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Beckham set to ‘retire’ from football

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first_img0Shares0000LONDON, England, May 16- David Beckham is set to retire from football, bringing an end to a glittering career on the field the Daily Mail is reporting.Since his debut for Manchester United two decades ago, the 38-year-old has emerged as arguably the most iconic sportsman of his generation, captaining his country, collecting 115 caps, and celebrated as a champion in four different countries – the only British footballer in history to do so. Despite the offer of an extended one-year deal at Paris Saint-German, sources in Paris have told Sportsmail that the 38-year-old has played his last game, bowing out on a high after helping Carlo Ancelotti’s side win the French title for the first time in 19 years.When approached for comment by the Daily Mail, Beckham’s representative was today unavailable.The trailblazing midfielder – who played for some of the biggest clubs in the world such as Manchester United, Real Madrid, AC Milan and Los Angeles Galaxy – is now set to continue his ambassadorial duties with a variety of organisations, which include Sky Sports, adidas, Unicef and promoting football in China.Having relocated from LA in January, Beckham is expected to set up a permanent base in London with his wife Victoria and children, Brooklyn, Romeo, Cruz and Harper.His vast fortune of an estimated £165million comfortably makes him the richest athlete ever in British sport, with a host of lucrative sponsorship deals and salary payments over the last decade amassing his wealth.Born in Leytonstone, Beckham started out with Ridgeway Rovers before being singled out by Manchester United legend Sir Bobby Charlton at a Soccer School in Barcelona.At 14, he signed schoolboy terms at Old Trafford and joined the likes of Gary Neville, Paul Scholes and Nicky Butt in United’s famous youth class of 1992, going on to make his first-team debut against Brighton in the League Cup that same year.– DailyMail0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img

Photo library: Tourism and leisure 19

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first_img{loadposition tc}Click on a thumbnail for a low-resolution image, or right-click on the link below it to download a high-resolution copy of the image.» Download Tourism & Leisure contact sheet (1.1MB) » Download full image library contact sheet (10.5MB) North West province: Refreshments at a hotel in the Sun City entertainment complex.Photo: Hannelie Coetzee, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image North West province: Hotel at the Sun City entertainment complex. Photo: Hannelie Coetzee, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image North West province: Hotel at the Sun City entertainment complex. Photo: Hannelie Coetzee, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image North West province: Hotel at the Sun City entertainment complex. Photo: Hannelie Coetzee, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image North West province: Hotel at the Sun City entertainment complex. Photo: Hannelie Coetzee, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image North West province: Hotel at the Sun City entertainment complex. Photo: Hannelie Coetzee, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image North West province: Hotel at the Sun City entertainment complex. Photo: Hannelie Coetzee, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image North West province: Hotel at the Sun City entertainment complex. Photo: Hannelie Coetzee, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image North West province: Hotel at the Sun City entertainment complex. Photo: Hannelie Coetzee, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res imageTOURISM AND LEISURE 19:{loadposition tourism}Having trouble downloading high-resolution images? Queries about using the image library? Email Mary Alexander at marya@mediaclubsouthafrica.com.last_img

Heritage agency charts new course

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first_imgThe Johannesburg City Hall is a colonial architectural jewel in the heart of the city. It boasts a beautiful pipe organ, which was until a few years ago, the largest in the world. A wooden traveling chest with iron banding and lined with blue marbled paper which can be viewed at Groote Schuur in Cape Town. (Images: Sahris) MEDIA CONTACTS • Nicholas Wiltshire   Sahris Project Manager  +27 21 462 4502 RELATED ARTICLES • Trekker site gets heritage status • Africa takes charge of its heritage • Capturing our heritage on camera • New deal to protect Mapungubwe siteTiisetso TlelimaA first of its kind in the world, Sahris, the South African Heritage Resources Agency’s new online heritage resource, catalogues South African historical sites and offers users a unique platform that displays the diversity and richness of the country’s heritage resources.Sahris is a database of heritage sites that includes archaeological and paleontological sites, shipwrecks, graves and burial grounds, battlefields, buildings, cultural landscapes, meteorites and natural sites. Since its launch on 5 August 2012, 6 550 archive developments dating between the 1980s and 2009 have been uploaded.Over 3 500 declared heritage sites are listed on the portal, including the country’s 24 national heritage sites. Notable listings range from Robben Island in the Western Cape to Mapungubwe in Mpumalanga, Kaditshwene in North West, the Sara Bartmann site in Eastern Cape and the Voortrekker Monument in Gauteng.“Recording our past is an important part of our present as it is an essential key to people’s sense of identity,” explained Nicholas Wiltshire, the project manager of Sahris at the South African Heritage Resources Agency (Sahra). Heritage resources were not renewable and arguably we had a much bigger challenge to record these resources than our natural environment, he added.“Documenting and preserving our heritage makes all of our lives more meaningful and we have a lot to learn from our ancestors. For instance, studies in human evolution would not be possible without proper archives being maintained by heritage custodians.”Integrated management systemApproximately 855 people have registered to use the system thus far, and the site’s traffic has grown from 6 000 page views since launch to just over 36 000 page views in November last year.Sahris is the first system in the world where users can view developments in their area and comment on them online. More than 21 000 heritage sites can be viewed, with thousands more still to be loaded this year. These sites contain detailed research information and over a terabyte of photographs have been uploaded and are shared freely under the Creative Commons Licence.It also lists thousands of heritage objects, moveable cultural heritage, declared as such by Sahra in order to control their export. Thousands of heritage impact assessments, together with the Sahra Records of Decision for each proposal, are now easily available online in PDF format, with descriptions.The site provides a heritage management tool to all heritage bodies and custodians of heritage as well as to local planning authorities and provincial heritage resources authorities. “The system enables efficient and co-ordinated management of our heritage and the maximisation of benefit to be attained from our heritage resources by appropriate promotion and use of these resources,” explained Wiltshire.“Ultimately, we would like every South African to use Sahris in some way to learn about their heritage and to engage in the democratic and transparent planning system established in Sahris.” As an integrated management system, it also allows heritage managers to carry out their duties stipulated under the National Heritage Resources Act (NHRA) of 1999, which replaced the old National Monuments Act.Free open source softwareIt took 10 years for the database to be created because at R50-million (about $5.7m), the initial quote for the software was too high. There were also very few people who had the necessary heritage skills blended with a sufficient knowledge of IT to take the project forward, added Wiltshire.The first phase of Sahris was concluded between 2005 and 2006, after a thorough investigation and public participation formulated the scope of what would need to be included. Unfortunately, the quotes for phase two – the actual development of the database – ranged from R18m to R50m. This significantly increased the risks of failure.Three attempts to establish Sahris failed between 2005 and 2011. To achieve the level of functionality required by the NHRA, it is only the recent software revolution created by the open source community around such platforms as Drupal, Joomla, WordPress and others, that has made Sahris possible.“Over the last five years, free open source content management systems have undergone a revolution, with Wikipedia being a notable example of a major success,” said Wiltshire. “This paved the way for a radically different way of solving the development problem for Sahris.”Drupal, the largest free open source content management system, was chosen and the first version of the portal was completed in a little over three months before debugging and testing. This was possible as most of the coding is handled by the modules provided by the Drupal Community. The developer at Sahra applied the modules in a particular configuration for Sahris rather than wrote code from scratch, explained Wiltshire.The portal also has a fully integrated geographic information system (GIS) making use of two modules, called Open Layers and G-map. These modules allow live mapping and input of spatial information into Sahris.“We are running a dedicated map server called Geoserver, which is also a free open source software, and we use this server to help shape up files and spatial overlays such as the latest development footprints and cadastral information,” said Wiltshire. “Sites and developments are seamlessly overlaid and the GIS modules allow the user to navigate information spatially and visually across the landscape.”Although the portal doesn’t document oral histories unless these are related to the history of sites, landscapes or objects, Wiltshire has high expectations that it will cater for more of these forms of records in the future.last_img

Electronics factory boost for W Cape

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first_img13 March 2013 South African technology company Tellumat has opened a fully modernised electronics factory in Atlantis north of Cape Town, following a multi-million rand investment supported by the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) and the Industrial Development Corporation. Speaking at the opening event on Tuesday, Trade and Industry Minister Rob Davies reiterated the government’s commitment to support companies that contribute to the South African economy and job creation. “This state-of-the-art facility that we see today was made possible amongst others by the manufacturing investment grant of R2.64-million for a capital outlay of R12-million to resuscitate the old Tedelex factory,” Davies said. “The company has also benefited from an Industrial Development Corporation loan of R8.2-million for surface mounting technology expansion for this facility.” According to Tellumat CEO Rasheed Hargey, the factory was modernised with new production equipment in 2012, enabling it to produce electronics for brands such as Sony, Mecer and HiSense. Tellumat acquired the assets of the old Tedelex television factory in Atlantis in 2010, and continued to operate from the old facility until the end of last year, when it moved into the new facility. Hargey said the facility represented a significant investment in South Africa’s manufacturing sector and would be a major boost for the development of Atlantis. “We currently have a staff complement of 116, and we wish to have more as we grow as a company,” Hargey said. “The factory is an illustrative example of co-operation between the government and business partners to attract private sector investment through an enabling environment and industry-supporting incentives.” Western Cape Premier Helen Zille, also present at Tuesday’s opening, said it was wonderful to see South Africans on the cutting edge of technology, where the future of job creation lay in the country. “Technology is an important field with the potential to improve education and government and generally to transform the way we live,” Zille said. “We must make sure that government steps up to the plate to assist business to take advantage of strong and growing export markets in Africa, which the Western Cape is well poised to do.” According to the DTI, the electrotechnical sector accounts for at least 12.5% of South Africa’s gross domestic product (GDP). SAinfo reporterlast_img

Video: What Can You Do With Enterprise 2.0 Tools Today That You Couldn’t Do A Year Ago?

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first_img3 Areas of Your Business that Need Tech Now klint finley IT + Project Management: A Love Affair Related Posts Dice asked the participants at Enterprise 2.0 Santa Clara an interesting question: what can you do with enterprise 2.0 tools today that you couldn’t do a year ago? Listening to the responses, three themes surface: adoption, awareness and integration. Much of the improvement we’ve seen in the past year comes not from new tools, but a better awareness of the tools and more people actually using them. The biggest technological change in the past year seems to be more integration between various tools. Adoption – Sure Yammer was available more than a year ago. And before that you could use enterprise IM for real-time communication, and private IRC servers even before that. But if tools aren’t being used, then there isn’t any value.Awareness – Enterprise 2.0 is no longer a fringe idea. As Gil Yehuda points out in the video, business stakeholders are considering enterprise 2.0 solutions for real business problems without having to be sold on the idea of social media first. This is helped by more companies going vertical and/or targeting specific use cases, as Chris Yeh of PBWorks says. Integration – From a technological standpoint, the biggest change of the year has been more interoperation between products. Ross Mayfield talked about Socialtext Connect‘s ability to connect “enterprise 1.0” solutions with enterprise 2.0 solutions. We’d add SocialCast and SimplyBox to that list.We’ve also seen more and more vendors either integrate with each other, like Xobni and Huddle or integrate with SharePoint (many innovation management products are doing that.What can YOU do now that you couldn’t do a year ago?What about you? What can you do now that you couldn’t a year ago? I was surprised not to hear anything about mobile clients or iPads. And I suspect if we were to ask that question this time next year, we’ll all be talking about analytics, but it’s probably still a little too early for that. Massive Non-Desk Workforce is an Opportunity fo... Tags:#enterprise#Trends Cognitive Automation is the Immediate Future of...last_img

Monarchs in Mexico recovering from record low numbers

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first_imgThe number of monarch butterflies wintering in Mexico is up for the second year in a row but their famous migration remains imperiled, researchers said in a press conference in Mexico City today. Every year, millions of butterflies journey from their breeding grounds in the U.S. Midwest and Canada to their winter habitat in the oyamel fir and pine forests of central Mexico. Beginning in 1993, researchers have ventured into those forests and measured the total area covered by the butterflies, the established proxy for their numbers. According to the most recent survey, conducted in December 2015 and released today, monarchs covered 4 hectares of forest this winter. That’s nearly four times more area than the 1.13 hectares the butterflies occupied last year, indicating that the population continues to rebound from the all-time recorded low of 0.67 hectares in the winter of 2013–14. But monarch numbers remain low compared with the late 1990s and early 2000s, when the butterflies often covered 8 hectares or more. The main threat to the butterflies’ 4000-kilometer journey continues to be the loss of milkweed in the United States, says Omar Vidal, the director general of the World Wildlife Fund Mexico, which administers the annual count. Monarchs lay their eggs exclusively on milkweed, which used to thrive in between rows of crops in farmers’ fields. But since farmers have adopted herbicide-resistant corn and soybeans, they have been able to spray their fields with powerful chemicals that have all but wiped out milkweed where the monarchs need it most.last_img

Latin America’s lost histories revealed in modern DNA

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first_imgBritish ships often harassed Spanish galleons, which ferried long-forgotten peoples to Latin America, including enslaved Filipinos and former Jews. Juan Esteban Rodríguez, a graduate student in population genetics at the National Laboratory of Genomics for Biodiversity (LANGEBIO) in Irapuato, Mexico, initially planned to study a recent thread in the global tapestry that is Mexican ancestry. Starting in the 19th century, many Chinese immigrants moved to Mexico to construct railroads in the country's northern states. Growing up near the U.S. border, Rodríguez knew this history well, and he wanted to see whether he could identify the Chinese immigrants' genetic contribution to the modern Mexican population.But when he searched a database of 500 Mexican genomes—initially assembled for biomedical studies—and sought genetic variants more common in Asian populations, he found a surprise. Some people from northern Mexico did have significant Asian ancestry, but they weren't the only ones. Rodríguez discovered that about one-third of the people sampled in Guerrero, the Pacific coastal state that lies nearly 2000 kilometers south of the U.S. border, also had up to 10% Asian ancestry, significantly more than most Mexicans. And when he compared their genomes to those of people in Asia today, he found that they were most closely related to populations from the Philippines and Indonesia.Rodríguez and his adviser, Andrés Moreno-Estrada, a population geneticist at LANGEBIO, turned to the historical record to figure out who these people's ancestors might be. They learned from historians who study ship manifests and other trade documents that during the 16th and 17th centuries, Spanish galleons sailed between Manila and the port of Acapulco in Guerrero, carrying goods and people, including enslaved Asians. Although historians knew of this transpacific slave trade, the origins of its victims were lost. Once they landed in Mexico, they were all recorded as "chinos"—Chinese, says Moreno-Estrada, who will present the work this weekend at the American Association of Physical Anthropologists (AAPA) annual meeting here. "We're uncovering these hidden stories of slavery and people who lost their identities when they disembarked in a whole new country."Other researchers study the legacy of another marginalized group in colonial Mexico: Africans. Tens of thousands of enslaved and free Africans lived in Mexico during the 16th and 17th centuries, outnumbering Europeans, and today almost all Mexicans carry about 4% African ancestry. The percentage is much higher in some communities, says geneticist María Ávila-Arcos of the International Laboratory for Human Genome Research in Juriquilla, Mexico. She found that in Afro-descendent communities in Guerrero and Oaxaca, many of which remain isolated, people had about 26% African ancestry, most of it from West Africa.Other data also suggest a strong African presence in colonial Mexico. Bioarchaeologist Corey Ragsdale of Southern Illinois University in Edwardsville and his colleagues examined skeletons for dental and cranial traits that tend to be more common among Africans. They estimated that 20% to 40% of the people buried in cemeteries in Mexico City between the 16th and 18th centuries had some African ancestry, as they will present this weekend at the AAPA meeting. "It could be that Africans played as much of a role in developing population structure, and in fact developing the [Spanish] empire, as Europeans did," Ragsdale says.Ávila-Arcos hopes to use genetic data to trace the ancestors of those in her study back to specific West African groups or regions. She's also found significant Asian ancestry in some of her volunteers, likely an echo of communities once formed by enslaved Africans and Asians on the Pacific coast.Some Europeans carried hidden histories with them to colonial Latin America. A preprint recently posted on the bioRxiv server used genetic data from more than 6500 people born in Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, and Peru to tease apart how specific Native American groups and multiple populations from the Iberian peninsula contributed to modern genomes. "It's undoubtedly the most comprehensive genetic analysis of Latin American populations to date," Ávila-Arcos says. (The authors declined to comment because the paper has been submitted to a peer-reviewed journal.) One striking finding was that genetic variants common in the eastern Mediterranean and North Africa, and especially in Sephardic Jews, show up all over Latin America, in nearly a quarter of the individuals sampled.The authors, led by geneticists Andrés Ruiz-Linares of Fudan University in Shanghai, China, and Garrett Hellenthal of University College London, trace a significant portion of this ancestry to conversos, or Jews who converted to Christianity in 1492, when Spain expelled those who refused to do so. Conversos were prohibited from migrating to the Spanish colonies, though a few are known to have made the trip anyway. But widespread Sephardic ancestry in Latin America implies that migration was much more common than records suggest.For Ragsdale, the work serves as a reminder that even migrations scientists think are well understood can contain surprises. "The way we think about colonization is simplified," Ragsdale says. "We're missing a lot of subtleties here." Latin America’s lost histories revealed in modern DNA By Lizzie WadeApr. 12, 2018 , 2:00 PMcenter_img Este artículo está disponible en español.AUSTIN—If you walked the cobblestone streets and bustling markets of 16th and 17th century Mexico City, you would see people born all over the world: Spanish settlers on their way to mass at the cathedral built atop Aztec ruins. Indigenous people from around the Americas, including soldiers who had joined the Spanish cause. Africans, both enslaved and free, some of whom had been among the first conquistadors. Asians, who traveled to Mexico on Spanish galleons, some by choice and some in bondage. All these populations met and mingled for the first time in colonial Latin America.Historical documents describe this cultural mixture, but now international teams of researchers are enriching our view by analyzing the genomes of people today. Aided by sophisticated statistics and worldwide genetic databases, they can tease apart ancestry and population mixing with more nuance than ever before. The results, reported at a meeting here this week and in a preprint, tell stories of Latin America that have been largely forgotten or were never recorded in historical documents. 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THE CAPTURE OF THE SPANISH GALLEON ‘NUESTRA SEÑORA DE COVADONGA’, 20 APRIL 1743, CLEVELEY, JOHN THE YOUNGER (1747–86)/SHUGBOROUGH HALL, STAFFORDSHIRE, U.K./NATIONAL TRUST PHOTOGRAPHIC LIBRARY/BRIDGEMAN IMAGES last_img