury.Former presidents James Armstrong and Olin Robison were represented at the inauguration by their wives, Carol and Sylvia. Armstrong, the 12th president, passed away in 2013, and Robison, the 13th, is in ill health. In addition, more than 60 colleges, universities, and learned societies sent delegates to the inauguration including President Patton’s undergraduate alma mater, Harvard University, and her graduate institution, the University of Chicago. Photos by Brett Simisonlast_img

SOLAIR ‘Trans-bronzing bike jersey’ from EKOÏ

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first_img Related With the aim of overcoming the harmful effects of the sun and at the same time limiting the ‘unflattering tan marks well known to cyclists’, apparel and accessories specialist, EKOI? has unveiled SOLAIR. The new apparel is billed as ‘the first trans-bronzing cycling jersey’ and is available exclusively on the brand’s website.EKOI?’s ‘tan through bike jersey’ is all about reducing tan lines. EKOI? uses a patented fabric technology from SunSelect Textiles. These fabrics are created and manufactured in the Netherlands. The patented technology works by allowing the tanning UV-A rays through to the skin and filters out most of the dangerous UV-B rays.EKOI? adds that its SOLAIR jersey offers a ‘unique, high quality, and attractive bike wear that lets sunlight through and protects the skin like a medium level sunscreen.’ Those prone to sunburn and/or with very fair skin need to apply an additional sun screen before putting on the shirt in order to be better protected.Features:81% special polyester and 19% LycraFull zip, 3 back pocketsRegular fit5 sizes: S, M, L, XL, XXL3 colours: red, green, blueRRP £90www.ekoi.comlast_img

Man killed while attempting to run across I-35; Lenexa short-term road closures on 79th St., Winchester begin Monday

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first_imgMan killed while attempting to run across I-35 in Lenexa.Police have identified the man killed while trying to run across I-35 in Lenexa on Saturday as Justin Valentine of Overland Park. Valentine was struck by a semi-truck near the 95th Street intersection at approximately 4:30 a.m. He was pronounced dead at the scene.Lenexa short-term road closures on 79th St., Winchester begin MondayWaterOne will close 79th Street between Mullen Road and Rene Street to all traffic in two phases starting Monday, July 6, for two to three weeks.Throughout this project, 79th Street will be closed to through traffic from Lackman Road to Pflumm Road. Starting Monday, 79th Street will be closed to all traffic between Mullen Road and Cottonwood Street. Once work in this area is complete, 79th Street will close just east of Cottonwood Street to the Mill Creek Elementary School entrance just west of Rene Street.Eastbound 79th Street traffic will detour via Lackman Road to 87th Street Parkway to Pflumm Road. Westbound traffic will detour via Pflumm Road to Blackfish Parkway to Lackman Road.Lenexa will also close Winchester Street from westbound 87th Street Parkway to 86th Terrace from Monday, July 6 to Monday, July 13, while road crews facilitate utility work for a nearby private development. The marked detour route is via 86th Terrace to Elmridge Street to eastbound 87th Street Parkway.last_img

Bose Pro Delivers First Round of ControlSpace CSP-1248 and CSP-428

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first_imgBose Professional is now shipping its new ControlSpace Commercial Sound Processors — the CSP-1248 and CSP-428 — and three new digital wall controllers.The CSP-1248 and CSP-428 benefit from an onboard CSP configuration utility and browser-based UI that provide a quick-setup workflow. Common tasks are presented in a logical manner, so installers can configure the system faster, reducing installation time while increasing setup accuracy.Bose CSPs offer just the right mix of inputs and outputs, including balanced analog I/O and mono-summed RCA inputs, as well as control inputs, control outputs and a mute contact. A Bose AmpLink output allows for a simplified digital audio connection to compatible power amplifiers, reducing terminations and related points of failure. In addition to enabling configuration via Mac or PC, the rear-panel Ethernet port connects to optional ControlCenter digital zone controllers and the ControlSpace Remote app.Once installed, proprietary Bose algorithms offer predictable performance, making Bose CSPs the convenient solution end users are looking for. Opti-source level management monitors the input level of up to four sources, maintaining a consistent volume level between them. DynamicEQ processing expands performance and response at any listening level. Additionally, Opti-voice paging provides a smooth transition between music and page signals. When combined with the Bose AVM-1 sense microphone, AutoVolume compensation continuously adapts zone output level based on the ambient noise of an active space.Complementing the new CSP processors are three new user-friendly digital wall controllers: the CC-1D, CC-2D and CC-3D. Each model comes in black or white and is available in regional variants. They feature attractive styling with a single rotary encoder and circular LED ring. The CC-2D and CC-3D models have a push-button rotary encoder to allow for A/B or A/B/C/D source selection with LED source indicators on the panel. In addition to the new digital wall controllers, the new CSP and ESP processors are supported by ControlSpace Remote, allowing customized control panels to be built and deployed to end users for wireless control of their systems from mobile phones, tablets or laptops.All the specs are here.last_img

Vietnam reports H5N6 and H5N1 outbreaks as Europe battles more H5N8

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first_imgAnimal health officials in Vietnam reported the first outbreaks of the year involving two highly pathogenic avian flu strains—H5N6 and H5N1—as five European countries reported more outbreaks of H5N8 in both wild birds and poultry.Outbreaks are Vietnam's first of 2017The H5N6 outbreak in Vietnam is the country's first since last summer, increasing the number of Asian countries reporting recent detections of the virus to seven. Other nations or territories that have reported recent H5N6 outbreaks are China, Hong Kong, Japan, Myanmar, South Korea, and Taiwan.In the latest event, the virus struck backyard birds in Quang Ngai province in the east central part of Vietnam, according to a report today from the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE). The outbreak began on Feb 12, killing 2,000 of 6,160 susceptible birds, with the surviving ones culled to control the spread of the virus.Meanwhile, an H5N1 outbreak struck backyard birds in Bac Lieu province in southern Vietnam, the OIE said yesterday in a report. The event began on Feb 14, killing 400 of 2,785 birds in the area. Authorities destroyed the remaining poultry as part of response measures. Vietnam's last H5N1 outbreak occurred in October of 2016.Elsewhere, Taiwan, which reported its first H5N6 outbreak earlier this month, over the weekend confirmed three more outbreaks, to bring its total to 16, China News Agency (CNA) reported yesterday. The latest events include a chicken farm in Yunlin County, a goose farm in Chiayi County, and ducks at a slaughterhouse in Yilan County.H5N6 has been linked to 17 illnesses in humans, all in China.H5N8 developments in EuropeIn France, H5N8 and other strains continue in a hard-hit area in the southwest of the country that is home to foie gras production, the second year in a row the area has battled such outbreaks.Agriculture officials reported 46 more H5N8 outbreaks in poultry in Gers and Landes departments, with start dates ranging from Feb 6 to Feb 13, according to the OIE. Affected farms housed mainly ducks, but some chickens and geese were affected as well. Of 218,548 susceptible birds, the virus killed 46, and the remaining birds were destroyed.French officials also reported seven more H5N8 outbreaks in wild birds found dead in different parts of the country, including Ain department in the east central part of the country and Vosges department in the northeast. Taken together, 19 birds were found dead between Feb 3 and Feb 8, most of them mute swans.In other French avian flu developments, officials also reported four poultry farm outbreaks involving low-pathogenic H5N1, another strain authorities have been battling in the southwest. The detections occurred from Feb 6 to Feb 11 in Gers and Tarn departments.Elsewhere, four other countries in Europe reported fresh H5N8 outbreaks, according to the latest reports from the OIE:Croatia reported one more outbreak involving five wild swans found dead beginning on Feb 7 in Koprivnica-Krizevci county in the north.Italy reported another outbreak in poultry, this time at a turkey farm in Veneto region in the northeast. The outbreak began on Feb 16, killing 140 of 41,373 susceptible birds.Sweden reported two more detections in wild birds, both in Stockholm. The events involved a mute swan and a crow found dead on Feb 2 and Feb 3, respectively.Ukraine officials reported an outbreak at a zoo in the city of Mykolaiv in the southern part of the country. The facility houses 931 birds of 104 different species. The outbreak began on Feb 14, killing 10 peacocks.See also:Feb 20 OIE report on H5N6 in VietnamFeb 19 OIE report on H5N1 in VietnamFeb 19 CNA reportFeb 17 OIE report on H5N8 in French poultryFeb 17 OIE report on H5N8 in French wild birdsFeb 17 OIE report on low-path H5N1 in French poultryFeb 17 OIE report on H5N8 in CroatiaFeb 17 OIE report on H5N8 in ItalyFeb 17 OIE report on H5N8 in SwedenFeb 17 OIE report on H5N8 in Ukrainelast_img

Part 36 offers excluding interest are not valid, rules Court of Appeal

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first_imgLawyers have finally been handed certainty on the validity of Part 36 offers after being met with differing interpretations from the High Court. Three Court of Appeal judges ruled last month in King v City of London Corporation that it was not possible to make a valid Part 36 settlement offer exclusive of interest. To do so, they agreed, would result in the offer not being compliant with Civil Procedure Rules. The dispute arose after the lawyers for the successful claimant Francis King had served a bill of costs for detailed assessment, with a Part 36 offer to accept £50,000 in full and final settlement of the costs detailed within the bill only. Crucially, the letter stated that the offer related to the whole claim for costs ‘but excludes interest’. Confusion ensued when the deputy master, upheld by the High Court, ruled that an offer exclusive of interest could not be a valid Part 36 offer. But in contrast, in Horne v Prescot (No 1) Ltd, Mr Justice Nicol held that, at least in the context of detailed assessment proceedings, an offer excluding interest could be valid. Lord Justice Newey, giving the lead judgment in King, said differing opinions had also been expressed by other costs judges, not helped by an apparent conflict on the issue between Part 36 rules and the wording of practice direction 47, which makes provision for an offer to deal with interest. The judge stated that the rules as they stand remain clear: a Part 36 offer cannot generally exclude interest. ‘Part 36 proceeds on the basis that interest is ancillary to a claim, not a severable part of it,’ he said. ‘Interest cannot be hived off. True it is that, on occasion, there may be room for substantial dispute as regards interest and that the amount at stake could be large, but the same could be said about costs.’ He added the true position was not that King’s offer was to be treated as inclusive of interest, but that it was a non-compliant offer. Lord Justice Coulson, agreeing to dismiss King’s appeal, noted that the rules requiring compliant Part 36 offers to be inclusive of all interest were ‘unqualified’. Lord Justice Arnold ‘reluctantly’ came to the same conclusion on the basis of the rules as they stand, but he noted that the issue merits further consideration by the rules committee. He said there remain arguments in favour of permitting Part 36 offers to be made exclusive of interest, and the committee could amend the rules to say so.last_img

VW action prompts new call for ‘opt-out’ group claims

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first_imgA group action case pitting thousands of vehicle owners against car giant VW has sparked renewed calls for a change in the law to introduce US-style ‘opt-out’ class actions. According to Slater and Gordon, one of the firms running the case on behalf of consumers, more than a million motorists could miss out on justice because of what it called ‘outdated laws’ in England and Wales. The firm said the current law, where each complainant is required to bring a case against the defendant, either individually or by joining a group action, hinders access to justice. Adopting the opt-out model applied in other common law jurisdictions would ensure victims get compensation. Only in competition claims, where companies are effectively accused of acting as cartels, do consumers in the UK qualify for without having to apply. That measure was introduced under the Consumer Rights Act 2015.Around 60,000 motorists have so far joined VW claim, Slater and Gordon said. However, it is estimated that around 1.2 million people owned the models of diesel vehicles that are the subject of the claim. It is alleged that VW deceived consumers by designing and installing an illegal ‘defeat device’ to manipulate the results of emissions tests. The device, which the claimants say was installed in certain diesel engines, detected when engines were under test conditions and turned on pollution controls that were not employed in normal driving. VW strenuously denies the claims.A deadline of 26 October has been set for claimants to register for the claim. David Barda, associate at Slater and Gordon, said: ‘The law in the UK is not keeping pace with other common law countries, including the US and Canada. UK courts do the best they can with the laws they have, and the opt-out system being used in competition claims shows there is progress being made. But it is up to the government to change the law to reduce the burden on the courts and improve access to justice for UK victims.’Barda added: ‘In the US or Australia, a small group proves the case and all other victims get a cheque in the post. It’s the most efficient way of serving justice fairly.’last_img

Hyundai Rotem wins further Bangladesh loco contract

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first_imgBANGLADESH: Hyundai Rotem announced on October 11 that it had won a US$239m order to supply 70 diesel-electric locomotives for Bangladesh Railway. Production at Rotem’s Changwon plant in South Korea is due to begin in 2020, with deliveries due by 2023. The 19 m long, 2 200 hp locos would be used on the metre-gauge Dhaka – Chittagong route. Maximum speed would be 110 km/h. Earlier this year Rotem won a contract to supply 10 locomotives to BR for use on the same route. The South Korean manufacturer previously supplied 39 locomotives of Class 2900 to BR in 1999-2013, built under licence from EMD.last_img