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Parks Tennis Finals are held at Galway Lawn Tennis Club

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first_imgWinner: Rachel Kelly from Maree; The Runner Up was Niamh Forkan from Roscam.U10 Boys:Winner: Dylan Waterson from Barna; The Runner Up was Ross Moran, from Roscam.U12 Girls:Winner:  Alannah Monaghan from Maree; The Runner Up was Laura Turner, from Tuam.U12 Boys:Winner: Seamus Fallon from Maree; The Runner Up was Shane Heffernan, from Tuam.U14 Girls:Winner: Amy Connolly from Maree; The Runner Up was Emma Dillon from Barna.U14 Boys:Winner: Sean Connolly from Maree; The Runner Up was Kaelen Zipoli from Barna.The Dempsey Cup winner for Sportsmanship was awarded to Laura Turner from Tuam Tennis Clubprint WhatsApp Facebook Twitter Email U10 Girls: The Parks Tennis Finals are the culmination of a month long series of coaching camps at eight different venues around the county with the winners qualifying for the finals that were held today at Galway Lawn Tennis Club. Finals were held in Boys and Girls competitions from under 10 to under 14.last_img

A continent in midst of ‘seismic shift’

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first_imgA spectacular increase in global flows into Africa and Middle East funds supports experts’ view that the economic balance of power is shifting as “frontier economies” increasingly drive growth.The centre of economic gravity is shifting eastwards and southwards with “huge consequences” for the world we live in, according to John Battersby, the UK country manager for the International Marketing Council of South Africa. Speaking after a May international media forum in Johannesburg, Battersby said the global power balance was changing: emerging countries were more rightly called “high growth”.Click here to get the full story from Fund Strategy.last_img

WordPress Takes On SixApart With Enterprise Edition and WordPress.com

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first_imgBut while international support is expanding, WordPress isn’t immune to the problemsof operating in China – where WordPress is blocked.WordPress WidgetsOne of the more promising areas of growth in WordPress is widgets, or mini web appsthat WordPress users can plug into their blog. As of now there are 247 widgets. Around 15-20 of these are availablein the wordpress.com service. Toni told me that most widgets are created by externaldevelopers. Basically this involves developing a WordPress plugin and then widgetizing itin an HTML wrapper.SummaryIt’s pretty plain that Automattic is taking on SixApart with both the EnterpriseEdition and the continued growth and expansion of wordpress.com. Right now SixApart hasthe lead in marketing and probably resources, but WordPress is a strong innovator and hasan open source platform to attract developers. This little battle is far from over andit’ll be interesting to watch it unfold! Toni said there is a developer ecosystem around wordpress, which was donewithout putting commercialism around it – e.g. he notes that themes have links back tothe designers. He also told me there is a lot of innovation happening in the wordpressplatform in general – for example the plugins. The fact that WordPress.org is open sourceis also a factor in the growth of the product, said Toni.Of course you will hear a different story from SixApart, but my general impression isthat WordPress has the advantage in innovation – but TypePad is seen as a slicker andmore user-friendly product for the masses.International ExpansionOne of the more interesting aspects of wordpress.com is its international usage. Whileenglish is the number 1 language used, there are a multitude of other languages supported – and WordPressusers are encouraged to translate more.Spanish is the second most popular language currently – and indeed 4 of the top 10Wordpress.com blogs are Spanish. Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic... While I was in San Francisco I sat down to talk to Toni Schneider, CEO of Automattic Inc – the company set up to leverage thepopular open source blogging tool WordPress. Oneof their main projects is WordPress.com, described as “a more limited version ofWordPress that is hosted and completely maintained.” It’s pretty much the equivalent ofTypePad, the hosted blogging service offered by Automattic’s main competitorSixApart.KnowNow WordPress Enterprise EditionThe competition with SixApart was stepped up today when Toni announcedon his blog a partnership with enterprise RSS vendor KnowNow, for a new product called KnowNow WordPress Enterprise Edition(KWEE). It’s an enterprise version of WordPress and comes just a month after SixApartannounced Movable Type Enterprise 1.5, which we profiled onRead/WriteWeb. Toni told me that KWEE is an enterprise package of WordPress MU (themulti-user version of WordPress) – with additional enterprise functionality bundled in.So for example KWEE comes with LDAP, Automattic’s spam solution Akismet and a statspackage. KnowNow will market the product to their existing base of enterprise customers –and any improvements that KnowNow makes to the WordPress product itself, will be releasedback as open source.I asked Toni will it be a hosted service? He said it will be available as both ahosted service (by KnowNow) or customers can install it on their own servers.Stats about WordPress.comAs far as WordPress.com goes, Toni reeled off some impressive stats. It gets 18million unique visitors per month and 70 M page views. There are over 480,000 blogshosted on wordpress.com. He also said there are an estimated 1-2 million WordPressinstallations that are self-hosted. Toni told me the fact that wordpress.com is ad-freeis a big part of the reason why people use it.Comparison to TypepadI asked Toni how wordpress.com compares to Typepad. He said that Typepad has similartraffic to wp.com, although he says wp.com is about to pass Typepad (at least accordingto Alexa). Here is the latest Alexa chart: 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market richard macmanuscenter_img A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai... Tags:#Publishing Services#web Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Related Posts last_img

Sun’s light touch explains asteroids flying in formation behind Mars

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first_img Sun’s light touch explains asteroids flying in formation behind Mars NASA/JPL-Caltech Artist’s concept of an asteroid breaking up under the strain of its own spin. The power of sunlight appears to be simultaneously creating and destroying families of asteroids, according to a new study of Mars’s Trojans, asteroids that accompany the planet like planes flying in formation. The result, reported yesterday at the American Astronomical Society’s Division for Planetary Sciences meeting in Provo, Utah, solves a minor mystery and could explain the creation of asteroid families in other parts of the solar system.Mars’s Trojans share the same orbit as the Red Planet but always stay either 60° ahead of or behind it, at the so-called fourth and fifth Lagrange points (L4 and L5). There, the asteroids orbit the planet at the exact same rate as it orbits the sun. As a result, the asteroids’ orbits are stabilized by gravitational interactions with both the sun and the planet. Trojan asteroids are most commonly associated with Jupiter, which has more than 6000. Among the inner planets, only Mars has known Trojans—10 of them, the biggest measuring about 2 kilometers across.Mars’s Trojans have puzzled astronomers. Rather than being randomly dispersed, nine out of 10 lie in L5, trailing the planet. What’s more, all but one of these trailing Trojans whiz along in very similar orbits, suggesting that they were once bits of the largest member of the group, Eureka. Normally, such a family of asteroids would be attributed to another asteroid colliding with the biggest member. But the orbits of Eureka’s family are so similar that only an incredibly gentle and, hence, unlikely collision could have done the trick, says Apostolos Christou, a research astronomer at Armagh Observatory and Planetarium in Armagh, Northern Ireland.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D'IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People's Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People's Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Now, however, Christou and his colleagues say they have solved the mystery. Instead of emerging from an impact, Eureka’s progeny appear to have formed through a well-known phenomenon called the Yarkovsky-O’Keefe-Radzievskii-Paddack (YORP) effect, in which an asteroid “spins up” to ever faster rotation speeds because of an imbalance of radiation pressures: from sunlight striking its surface and from the infrared light its warm surface radiates back into space. “Eventually there comes a time where all the bits that make up the asteroid cannot stay together and start flying off,” Christou says. “For lack of a better term I call these bits YORPlets.”But if this happened with Eureka, why don’t Mars’s two other Trojan asteroids also have families? In one case, Christou says, the asteroid appears to be tumbling chaotically, preventing the relatively small forces of the YORP effect from adding up. In the other case, the asteroid may be spinning fast enough to throw off YORPlets, but any would quickly disperse into unrelated orbits because its parent asteroid lies close to the edge of the Trojan stability zone. Their migration out of this zone would be the result of another radiation-pressure effect known as the Yarkovsky effect, which, instead of changing an asteroid’s spin, changes its orbit. “So radiation forces, namely Yarkovsky and YORP, can create, but also evict, asteroids from the martian Trojan clouds,” Christou says.The new explanation "sounds very reasonable to me,” says Humberto Campins, an asteroid researcher at the University of Central Florida in Orlando, who was not involved in the study. The YORP effect, he adds, may also play a role with near-Earth asteroids, explaining why so many of them come in pairs or groups of three.Learning more about the martian Trojans might also prove useful for future space exploration, Campins notes. “These could be resources for trips to Mars," he says. “If they have hydrated minerals then you can exploit those for fuel. [They] could useful on the way to Mars—or on the way back.” By Richard LovettOct. 20, 2017 , 4:40 PMlast_img

Top stories: Two new letters for the genetic code, stat checking psychology, and the formerly abominable snowman

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first_img Top stories: Two new letters for the genetic code, stat checking psychology, and the formerly abominable snowman By Roni DenglerDec. 1, 2017 , 3:25 PM Scientists just added two functional letters to the genetic codeAll life forms on Earth use the same genetic alphabet of the bases A, T, C, and G—nitrogen-containing compounds that constitute the building blocks of DNA and spell out the instructions for making proteins. Now, scientists have developed the first bacterium to use extra letters, or unnatural bases, to build proteins. The traditional four DNA bases code for 20 amino acids, but the addition of new letters X and Y could produce up to 152 amino acids, which might become building blocks for new drugs and novel materials, the scientists say.China’s dark matter space probe detects tantalizing signalSign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D'IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People's Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People's Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)A long-standing challenge in physics has been finding evidence for dark matter, the stuff presumed to make up a substantial chunk of the mass of the universe. Its existence seems to be responsible for the structure of the universe and the formation and evolution of galaxies. But physicists have yet to observe this mysterious material. Results reported Wednesday by a China-led space science mission provide a tantalizing hint—but not firm evidence—for dark matter.Controversial software is proving surprisingly accurate at spotting errors in psychology papersWhen Dutch researchers developed an open-source algorithm named statcheck to flag statistical errors in psychology papers, it received mixed reactions from the research community—especially after the free tool found that tens of thousands of published papers contained statistical inconsistencies. Some scientists have called these studies a “form of harassment,” and others have questioned the accuracy of the tool itself. Now, a new study by statcheck’s developers—posted to a preprint server this week—suggests their algorithm gets it right in more than 95% of cases. Expect that result to be checked.Ancient flying reptiles cared for their young, fossil trove suggestsA spectacular fossil find is providing tantalizing new clues about the habits of pterosaurs, ancient flying reptiles that lived at the same times as dinosaurs. The cache of more than 200 fossil eggs found with bones of juvenile and adult animals in northwestern China suggests to some researchers that pterosaur parents may have cared for their newly hatched young. In a paper published Thursday in Science, researchers report that a 3-meter-square chunk of rock they excavated contains 16 eggs with the fossilized bones of developing embryos.So much for the abominable snowman. Study finds ‘yeti’ DNA belongs to bearsHikers in Tibet and the Himalayas need not fear the monstrous yeti—but they’d darn well better carry bear spray. Previous genetic analyses of a couple of “yeti” hair samples collected in India and Bhutan suggested that a stretch of their mitochondrial DNA resembled that of polar bears. That finding hinted that a previously unknown type of bear, possibly a hybrid between polar bears and brown bears, could be roaming the Himalayas. Now, DNA analyses of nine samples purported to be from the “abominable snowman” reveal that eight actually came from various species of bears native to the area.center_img (Left to right): The Yeti, illustration from "Monsters and Mythic Beasts" 1975 (color litho), D'Achille, Gino (1935–2017)/Private Collection/Bridgeman Images; James Cavallini/Science Source; Chuang Zhou last_img

Cornell nutrition scientist resigns after retractions and research misconduct finding

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first_img Wikimedia Commons By Kelly ServickSep. 21, 2018 , 11:25 AM Cornell nutrition scientist resigns after retractions and research misconduct finding Brian Wansink, the Cornell University nutrition researcher known for probing the psychology behind human eating habits, has resigned after a university misconduct investigation, and following the retraction this week of six of his papers.In a statement issued yesterday, Cornell’s provost, Michael Kotlikoff, said the investigation had revealed “misreporting of research data, problematic statistical techniques, failure to properly document and preserve research results, and inappropriate authorship.”Wansink contested the university’s conclusion in a statement shared with Science, saying, “The interpretation of these four acts of misconduct can be debated, and I did so for a year without the success I expected.” He admitted to mistaken reporting, poor documentation, and “some statistical mistakes,” but maintains that there was “no fraud, no intentional misreporting, no plagiarism, or no misappropriation” in his work. “I believe all of my findings will be either supported, extended, or modified by other research groups,” he added.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D'IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People's Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People's Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) Wansink, who directed Cornell’s Food and Brand Lab, won public attention for headline-friendly findings suggesting that it’s relatively easy to manipulate what people choose to eat—and in what quantities—by tweaking features of their environments. Among the papers retracted by The Journal of the American Medical Association on 19 September are one finding that people ate more calories while watching a stimulating action movie than a tame interview show and another concluding that people given bigger bowls at a Super Bowl party served themselves more calories. Brian Wansink Related content Meet the ‘data thugs’ out to expose shoddy and questionable research But Wansink drew criticism for a 2016 blog post in which he seemed to praise a grad student for massaging negative results into positive ones. Several of his findings were questioned in online analyses published by research integrity watchdogs Nick Brown of the University of Groningen in the Netherlands and James Heathers of Northeastern University in Boston. Thirteen of his papers have now been retracted, and at least 15 more have been formally corrected, according to Retraction Watch.Wansink has been removed from research and teaching, according to Cornell, but he’ll “be obligated to spend his time cooperating with the university in its ongoing review of his prior research.”last_img

R Ashwin breaks Kapil Dev’s record for most Test wickets in home season

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first_imgOff-spinner Ravichandran Ashwin added yet another feather to his cap by becoming the highest wicket-taker in a home Test season. (Scorecard)Ashwin achieved the feat when he snared Mitchell Starc to bundle out Australia for 260 in their first innings on the second day of the ongoing first Test in Pune.You just can't stop @ashwinravi99. Can you? #INDvAUS pic.twitter.com/1wDAdb9889 BCCI (@BCCI) February 24, 2017The lanky Tamil Nadu bowler, who now has 67 wickets from 10 Tests - the most in a home season, surpassed legendary allrounder and former India captain Kapil Dev, who had 63 wickets from 13 matches in the 1979-80 season. Meanwhile, Sri Lanka spinner Muttiah Muralitharan holds the No.3 and No.4 spots with 54 wickets in 2001-02 and 2003-04 seasons, respectively. With one more wicket, Ashwin will break Indian record of most wickets in a season (home + away Tests). He is currently at level with Kumble, who had also taken 64 wickets in 2004-05 season. The Test record is held by South Africa's Dale Steyn, who ended with 78 wickets in 12 matches in 2007-08 season. With a possible seven more innings to bowl in, Ashwin has a good chance to surpass Steyn's tally by the end of the season.Ashwin, who is the reigning world no.1 Test bowler and allrounder, has been the cornerstone of India's Test success on home soil.Ashwin recently became the fastest to 250 Test wickets, going past Dennis Lillee's recrod of 48 Tests by three matches. He is the sixth Indian bowler after Anil Kumble (619), Kapil Dev (434), Harbhajan Singh (417), Zaheer Khan (311), Bishan Singh Bedi (266) to reach to 250 Test wickets.advertisementAshwin already has 24 five-wicket hauls and seven man-of-the-series awards in his bag. He has also scored 1850 runs, including four hundreds.MOST WICKETS IN A HOME SEASON SEASONMATCHESWICKETSAVERAGESTRIKE RATE5WI10WIRavichandran Ashwin (IND)2016-17106724.3951.3663Kapil Dev (IND)1979-80136320.2544.9551Muttiah Muralitharan (SL)2001-0265415.3746.7653Muttiah Muralitharan (SL) 2003-0465417.9448.9852Anil Kumble (IND)2004-0595430.9261.7052last_img