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Susan Sarandon Did Not Feud With Julia Roberts When They Made “Stepmom”

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first_imgWhen SUSAN SARANDON and JULIA ROBERTS made the movie “Stepmom” 20 years ago, there were rumors that they FEUDED on the set.  Those rumors weren’t true.Susan was live-Tweeting her show “Feud: Bette and Joan” on Sunday night, when she shared this . . . quote, “Press printed that Julia & I hated each other during Stepmom.  Found out it was my PR person creating rumors.”As you may know, “Feud” is about how BETTE DAVIS and JOAN CRAWFORD almost clawed each other’s eyes out while making the 1962 movie “Whatever Happened to Baby Jane?”Susan plays Bette, and JESSICA LANGE plays Joan.  And Susan would like you to know THEY got along fine.  Quote, “Jess & I not only got along great during filming, we’re now dating.”(Ironically, the feud between Bette and Joan was fueled by the press, and people associated with the film, in order to drum up interest.)last_img

Manage Your Online Social Life All In One Place With MyLife

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first_imgThe Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videos jon mitchell MyLife.com, a “people search” engine that searches across social networks, has just launched a new feature called “Personal Relationship Management” (PRM), and it’s much cooler than it sounds. It’s a browser-based service that lets you view your Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn feeds all in one stream and reply, like, retweet and so on as needed.This PRM stream appears on the ‘Home’ screen, from which you can launch all kinds of searches for old classmates, colleagues, singles and such, using MyLife’s existing people searches, already in use by over 60 million people. It’s a ‘freemium’ site, and the paid features give you more access to features like ‘Who’s Searching For You,’ showing you people with whom you aren’t already connected. The free service is valuable. It’s great to be able to manage all these social accounts from one feed. You can do this from apps like HootSuite or TweetDeck, but those don’t offer the broad-reaching search capabilities MyLife.com does. Even the free model lets you manage your social networks and quickly find people or messages on them all in one place. The paid version expands those capabilities beyond your existing social network connections.The sign-up process might try to fool you, but don’t worry; the basic features are free. Once you click through to sign up, there’s a teeny link in the top-right corner that says ‘Continue with limited access’ to let you past the paid signup that confronts you before you get to see what the service does.The free MyLife.com service is pretty pushy. It pops up huge, meaty pictures of cheeseburgers in your face and asks you to sign up for MyLife Deals emails. But that’s the price of free, and for someone looking for a Web service to manage one’s online life in a centralized place, you can’t ask for more than this in terms of features. Make sure to check your spam folder for your sign-up email, because ours ended up there. Tags:#Product Reviews#Social Web#web Related Posts Guide to Performing Bulk Email Verification Upcoming FeaturesCEO Jeff Tinsley says that MyLife will release mobile apps later this month, and that’s a great use case. One app that lets users manage Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn will save lots of icon space. Google+ integration is coming soon, as are Gmail, Hotmail, Yahoo mail and AOL Instant Messenger. It’s an interesting proposal to open a social media dashboard up to email and IM, too, so watch for upcoming releases later this year.How do you manage your online social life? Share your solutions in the comments. Facebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro... A Comprehensive Guide to a Content Auditlast_img

Consolidating older 2-socket workloads onto Dell’s new R810 (Xeon 7500/6500)

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first_imgIntel's Xeon 7500/6500 processor series brings the biggest leap in performance in Xeon's history.This level of performance enables consolidation of a ton of older servers onto significantly fewer Xeon 7500/6500 generation platforms...saving a considerable amount of money.For example, IT managers can consolidate up to 20 older single-core 4-socket servers onto a single Xeon 7500 4-socket system representing a 4-socket to 4-socket consolidation ratio up to 20:1. The resulting savings from reduced power usage and OS licensing costs can show a payback of less than a year on the cost of the new server. That's a fantastic payback....and if application software costs and other savings are included the ROI is even greater.Similarly favorable 2-socket consolidation ratios are possible by moving workloads off of older 2-socket systems and onto Xeon 7500/6500 servers.A good example of this comes from Dell. Their engineering solutions teams recently published three technical white papers showing the benefits of consolidating database and virtualization workloads running on older 2-socket servers onto their new R810 server based on the Xeon 7500 processor series. The R810 is a pretty cool, innovative platform with Dell's FlexMem Bridge Technology that allows full access to the entire system memory whether the system is populated with just 2 or the full 4 sockets.The Dell engineers provide a lot of useful technical information. Check the white papers out yourself by following the link below. Link to Dell's technical white papers:http://en.community.dell.com/dell-blogs/b/tech-center/archive/2010/05/10/scaling-database-workloads-on-dell-poweredge-11g-servers-with-intel-nehalem-ex.aspxLink to more information about the new Intel Xeon 7500/6600 processor series:http://www.intel.com/itcenter/products/xeon/7500/?iid=gg_work+home_xeon7500last_img

Latin America’s lost histories revealed in modern DNA

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first_imgBritish ships often harassed Spanish galleons, which ferried long-forgotten peoples to Latin America, including enslaved Filipinos and former Jews. Juan Esteban Rodríguez, a graduate student in population genetics at the National Laboratory of Genomics for Biodiversity (LANGEBIO) in Irapuato, Mexico, initially planned to study a recent thread in the global tapestry that is Mexican ancestry. Starting in the 19th century, many Chinese immigrants moved to Mexico to construct railroads in the country's northern states. Growing up near the U.S. border, Rodríguez knew this history well, and he wanted to see whether he could identify the Chinese immigrants' genetic contribution to the modern Mexican population.But when he searched a database of 500 Mexican genomes—initially assembled for biomedical studies—and sought genetic variants more common in Asian populations, he found a surprise. Some people from northern Mexico did have significant Asian ancestry, but they weren't the only ones. Rodríguez discovered that about one-third of the people sampled in Guerrero, the Pacific coastal state that lies nearly 2000 kilometers south of the U.S. border, also had up to 10% Asian ancestry, significantly more than most Mexicans. And when he compared their genomes to those of people in Asia today, he found that they were most closely related to populations from the Philippines and Indonesia.Rodríguez and his adviser, Andrés Moreno-Estrada, a population geneticist at LANGEBIO, turned to the historical record to figure out who these people's ancestors might be. They learned from historians who study ship manifests and other trade documents that during the 16th and 17th centuries, Spanish galleons sailed between Manila and the port of Acapulco in Guerrero, carrying goods and people, including enslaved Asians. Although historians knew of this transpacific slave trade, the origins of its victims were lost. Once they landed in Mexico, they were all recorded as "chinos"—Chinese, says Moreno-Estrada, who will present the work this weekend at the American Association of Physical Anthropologists (AAPA) annual meeting here. "We're uncovering these hidden stories of slavery and people who lost their identities when they disembarked in a whole new country."Other researchers study the legacy of another marginalized group in colonial Mexico: Africans. Tens of thousands of enslaved and free Africans lived in Mexico during the 16th and 17th centuries, outnumbering Europeans, and today almost all Mexicans carry about 4% African ancestry. The percentage is much higher in some communities, says geneticist María Ávila-Arcos of the International Laboratory for Human Genome Research in Juriquilla, Mexico. She found that in Afro-descendent communities in Guerrero and Oaxaca, many of which remain isolated, people had about 26% African ancestry, most of it from West Africa.Other data also suggest a strong African presence in colonial Mexico. Bioarchaeologist Corey Ragsdale of Southern Illinois University in Edwardsville and his colleagues examined skeletons for dental and cranial traits that tend to be more common among Africans. They estimated that 20% to 40% of the people buried in cemeteries in Mexico City between the 16th and 18th centuries had some African ancestry, as they will present this weekend at the AAPA meeting. "It could be that Africans played as much of a role in developing population structure, and in fact developing the [Spanish] empire, as Europeans did," Ragsdale says.Ávila-Arcos hopes to use genetic data to trace the ancestors of those in her study back to specific West African groups or regions. She's also found significant Asian ancestry in some of her volunteers, likely an echo of communities once formed by enslaved Africans and Asians on the Pacific coast.Some Europeans carried hidden histories with them to colonial Latin America. A preprint recently posted on the bioRxiv server used genetic data from more than 6500 people born in Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, and Peru to tease apart how specific Native American groups and multiple populations from the Iberian peninsula contributed to modern genomes. "It's undoubtedly the most comprehensive genetic analysis of Latin American populations to date," Ávila-Arcos says. (The authors declined to comment because the paper has been submitted to a peer-reviewed journal.) One striking finding was that genetic variants common in the eastern Mediterranean and North Africa, and especially in Sephardic Jews, show up all over Latin America, in nearly a quarter of the individuals sampled.The authors, led by geneticists Andrés Ruiz-Linares of Fudan University in Shanghai, China, and Garrett Hellenthal of University College London, trace a significant portion of this ancestry to conversos, or Jews who converted to Christianity in 1492, when Spain expelled those who refused to do so. Conversos were prohibited from migrating to the Spanish colonies, though a few are known to have made the trip anyway. But widespread Sephardic ancestry in Latin America implies that migration was much more common than records suggest.For Ragsdale, the work serves as a reminder that even migrations scientists think are well understood can contain surprises. "The way we think about colonization is simplified," Ragsdale says. "We're missing a lot of subtleties here." Latin America’s lost histories revealed in modern DNA By Lizzie WadeApr. 12, 2018 , 2:00 PMcenter_img Este artículo está disponible en español.AUSTIN—If you walked the cobblestone streets and bustling markets of 16th and 17th century Mexico City, you would see people born all over the world: Spanish settlers on their way to mass at the cathedral built atop Aztec ruins. Indigenous people from around the Americas, including soldiers who had joined the Spanish cause. Africans, both enslaved and free, some of whom had been among the first conquistadors. Asians, who traveled to Mexico on Spanish galleons, some by choice and some in bondage. All these populations met and mingled for the first time in colonial Latin America.Historical documents describe this cultural mixture, but now international teams of researchers are enriching our view by analyzing the genomes of people today. Aided by sophisticated statistics and worldwide genetic databases, they can tease apart ancestry and population mixing with more nuance than ever before. The results, reported at a meeting here this week and in a preprint, tell stories of Latin America that have been largely forgotten or were never recorded in historical documents. From the immigration of enslaved Filipinos to that of formerly Jewish families forbidden to travel to the colonies, hidden histories are emerging.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D'IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People's Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People's Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)"It's helping us to recognize the ways that really fine-scale historical experiences and practices have left this deeply significant imprint on our genomes," says Deborah Bolnick, an anthropological geneticist at the University of Texas here. THE CAPTURE OF THE SPANISH GALLEON ‘NUESTRA SEÑORA DE COVADONGA’, 20 APRIL 1743, CLEVELEY, JOHN THE YOUNGER (1747–86)/SHUGBOROUGH HALL, STAFFORDSHIRE, U.K./NATIONAL TRUST PHOTOGRAPHIC LIBRARY/BRIDGEMAN IMAGES last_img

University research center will search for extraterrestrial intelligence

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first_img David Parker/Science Source University research center will search for extraterrestrial intelligence The massive Arecibo dish in Puerto Rico was used in a NASA search for alien radio signals before Congress canceled it in 1993. By Steve NadisFeb. 28, 2019 , 8:00 AMcenter_img The cutoff in federal funding has had a long-term, chilling effect, Wright says. He has identified just five people with Ph.D.s in research related to SETI. “It takes a special kind of person to go into a field that’s unfunded and holds few job prospects,” says Wright, who has, until now, had to pursue SETI as a hobby and sideline to his main job as an exoplanet investigator.The new Penn State center would hire faculty and postdocs and introduce undergraduate and graduate courses. It could eventually offer grants to researchers outside the university.So far, Penn State has received two private gift pledges totaling $3.5 million, which will create a new professorship within the astronomy department and subsidize other SETI research. Although that leaves a considerable sum to be raised, Wright considers it a good start, showing that “this idea is something that resonates.” He believes, moreover, that Penn State is an ideal base for SETI research because it has the pieces needed for such a far-reaching, interdisciplinary enterprise: a strong astronomy department, a NASA-funded Astrobiology Research Center, and the Center for Astrostatistics. The university also serves as the hub for the worldwide Astrophysical Multimessenger Observatory Network.Andrew Siemion, director of the SETI Research Center at the University of California, Berkeley, applauds the Penn State effort. “Having SETI in the school’s curriculum gives a stamp of approval to the field that is very important,” says Siemion, one of the five aforementioned Ph.D.s who never thought he could carve out a career in SETI.Tarter is similarly enthused. She sees the plans unveiled by Penn State as part of a “resurgence” of the field. She is excited by the steady stream of newly discovered worlds and is anxious to find out whether potentially habitable planets are, in fact, inhabited by intelligent life. “I don’t think you can ask the question of life beyond Earth and stop at microbes,” Tarter says. The search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) is getting a home base. On 1 March, Pennsylvania State University in State College will announce the first contributions to a campaign that hopes to raise $110 million for the new Penn State Extraterrestrial Intelligence (PSETI) Center with endowed professorships and a degree-granting graduate program. It would be one of just a few academic SETI research centers and, if plans are realized, it could be the first to offer courses from the undergraduate to Ph.D. level. Some astronomers say it would provide a badly needed boost to a subdiscipline that has long suffered from neglect.“There really isn’t an academic ecosystem for the field as a whole,” says Penn State astronomer Jason Wright, who will serve as the PSETI Center head. “You can’t work on it if you can’t hire students and postdocs.”Financial backing for SETI research has been scarce ever since 1993, when the U.S. Congress banned NASA from funding it. “We became the four-letter word at NASA,” recalls astronomer Jill Tarter, a co-founder of the SETI Institute in Mountain View, California, one of the few other centers to support SETI research with nongovernmental funds.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D'IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People's Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People's Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img

Hosts South Africa impress in World Cup opener

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first_imgSouth African midfielder Siphiwe Tshabalala was the toast of his nation, striking the first goal of the FIFA World Cup 2010 but Mexico's Rafael Marquez's equaliser sealed a thrilling 1-1 draw in a Group A fixture. [See match photos]In the second game of the day, 2006 finalists France and Uruguay opened with a 0-0 draw in Cape Town. [See match photos]The World Cup got underway after a colourful song and dance ceremony where the likes of R Kelly and Cheb Khaled performed before a crowd of around 95,000. [See photos of the opening ceremony]The iconic Nelson Mandela had to skip the event at the last minute after his great granddaughter passed away last night in a car accident shortly after attending the World Cup opening concert in Johannesburg.South African president Jacob Zuma declared the World Cup open during his speech here at the Soccer City.The two teams remained goal-less in the first half. But Tshabalala put the home team ahead in the 55th minute.They seemed to be taking the game home when Marques equalised in the 78th.Earlier in the first half, Mexico's Carlos Vela's strike in the 38th minute was ruled off-side.South Africa had a heart-break in the 90th minute when Teho Modise outran the Mexican defence but tragically hit the pole.last_img

Coast on the legendary dream machine

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first_imgOriginally designed as an efficient and practical runabout, the Mini Cooper has evolved as the embodiment of the fun of motoringIf you've drooled over the final scenes of the 2003 remake of The Italian Job then you're already sold on the Mini Cooper. The movie ends with a thrilling chase,Originally designed as an efficient and practical runabout, the Mini Cooper has evolved as the embodiment of the fun of motoringIf you've drooled over the final scenes of the 2003 remake of The Italian Job then you're already sold on the Mini Cooper. The movie ends with a thrilling chase in brightly painted Mini Coopers through subways, sewers, staircases and streets of Los Angeles. The choice of car was no doubt inspired by the fact that the original 1969 British movie, The Italian Job, starring Michael Caine, used the original Mini Cooper as the getaway car of choice.Having seen the light of day in 1959, the Mini was only a decade old then but had already won the hearts and minds of generations, with a devoted fan following across all strata of society, from the hip housewife to the hippie roadtripper. In fact, in 1999 the Mini was voted the second most influential car of the 20th century after the Ford Model T.The Mini was designed by Sir Alec Issigonis. It stood out as a fresh new automotive design because it had a front wheel drive layout (not the norm then as it is today) which eliminated the need for a propeller shaft and a rear differential; hence the floor of the passenger cabin could be flat which meant more room for baggage and passengers.Its simplistic design and practicality ensured the car was an immediate hit. From easy transport for grannies to winning Monte Carlo rallies, the car performed every role with equal panache and soon became an icon of British motoring in the 1960's.The 'Cooper' attachment came in 1961 when John Newton Cooper, a Britisher who tinkered about with cars to make them race and rally worthy, souped up the humble Mini to make it the Mini Cooper; a race and rally car to reckon with-a sort of Clarke Kent to superman.The Mini Cooper convertible does sport four seats but there will always be a scramble for the front seats Today, Cooper Car Company that John Cooper coowned with his father Charles Cooper, has been rechristened John Cooper works, and like the Mini, is now a wholly-owned sub brand of BMW working exclusively for Mini. Hence the name Mini Cooper.Like its contemporary the Volkswagen Beetle which was the only good thing to come out of Nazi Germany, the Mini too has been rejuvenated in a new avatar. Which means, like the latest model of Volkswagen Beetle, the new Mini Cooper is a modern car that still carries the characteristic design lines that leave no room for doubt about its heritage and lineage.While the Beetle was launched in India two years ago, the Mini Cooper arrived in India this January. It was launched at the annual Auto Expo in four variants-Mini Cooper, Mini Cooper S, Mini Cooper Convertible and Mini Cooper S Countryman. The old-new look cars are priced between Rs 25 and 32 lakh.But let's face it, the Mini Cooper S is a car that you will buy more for passion than purpose and the Mini Cooper convertible even more so. While these cars do serve the purpose of being handy city runabouts that are small and easy to park as the original Mini was conceived; the new Mini Cooper has been built and designed to cater to the ardour of motoring. This is why its 1.6l engine pumps out 184 bhp at 6000 rpm and the car attacks corners with such enthusiasm that you can feel its glee radiating through the steering wheel. It feels planted on straight roads and wraps itself around corners with confidence. It is then that you realise the reason behind big bucks for a small car; simply, more bang for buck. It's a car that loves to be driven and driven hard at that.The Mini Cooper countryman can easily take on the role of a weekend tourerIn the Mini Cooper Convertible (which is more expensive than the Mini Cooper S) the exhaust burble is a beautiful accompaniment to the drive. The most expensive of the lot is the Mini Cooper S Countryman. When the Countryman was revealed to the world many purists considered it sacrilege. First of all it's more like a miniature SUV than a little runabout (read higher ride height hence more ground clearance), secondly it was the first Mini to feature four doors and also a four wheel drive (optional).While the four wheel drive option is not likely to make it to India in the first stage, the Mini Cooper S Countryman is a good option for those who lust after a Mini Cooper but can't get past having to pay so much for just two doors and essentially two seats. The Countryman will seat four in comfort and five at a squeeze. The company also claims that the boot space between the hatch and the rear seats is generous and that its rear space will give the BMW X1 a run for its money.The best bit: even with these proportions it doesn't compromise on the fun to drive characteristic. And let's not forget, you're finally in the league of legends that brag ageless sensibilities and timeless appeal. Under the hoodThe S variants feature engines that are tuned to deliver 184bhp at 6000 rpm. The standard Mini Cooper engine turns out 124 bhp at 6000rpm.The Mini Cooper S will do 0 to 100kph in 7.2sec while the Mini Cooper will do the same in 10.4. The figures would be marginally higher for the Countryman given the extra weight.Price: Mini Cooper: Rs 24.9 lakhs; Mini Cooper S: Rs. 27.9 lakh; Mini Cooper Convertible: Rs. 29.9 lakh; Mini Cooper S Countryman: Rs. 31.9 lakh (all prices are ex-showroom Delhi)advertisementadvertisementlast_img

GORD DOWNIE TO RECEIVE ALLAN SLAIGHT HUMANITARIAN AWARD

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first_imgAdvertisement TORONTO — Gord Downie is the recipient of this year’s Allan Slaight Humanitarian Spirit Award.The former Tragically Hip frontman, who died in 2017, will be recognized for his dedication to promoting reconciliation, encouraging Canadians to learn more about Indigenous history, and his commitments to the environment.The award will be presented to members of the Downie family at the Canadian Music and Broadcast Industry Awards gala dinner, part of Canadian Music Week in Toronto, on May 9. Facebook Login/Register With: Advertisement CMW president Neill Dixon said the honour will recognize the “compassion and determination” of Downie’s efforts, which included co-founding the Gord Downie & Chanie Wenjack Fund in 2016.Downie also served on the board of Lake Ontario Waterkeeper, a charity that works to protect the Great Lakes, and he raised money alongside his Hip bandmates for local organizations in their Kingston, Ont. hometown.Last year, Arcade Fire received the humanitarian award, while other past recipients include Sarah McLachlan, Chantal Kreviazuk and Raine Maida, Rush, Bryan Adams and Bruce Cockburn. Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Twitterlast_img

Ontario NDP leader Horwarth says more consultation needed with First Nations

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first_imgAPTN National NewsOntario’s provincial election is three weeks away.Oct. 6 is the day voters decide if Dalton McGuinty will serve another term as premier.So, what do party leaders have planned for Aboriginal people in the province?APTN National News reporter Donna Smith speaks with the NDP’s leader Andrea Horwath in Toronto.last_img