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The most fouled players in the Premier League so far this season

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first_img 22 22 22 Green reveals how he confronted Sarri after Chelsea's 6-0 defeat at Man City LATEST PREMIER LEAGUE NEWS Murray has been fouled 34 times this season 4. Richarlison (Everton) 22 Mitrovic has been fouled 37 times =11. Andros Townsend (Crystal Palace) Torreira has been fouled 52 times huge blow 19. Sadio Mane (Liverpool) no dice Mane has been fouled 36 times 17. Ashley Barnes (Burnley) Premier League Team of the Season so far, including Liverpool and Leicester stars Pogba has been fouled 44 times 22 Hojbjerg has been fouled 36 times 22 gameday cracker 22 =15. David Brooks (Bournemouth) shining REVEALED Gunedouzi has been fouled 42 times Son ban confirmed as Tottenham fail with appeal to overturn red card =4. Lucas Torreira (Arsenal) 22 Zaha has been fouled 63 times =15. Granit Xhaka (Arsenal) Maddison has been fouled 42 times =8. Isaac Success (Watford) 5. Paul Pogba (Manchester United) Where Ancelotti ranks with every Premier League boss for trophies won “I don’t think he’s targeted as a person I just think players who run with the ball as well as he does just get fouled. His play was good enough to provoke those fouls.”But does Hodgson have a point; do players who constantly look to dribble the ball constantly get fouled?Thanks to Whoscored.com, it’s possible to see who has been fouled the most so far in the Premier League this season.20. Glenn Murray (Brighton and Hove Albion) For every awe-inspiring dribble you see on a football pitch, there is (inevitably) at least one member of the opposition looking to ‘disrupt’ their flow.When Diego Maradona shimmied his way through the England defence on that fateful, scorching hot day at Mexico ’86, you can bet your life Peter Reid wishes he had scythed the magician down. Hazard has been fouled 69 times Xhaka has been fouled 38 times 1. Eden Hazard (Chelsea) Boxing Day fixtures: All nine Premier League games live on talkSPORT 22 Murphy has been fouled 40 times Hazard knows what it is like to receive special attention in the Premier League =17. Aleksandar Mitrovic (Fulham) 8. Matteo Guendouzi (Arsenal) Oxlade-Chamberlain suffers another setback as Klopp confirms serious injury REVEALED tense 2. Wilfried Zaha (Crystal Palace) Barnes has been fouled 37 times 22 22 22 22 Kane has been fouled 41 times =15. Felipe Anderson (West Ham United) 9. Harry Kane (Tottenham Hotspur) 15. Ryan Fraser (Bournemouth) =8. James Maddison (Leicester City) 22 For every showstopping artiste that captures the imagination of the crowd, there is an unscrupulous enforcer looking to stop them – this has been the pattern in football since records began.Crystal Palace boss Roy Hodgson was left incensed as a frustrated Wilfried Zaha saw red for two petulant yellow cards at Southampton on Wednesday night.The former England boss said of his talisman: “It’s disappointing that a player who perhaps provided the most entertainment throughout the game was consistently fouled.“That he wasn’t able to contain his frustration with that consistent fouling and complains about a foul that wasn’t given and probably should have been. Townsend has been fouled 40 times 22 Success has been fouled 42 times Which teams do the best on Boxing Day in the Premier League era? Anderson has been fouled 38 times 22 22 A cynical foul could have stopped one of the greatest goals in football history Richarlison has been fouled 52 times Brooks has been fouled 38 times 22 11. Josh Murphy (Cardiff City) 22 22 22 =19. Pierre-Emile Hojbjerg (Southampton) 22 Fraser has been fouled 38 times last_img

Gardaí warn of home burglaries during Papal visit

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first_imgGardaí are warning the faithful attendees of Papal events that they should take precautions to prevent burglars targetting their empty homes. Up to 750,000 people are expected to attend the World Meeting of Families (WMOF) events over Saturday and Sunday August 25 and 26.The Papal mass with Pope Francis in Dublin’s Phoenix Park will draw half a million people from their homes, while 45,000 tickets are booked for Knock Shrine. Gardaí are set to increase patrols nationally this weekend in a bid to catch burglars planning to break into empty homes.People leaving homes this weekend are being reminded to secure their homes and ask neighbours to check in on their properties.Gardaí recommended steps for home security and burglary prevention include: securing all doors and windows; light up your home; use timer switches when out; store keys safely and away from windows; record details of all valuables; don’t keep large amounts of cash at home; use your alarm even when at home.   Gardaí warn of home burglaries during Papal visit was last modified: August 23rd, 2018 by Staff WriterShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img

#AskIt – So How ‘Bout Those Hurricanes?

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first_img Yes No View Results  Loading ...The poll is live here and on Twitter. We’ll have your results next week. Share This!It’s Wednesday again, and time for another Ask It. There’s been one thing on our minds for the last week. Hurricanes. For the last two years, Disney has closed the parks and cancelled cruises due to hurricanes (Irma this year, Matthew last year).So we’re asking you:Are you rethinking your plans to schedule your vacation during hurricane season?last_img

Arkansas ~ Sales and Use Tax: Several Manufacturing Items Not Exempt

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first_imgCCH Tax Day ReportA taxpayer was liable for Arkansas sales and use tax on various replacement components since they did not qualify for the manufacturing machinery and equipment exemption, except for the black light since it was a complete replacement used in testing the finished product, rather than a component part of the machine.Components Considered Insubstantial ReplacementsThe following items were not entitled to the manufacturing machinery and equipment exemption since they were considered insubstantial replacements of manufacturing machinery: tool holders and shim purchases (not considered exempt dies), carbonseers (component parts of the furnace), the transformer (part of the building’s electrical system rather than the machine for which the transformer alters power), the process control panel even though the upgraded panel allowed the quantity of furnace control panels to be reduced from three panels to a single panel (component part of the furnace), the operator controls, the gauge replacements (even if they qualified as exempt testing equipment, they did not function independently and did not represent a substantial replacement of all the items involved in the quality control function), the heads for hammers (not considered dies since they did not have a predetermined and distinctive shape), and jaws, chucks and drill bushings (component parts of lathes).Adjustments to Machine SoftwareAdjustments made to machine software and certifications of mechanically adjusted pieces of machinery were also considered taxable machine repairs rather than nontaxable software programming services since the machinery or device was not functioning properly and the adjustment was made to return it to its original working order which is considered a taxable repair.Item Must be Used Directly in ManufacturingThe purchases of chip conveyer components were not exempt because the chip conveyer system, like an environmental control system, was not used directly in manufacturing. Yet the black light did qualify as exempt manufacturing machinery and equipment since it was a complete replacement, rather than a component part of the machine, and the black light was used in testing the finished product.Invoice Affects TaxabilityHow the invoice is prepared affects the taxability of the item or service. While it was conceded that the rental of the nitrogen storage tank was exempt, the gauge rental and hazmat fees associated with the tank were not exempt as they were separately stated on the invoice and it was unknown whether these fees were required by the seller for the tank rental. Fees described on the invoice as a taxable alteration to a piece of machinery were also taxable since despite testimony otherwise, the taxpayer was unable to prove that the services described and billed in the invoice were not performed. Finally, a nontaxable roof repair became taxable since it was billed with the taxable gutter cleaning and not separately stated on the invoice.Administrative Decision Nos. 16-128, 16-183, 16-184, 16-410, Arkansas Department of Finance and Administration, Office of Hearings and Appeals, September 15, 2016, ¶400-734last_img

Latin America’s lost histories revealed in modern DNA

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first_imgBritish ships often harassed Spanish galleons, which ferried long-forgotten peoples to Latin America, including enslaved Filipinos and former Jews. Juan Esteban Rodríguez, a graduate student in population genetics at the National Laboratory of Genomics for Biodiversity (LANGEBIO) in Irapuato, Mexico, initially planned to study a recent thread in the global tapestry that is Mexican ancestry. Starting in the 19th century, many Chinese immigrants moved to Mexico to construct railroads in the country's northern states. Growing up near the U.S. border, Rodríguez knew this history well, and he wanted to see whether he could identify the Chinese immigrants' genetic contribution to the modern Mexican population.But when he searched a database of 500 Mexican genomes—initially assembled for biomedical studies—and sought genetic variants more common in Asian populations, he found a surprise. Some people from northern Mexico did have significant Asian ancestry, but they weren't the only ones. Rodríguez discovered that about one-third of the people sampled in Guerrero, the Pacific coastal state that lies nearly 2000 kilometers south of the U.S. border, also had up to 10% Asian ancestry, significantly more than most Mexicans. And when he compared their genomes to those of people in Asia today, he found that they were most closely related to populations from the Philippines and Indonesia.Rodríguez and his adviser, Andrés Moreno-Estrada, a population geneticist at LANGEBIO, turned to the historical record to figure out who these people's ancestors might be. They learned from historians who study ship manifests and other trade documents that during the 16th and 17th centuries, Spanish galleons sailed between Manila and the port of Acapulco in Guerrero, carrying goods and people, including enslaved Asians. Although historians knew of this transpacific slave trade, the origins of its victims were lost. Once they landed in Mexico, they were all recorded as "chinos"—Chinese, says Moreno-Estrada, who will present the work this weekend at the American Association of Physical Anthropologists (AAPA) annual meeting here. "We're uncovering these hidden stories of slavery and people who lost their identities when they disembarked in a whole new country."Other researchers study the legacy of another marginalized group in colonial Mexico: Africans. Tens of thousands of enslaved and free Africans lived in Mexico during the 16th and 17th centuries, outnumbering Europeans, and today almost all Mexicans carry about 4% African ancestry. The percentage is much higher in some communities, says geneticist María Ávila-Arcos of the International Laboratory for Human Genome Research in Juriquilla, Mexico. She found that in Afro-descendent communities in Guerrero and Oaxaca, many of which remain isolated, people had about 26% African ancestry, most of it from West Africa.Other data also suggest a strong African presence in colonial Mexico. Bioarchaeologist Corey Ragsdale of Southern Illinois University in Edwardsville and his colleagues examined skeletons for dental and cranial traits that tend to be more common among Africans. They estimated that 20% to 40% of the people buried in cemeteries in Mexico City between the 16th and 18th centuries had some African ancestry, as they will present this weekend at the AAPA meeting. "It could be that Africans played as much of a role in developing population structure, and in fact developing the [Spanish] empire, as Europeans did," Ragsdale says.Ávila-Arcos hopes to use genetic data to trace the ancestors of those in her study back to specific West African groups or regions. She's also found significant Asian ancestry in some of her volunteers, likely an echo of communities once formed by enslaved Africans and Asians on the Pacific coast.Some Europeans carried hidden histories with them to colonial Latin America. A preprint recently posted on the bioRxiv server used genetic data from more than 6500 people born in Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, and Peru to tease apart how specific Native American groups and multiple populations from the Iberian peninsula contributed to modern genomes. "It's undoubtedly the most comprehensive genetic analysis of Latin American populations to date," Ávila-Arcos says. (The authors declined to comment because the paper has been submitted to a peer-reviewed journal.) One striking finding was that genetic variants common in the eastern Mediterranean and North Africa, and especially in Sephardic Jews, show up all over Latin America, in nearly a quarter of the individuals sampled.The authors, led by geneticists Andrés Ruiz-Linares of Fudan University in Shanghai, China, and Garrett Hellenthal of University College London, trace a significant portion of this ancestry to conversos, or Jews who converted to Christianity in 1492, when Spain expelled those who refused to do so. Conversos were prohibited from migrating to the Spanish colonies, though a few are known to have made the trip anyway. But widespread Sephardic ancestry in Latin America implies that migration was much more common than records suggest.For Ragsdale, the work serves as a reminder that even migrations scientists think are well understood can contain surprises. "The way we think about colonization is simplified," Ragsdale says. "We're missing a lot of subtleties here." Latin America’s lost histories revealed in modern DNA By Lizzie WadeApr. 12, 2018 , 2:00 PMcenter_img Este artículo está disponible en español.AUSTIN—If you walked the cobblestone streets and bustling markets of 16th and 17th century Mexico City, you would see people born all over the world: Spanish settlers on their way to mass at the cathedral built atop Aztec ruins. Indigenous people from around the Americas, including soldiers who had joined the Spanish cause. Africans, both enslaved and free, some of whom had been among the first conquistadors. Asians, who traveled to Mexico on Spanish galleons, some by choice and some in bondage. All these populations met and mingled for the first time in colonial Latin America.Historical documents describe this cultural mixture, but now international teams of researchers are enriching our view by analyzing the genomes of people today. Aided by sophisticated statistics and worldwide genetic databases, they can tease apart ancestry and population mixing with more nuance than ever before. The results, reported at a meeting here this week and in a preprint, tell stories of Latin America that have been largely forgotten or were never recorded in historical documents. From the immigration of enslaved Filipinos to that of formerly Jewish families forbidden to travel to the colonies, hidden histories are emerging.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D'IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People's Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People's Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)"It's helping us to recognize the ways that really fine-scale historical experiences and practices have left this deeply significant imprint on our genomes," says Deborah Bolnick, an anthropological geneticist at the University of Texas here. THE CAPTURE OF THE SPANISH GALLEON ‘NUESTRA SEÑORA DE COVADONGA’, 20 APRIL 1743, CLEVELEY, JOHN THE YOUNGER (1747–86)/SHUGBOROUGH HALL, STAFFORDSHIRE, U.K./NATIONAL TRUST PHOTOGRAPHIC LIBRARY/BRIDGEMAN IMAGES last_img

Cornell nutrition scientist resigns after retractions and research misconduct finding

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first_img Wikimedia Commons By Kelly ServickSep. 21, 2018 , 11:25 AM Cornell nutrition scientist resigns after retractions and research misconduct finding Brian Wansink, the Cornell University nutrition researcher known for probing the psychology behind human eating habits, has resigned after a university misconduct investigation, and following the retraction this week of six of his papers.In a statement issued yesterday, Cornell’s provost, Michael Kotlikoff, said the investigation had revealed “misreporting of research data, problematic statistical techniques, failure to properly document and preserve research results, and inappropriate authorship.”Wansink contested the university’s conclusion in a statement shared with Science, saying, “The interpretation of these four acts of misconduct can be debated, and I did so for a year without the success I expected.” He admitted to mistaken reporting, poor documentation, and “some statistical mistakes,” but maintains that there was “no fraud, no intentional misreporting, no plagiarism, or no misappropriation” in his work. “I believe all of my findings will be either supported, extended, or modified by other research groups,” he added.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D'IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People's Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People's Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) Wansink, who directed Cornell’s Food and Brand Lab, won public attention for headline-friendly findings suggesting that it’s relatively easy to manipulate what people choose to eat—and in what quantities—by tweaking features of their environments. Among the papers retracted by The Journal of the American Medical Association on 19 September are one finding that people ate more calories while watching a stimulating action movie than a tame interview show and another concluding that people given bigger bowls at a Super Bowl party served themselves more calories. Brian Wansink Related content Meet the ‘data thugs’ out to expose shoddy and questionable research But Wansink drew criticism for a 2016 blog post in which he seemed to praise a grad student for massaging negative results into positive ones. Several of his findings were questioned in online analyses published by research integrity watchdogs Nick Brown of the University of Groningen in the Netherlands and James Heathers of Northeastern University in Boston. Thirteen of his papers have now been retracted, and at least 15 more have been formally corrected, according to Retraction Watch.Wansink has been removed from research and teaching, according to Cornell, but he’ll “be obligated to spend his time cooperating with the university in its ongoing review of his prior research.”last_img