Month: March 2021

The Floozies – Tell Your Mother (Album Review)

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first_imgAre you electrofunky? Well then, it’s time you met The Floozies.Hailing from Lawrence, KS, The Floozies are comprised of brothers Matt Hill (producer/guitarist) and Mark Hill (drummer). With an approach that combines the electro-sensation of EDM with the down-home energy of funk music, The Floozies’ new studio album, Tell Your Mother, is a bona fide digitized dance party that you don’t want to miss.The Floozies were founded in 2009, releasing a steady stream of LPs, EPs, and singles while building their fan-base. Tell Your Mother, which was released earlier this week, is the band’s first album released under Liberator Records, the label owned and operated by funk-producer GRiZ. The band has appeared at numerous festivals in 2013 alone, including Wakarusa Festival, Summer Camp Music Festival, and the Easter Island Music Festival. By all accounts, The Floozies’ live performance is an unforgettable electrofunky celebration.So what exactly is electrofunk? It’s a smooth blend of tension-release EDM beats with elements of old-school funk music, soothing and grooving from start to finish. Tell Your Mother begins with “Ice Cold,” opening onto a soft drum beat (think “Theme from Shaft…” can you dig it?) and a thumping bass-line. This drops into the main section of the song, a balance between bright guitar and heavy synth. The Floozies continuously modulate the synthesizer melodies, bouncing deep, distorted tones off of bright, refreshing ones. And, just as the music builds to a frenzy, “FREEZE!”, leading back into the electrofunky madness.Each song follows this trend, merging funk instrumentation with electronic manipulations to produce music that compels the listener to dance. Hell, I’m bobbing my head as I write this review. The real triumph of Tell Your Mother is in the production, seamlessly merging a diverse array of sounds into full, cohesive songs. It’s an expert blend of guitar, bass, drums, and synthesizer, mixed with vocal tracks that often seem to burst out from the songs. For example, the title track uses a female vocalist, who melodically belts the phrase: “Keep on giving it up!” This hook draws in the listener, and never lets go.Tell Your Mother is one groovy dance party after the next. The Floozies are performing at Terminal 5 next week (11/15), with GRiZ and Pegboard Nerds… the makings of a non-stop-booty-shakin’-spectacular. Manic Focus and Gramatik label mate BRAX will be playing at Live For Live Music’s show at Hudson Terrace right after! You can download Tell Your Mother for free, along with all of the Floozies music, here: http://flooziesduo.com/-David Melamed (@DMelamz) The Floozies – Tell Your MotherIce ColdBoogerbearTell Your MotherLove, Sex, and Fancy ThingsSet BreakOne WordIndubitablySomebody Help MeOh My GawdItalian Chandelierlast_img

System Of A Down Bassist Confirms Band Is Working On New Music

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first_img– Marisa Frydman (@musicalmarisa) Shavo Odadijian, bassist of System Of A Down, says that the band has begun working on new music for the first time in 10 years. In an interview with John Golden of Madcap Music Daily, the bassist answered that the band has in fact been in the recording studio together. We’ve already gone. We’ve written some songs. We’re keeping it to ourselves. We’re getting back to the bullshit of being together.” The band’s last release was their LP Hypnotize, back in 2005. The statement from Odadijian adds fuel to the fire of speculation for a potential new album release from the band. Earlier this year, frontman Serj Tankian stated in regards to the idea of creating new music with System Of A Down, “There has been talk. We are going to play this tour, come back and we’re going to see where we are. If we have songs that work for System, if I have them and Daron (Malakian, guitarist) has them. The openness is there to work together, but we haven’t made any particular plans that we can announce.”This news comes on the heels of their “Wake Up The Souls” tour, announced late last year. In the coming weeks, System Of A Down is set to kick off their upcoming tour in London on April 10th and it will culminate in the band’s first ever show in their homeland of Armenia, commemorating the 100th anniversary of the Armenian genocide. For more tour and ticket information, check out the band’s website.last_img

Tool Continues To Tease Fans

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first_imgTool has been working on new music for the better part of a year (if not longer), and fans are certainly anxious to hear the band’s first new offering since 2006. That’s why, when the band posted a three-word enticing news update, fans hoped that news about the album was imminent.And now, some 26 hours after the initial post, not to mention nine years after 10,000 Years (2006) was released, we’re still waiting for it. The band revealed that a lawsuit was preventing them from making music, but frontman Maynard James Keenan and guitarist Adam Jones have both made it clear that the band is now actively working on a new project.Tool Shares New Music Teasers From The StudioAnyway, it’s time for us to go back to waiting for it…last_img

Incredible Lineup, Dave Grohl’s Throne Highlight Foo Fighters’ 20th Anniversary Celebration

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first_imgThe Foo Fighters celebrated their 20th anniversary with an all-star assemblage at Washington, D.C.’s RFK Stadium on July 4th. Dave Grohl proved that not even a broken leg could stop him from missing the hometown blowout he planned for Foo Fighters’ anniversary. Incredible artists like Buddy Guy, Trombone Shorty, Joan Jett and The Blackhearts, LL Cool J and Heart were tapped to join in the celebration. The day was filled with classic hits from groundbreaking artists, most of who were featured in HBO’s Grohl-directed music doc series, Sonic Highways.D.C.-based rock/hip hop/punk fusion trio, RDGLDGRN (Red, Gold, Green) kicked off the festivities. In 2013, the band recorded their self-titled EP at Sound City Studios in L.A., where they met Grohl who played drums on their track, “I Love Lamp”, from that record.New Orleans’ Trombone Shorty and Orleans Avenue transported the DC crowd straight to Jazz Fest opening with “The Craziest Things.” Shorty traded his signature trombone for a trumpet and wailed on a long solo. They covered Green Day’s “Brain Stew”, replacing verse vocals with Shorty’s signature trombone. A cover of Big Tymers’ “Get Your Roll On” closed out the set.Joan Jett and The Blackhearts rocked their hits, like “Bad Reputation”, “Cherry Bomb”, and “I Hate Myself For Loving You”. Jett covered Tommy James and The Shondells’ “Crimson and Clover,” adding her signature rasp and distortion-heavy arrangement to the classic track.As Jett’s set ended, concert organizers announced severe storms moving into the area, which resulted in an hour and half delay. Once the clouds cleared, however, the first licks of Gary Clark Jr.’s “Bright Lights” echoed through RFK Stadium, beckoning concert-goers back to the stadium field. He followed up with “When My Train Pulls In”, complete with incredible guitar solo, and included a version of his tune, “I’m Gone”.Next up, Rock & Roll Hall of Famers Heart hit the stage, opening their show with “Crazy On You”. Ann and Nancy Wilson affirmed their rock maven status, bringing out all the hits. They played 80s-era tracks like “These Dreams” and “Straight On”, with Ann Wilson strolling the adjoining catwalk, belting out their famous rock anthems and closing with “Barracuda.”Hip hop pioneer LL Cool J opened his set saying, “It feels good to be back in Chocolate City!” before launching into Biz Markie’s hit, “Just A Friend”. The excited D.C. crowd sang along with every word of LL’s 1990 hit, “Mama Said Knock You Out”, creating RFK Stadium’s signature ‘bounce’ effect with stands moving as fans jumped up and down in unison. LL’s “I Need Love” followed, and he finished with “Rock The Bells”, complete with head-spinning break-dancers on either side of the stage.Chicago blues legend Buddy Guy opened his set with “Damn Right I Got The Blues”, and wailed on a teaser of Jimi Hendrix’s “Purple Haze”. Guy remarked of dreary Washington skies and played “Feels Like Rain”, using a drumstick to play his guitar during the solo. He brought out 16 year old protégé, Quinn Sullivan, a gifted guitarist who’s toured with Guy since the age of seven. The two played Cream’s “Strange Brew” and the blues standard “Meet Me In Chicago” to close out the set.Local go-go music heroes Trouble Funk added a taste of D.C.’s unique music culture to the lineup. The band covered Wild Cherry’s “Play That Funky Music” with festival organizer/owner of D.C.’s renowned 9:30 Club, Seth Hurwitz, on drums. Trouble Funk performed their own hits as well, like “Hey Fellas” and “Pump Me Up”, with a snippet of 90s dance hall classic, “It’s Time For The Percolator” by Cajmere.After their set, a large curtain with the Foo Fighters’ logo dropped over the stage. The anxious crowd cheered and turned collective attention to the screens flanking the stage. While fans waited for the band’s arrival, clips from HBO’s Sonic Highways series ran, spotlighting artists from the daylong festival’s stellar lineup.When the stage lights went dark, the crowd roared as Dave Grohl’s distinctive scream echoed throughout the stadium. The curtain lifted to reveal Grohl gliding down the catwalk on a motorized throne, adorned with lights and guitar necks-somewhat reminiscent of the Iron Throne a la Game of Thrones, but altered with Foo Fighters’ benchmark kitsch. However, this throne was perfectly suited for the prevailing King of Rock & Roll, Dave Grohl.The show opened chronicling the band’s history of hits, now classics, namely, “Everlong,” “Monkey Wrench,” and, ”The Pretender.”Following the latter, Grohl screamed, “In Washington D.C., on the Fourth of July, people want to rock & roll…Light ‘em up, I want to see these mother fuckers.” House lights came on Grohl addressed his hometown crowd recounting youthful memories of RFK shows and his now famous fall from stage in Sweden where he fractured his leg. In true self-deprecating Grohl style, Dave explained, “We started playing our set… one guess what happened next…I fell off the fucking stage.” He showed the video clip of the fall, lowered and shook his head and said, “show it one more time.” The crowd cheered as Grohl next pointed to preliminary, hand-drawn sketches of his throne on the video screens. He pointed to a photo of himself on a morphine drip and said that he was rather intoxicated while designing his throne, but was not going to miss this show under any circumstances.The band played some covers as well, including  the Queen/Bowie classic “Under Pressure” and pieces of both “Owner Of A Lonely Heart” by Yes and “Another One Bites The Dust” by Queen were teased during band introductions. As they played their hit “Walk”, Grohl stopped in the middle of song to say, “You gotta sing this one with a smile on your face,” referencing lyrics, “Learning to walk, again…” and his severely broken leg.Guitarists Pat Smear and Chris Shiflett accompanied Grohl for acoustic versions of “My Hero” and, “Times Like These,” then the band picked back up with all-out screeching renderings of, “All My Life,” and “This Is A Call.” The set ended with inspirational anthem, “Best Of You,” on which Grohl requested audience participation on vocals.Grohl embraced his D.C. roots, saying that he hopes to hold a Fourth of July blowout at RFK again next year. As one of the hardest working musicians in the business, Grohl vowed not to let his broken leg cause him to miss his D.C. homecoming. Hopefully, by this time next year, Dave will not need a throne to make an entrance fit for a king.last_img

Bill Kreutzmann Added To Jefferson Airplane 50th Anniversary Celebration At Lockn’

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first_imgWhile the Grateful Dead 50th anniversary celebration was well-publicized in the media, another band’s golden anniversary has taken a backseat. Announced several months ago, Jefferson Airplane will celebrate their own 50th anniversary with a one-time-only performance at the Lockn’ Festival. As a new feature in the Daily Beast reveals, Grateful Dead drummer Bill Kreutzmann will join in the festivities as a special guest.The article reveals that, while founding members Jorma Kaukonen and Jack Casady will be in attendance, Grace Slick will not be singing with the band. Festival promoter David Frey confirmed this, saying “Grace is very happily retired and wishes everybody the best… She’s just the coolest ever. But she’s not gonna ever stand on a stage again.”Grace Slick Recalls Life With The Grateful Dead In The 60’sThe article also confirms a number of musicians contributing in the celebration, including “Saturday Night Live guitarist GE Smith, Lake Street Drive’s Rachael Price, Grammy-winning producer and multi-instrumentalist Larry Campbell, Grateful Dead drummer Bill Kreutzmann, and more.”Kreutzmann will also be performing with his own band, Billy & The Kids, at the 2015 festival. While the Jefferson Airplane show is more of a celebration than a reunion, we’re certainly excited for this epic performance.last_img

Remembering When John Mayer Was In A Hilarious Chappelle Show Sketch

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first_imgWith all of the hype surrounding the Dead & Company guitarist John Mayer, we found ourselves reminiscing through Mayer’s provocative past. Despite all of the tabloids featuring Mayer, we couldn’t help but remember the guitarist’s excellent 2004 role in the “Dancing For Different Cultures” segment on The Chappelle Show.John Mayer Impresses At FREE MSG Dead & Company Performance (Video/Full Stream)The premise of Chappelle’s short is that white people can’t resist dancing to electric guitar music. Watch as hilarity ensues!last_img

Forming Like Voltron, Lettuce CRUSHES The Game [Album Review]

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first_imgCurrently operating at the apex of an ever-maniacal prowess, the mad-hatting funk Voltron called Lettuce is an earth-shaking thunderclap. Now grinding for the better part of twenty years, the band is an evolution on display- in real time. This all-star ensemble continues breaking new ground with every leap skyward, all the while paying a respectful homage to their forefathers in song and emotion. With recent album release Crush (dropped November 6th, buy it here), their unparalleled ability to unleash a plethora of original funk and groove styles is on a mighty marquee. The clear and present intention here is danger; moving onward and levitating upward. The record finds Lettuce reinventing themselves within the futuristic netherworlds of bombastic beat science, a band born under the baddest of signs.The band’s approach to songcraft pays magnificent artistic dividends, noting influences like James Brown, yet at the same time, in the words of guitarist Eric Krasno, “morphing through portals of Tower of Power, The Meters, and 1970’s-era Herbie Hancock“. Uniquely different styles converge in a shared obsession with breakbeats and crate digging, an amalgam of study and method of madness that propels the band to towering heights. In 2015, they truly have no equal, with a bludgeoning brand new album, and a documentary feature film (Let Us Play) about to be premiered. Nowadays they personify utter domination; a product of relentless touring, shedding, and shape-shifting the game. With Crush, the boys just keep raising the proverbial bar, a variation on the same one they set when bursting back onto the scene with 2008’s sophomore seminal classic Rage. There has never been a better day to be a Lettuce head, as the band is literally crushing the competition and firing on every available cylinder.Photo by Phierce PhotosAfter shedding the material at Matt Grondin’s brand new Crescent City digs, the Lettuce krewe then were blessed to travel back to the planet of Brooklyn to record the actual tracks that would become Crush. They holed up in the fantastic Studio G, with venerable engineer Joel Hamilton at the helm, the same cat who twisted the knobs for Pretty Lights majestic, Grammy award winning A Color Map of the Sun. Lettuce themselves produced Crush, but no doubt Hamilton and his lair of largesse was a crucial elixir to the creative juice that let the funk flow so viciously.I asked Ryan Zoidis, saxophonist extraordinaire and one-half of the Shady Horns duo, for a little bit of information about the recording process.“We did a writing session in NOLA at Parlor Studio, just before fall tour. We flushed out most of the tunes on the road before we hit the studio. I got my synth rig going around that time too. We recorded analog, live to 2 inch tape. Joel Hamilton possesses a ridonkulous collection of analog gear. The cool thing was, we cut it live and did very little overdubbing. Our original trumpet player Rashawn Ross came back and laced up ‘The Force’, ‘Phyllis’, ‘Get Greazy’ and ‘The Lobbyist’. I attended the mastering session with Adam Ayan at Gateway Mastering near my spot in Portland, Maine.”Photo by Keith GrinerBass player and in-house rock-star Erick “Jesus” Coomes had this to add about the path taken. “We had a lot of pu-erh tea and smoothies, and actually checked out a lot of fine dining.”Album opener “The Force” immediately brings ‘the motherfucking ruckus’ (c)GZA, Adam Deitch’s driving pulse and the Shady Horn’s triumphant blasts announcing that the proverbial sheriff is back in town. Gigantic bottom end from Coomes thunders underneath a rising tide hemmed by the dual axe-attack from Adam “Shmeeans” Smirnoff and Eric Krasno. This first track is a five alarm fire, a search for new land that sets a blistering tone for this focused and diverse smattering of brand new compositions.Photo by Patrick Hughes“Phyllis” known as “Dilla 2” on the band’s setlist for the past couple of years, is the latest in delectable sonic tributes to the late, great hip-hop producer James “J-Dilla” Yancey. Eventually, the number was rechristened “Phyllis” to cement to connection. (Phyllis Diller> J Dilla= “Phyllis”.) This impregnable sure shot is another in the long line of prodigious creations from drummer wunderkind Adam Deitch. He remains a possessed and pulverizing rhythmic machine throughout the record, and especially on “Phyllis”, he provides a telekinetic display of pocket protection while high on a fly society vibe, subtly accentuating the groove with a lyrical approach, drenched in Dillatronics.Jesus Coomes told the homies at Mass Appeal that the song “Is ‘Mr. Yancey’s cousin. She was born in Santa Monica at a beautiful mansion with a studio in the top floor.” Akin to its predecessor, this banger does not directly borrow from the Dilla prospectus. The ethos woven within Deitch’s drumming juxtaposed with The Shady Horns magnificently filtered brass heads, make for an inspired journey that might have one day escaped from Jay-Dee’s Detroit basement sound lab had he lived to continue making his magic. This song, in its unfettered essence, is maybe the most beautiful that Lettuce has ever been.Photo by Patrick HughesKeyboard virtuoso Neal Evans is the unsung hero of this conglomerate. His presence is felt thoroughly throughout Crush, using a variety of plug-ins and patches to attain a unique and mellifluous landscape. Whether sailing away in dissonant clav and psychedelic tones, or underpinning the groove with lush Hammond whirls and washes, the dude is just on another level when it comes to finding and holding his space within the art.Legendary rock journalist Dennis Cook said it best: “Neal Evans is a fluckin’ sorcerer, a conjurer of textures, melodies and crushing basslines that make the air – and folks in listening range – dance. What he does with Hammond Organ, electric Rhodes and more moves with liquid charm, a fluid energy that visibly flows from his flexing, bouncing, character-filled body as he pursues synergy with his gear, fellow musicians, and audience.”Photo by Brandon XuerebLettuce has always spread the love to vocalists who vibe with the collective mission to honor the annals of history. Royal family Nigel Hall (“Sounds Like a Party”) and Alecia Chakour (“He Made a Man Out of Me”) take the vocal reigns for a pair of songs that traverse backwards down a different kind of number line. Each tune spotlights the singer, while Lettuce shows and proves just how effective a support network they can become when there is a lead vocalist at the forefront of the ensemble.The fantastic voyage that is “Trillogy” might be the standout track on the entire record. Each portion is a telltale strand of its author’s musical DNA.Zoidis: “‘Trillogy’ is three different jams that we strung together to make one song. Jesus wrote the first one, I wrote the second one and Deitch wrote the final passage”.During the first section, the spirits of Dr. Dre and DJ Quik are in the building. The lumbering stomp and spooky ascension are as hip-hop as Lettuce’s original music has ever been. It’s crystal clear that Coomes’ City of Angels paws are all over this piece. The Zoidis-penned second section is mysterious; lurking, slowly but surely unveiling its demonic intentions, a smooth riding wave that metastasizes into something downright nasty. This portion of “Trillogy” is a slipknot around the neck.The raucous third section is quite obviously Deitch all day, a screwed-up, trap-house snare break gone AWOL. By the time the band reaches its climax, the mold has officially been broken and the mission more than accomplished.Photo by Patrick Hughes“The New Reel” starts of as a grandiose throwback jam; a terrific testament to the quintessential Creed Taylor groove-merchant styles of the mid 1970s. The rollout is slick and seductive, before dropping into a half-pipe of pure pocket. In a flash, it morphs into a beast all its own, with lavishly luscious guitar licks, syncopated bass and drum conversations, and more of Neal Evans mastery, kissed off by the Shadies. The enigmatic chemistry between Zoidis and trumpet maestro Eric Benny Bloom is on display throughout the album, but the horns really shine here. Bloom’s the newest member of Lettuce, but his skill set and confidence are tantamount to the equation. When the horn break drops, the listener is bouncing from the rafters, the roof, or touching the sky, depending on the environs. This song is an entirely different steez than is found elsewhere on the record, a steady-driving train that arrives at stutterstep station, Evans’ dissonant sound waves taking us home- the sound of a pure unadulterated victory lap.“Silverdome” is a bulbous and brutal display of pure guitar riffage. Krasno’s blues roots and meticulous quest for monster tone set the stage for a workout fortified with magnanimous brass leads. Shmeeans’ dirty deeds are unveiled within the sludge, one part Jimmy Page and the other half Down. The rumbling, demonic Deitch drums are married to a sinister, staggering six-string kamikaze jam; this tune was formerly known as Lett-Zeppelin for blatantly obvious reasoning.Something needs to be said for these interludes, each of them less than a minute long but chock full of head-nodding swagger. The album features four short outtakes of “Phyllis” that are a divine salutation to boom-bap sonics. Deitch’s drums are mic’d in a way that call out to the ghosts of Marley Marl and Pete Rock, with Coomes’ bare bones bass lines walking the fine line between gutter and gangster. The reverb drenched guitar line snakes its way around the beat, and the short samples of sound and fury leave the listener only wondering what might have been.————————————Catch Lettuce at Brooklyn Bowl January 1st & 2nd, following a New Year’s Eve blowout in Chicago with Future Rock and Turbo Suit.————————————Purchase Crush here or stream it below.last_img

Holly Bowling Brilliantly Blends The Music Of Phish & The Grateful Dead On Piano In Tour Finale

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first_imgWith her 2015 debut album Distillation Of A Dream: The Music Of Phish Reimagined For Solo Piano and inaugural fall tour, classically trained pianist Holly Bowling has already etched out quite the reputation for herself. Her solo reworking of some of Phish’s classics and the transcription of epic jams like the Tahoe “Tweezer,” and the Glen Falls “Twist” showcase a mastery and devotion to a band and a craft that few can rival.Members Of String Cheese Incident, Turkuaz, Billy & The Kids, Holly Bowling Announce TourThis past week Bowling concluded her tour with two nights at the Pittsburgh Winery (Nov. 11-12) and proceeded with a pair of wonderfully crafted shows, the finale being billed as a night of Phish AND Grateful Dead songs. Though Bowling had been sprinkling in a few Dead tunes into her sets during the tour including “Bird Song” and “Cassidy,” it all came to a head at the finale in Pittsburgh. Donning an “Only Music Can Save” t-shirt, Bowling strode to the bench with a quiet confidence and grin on her face to a warm, intimately seated crowd at the winery and wasted little time building her first selection of the night, a stunning “Piper” opener. Though there were no audible shouts, there was an unquestionable joy and palpable, yet unspoken energy in the room. You could instantly tell Phish’s music runs deeply through her veins. She then seamlessly transitioned into her transcription of the jam from Phish’s “Twist” performed at The Mann in Philadelphia this past August 2nd, her first “jam transcription” of the night.When Bowling broke out her first Dead tune of the night, the aforementioned “Bird Song,” the silence in the room felt deafening in the best sense of the term, the complete audience locked in. Entranced. The light and breezy tune then turned into the somber, dramatic notes of “The Horse” and it’s natural, uplifting companion, “Silent In The Morning.” After the song’s sparkling outro, Bowling shifted to the Dead’s “Cassidy.” An exuberant performance, Bowling almost came out of her chair during the section that traditionally finds “Flight of the seabirds, scattered like lost words/Wheel to the storm and fly.” The energy was simply awesome.Jazz Is Phish Ft. Members of Dave Matthews Band, Snarky Puppy, Sun Ra – On SaleAn excellent reprisal of “Silent In The Morning” followed and gave way to her second jam transcription of the night, the Dead’s “Eyes Of The World” from their June 18th, 1974 show at Freedom Hall in Louisville, KY, describing it as one of her favorite Dead tunes to play. Certainly one of the most revered versions of the song ever as well as any of their songs, Bowling eloquently handled this monster, hitting all the incredible ebbs and flows the songs has to offer. No doubt one of the highlights of the night.To close out the first set, Bowling kept along with two more songs from Phish’s 1993 album, Rift. A momentous “Horn” fed into “It’s Ice” before Bowling slyly segued into “Crazy Fingers.” Nimble on the ivories as at any point in the night, the song from 1975’s Blues For Allah kept Bowling on her toes with the various shifts in dynamics. And as no version of “It’s Ice” would be complete without the riveting keys-driven climax, Bowling obliged, reprising the structure and ending the set on a very high note.After rubbing elbows with the crowd and enjoying some fine wine at the merch table during intermission, Bowling returned to a re-energized crowd and threw down one of her strongest sets on this tour. Beginning with the hard-hitting, reassuring chords of “Help On The Way,” Bowling then weaved her way through the serpent that is “Slipknot!” It was also as this point that a collection of excellently placed “Bird Song” teases began to appear, including during a version of “Wingsuit.” At one point it was difficult to even decipher where one song was coming and where one was going they were so brilliantly blended. It was a true amusement for the mind. Bowling then unleashed her first live “Dark Star” on the Pittsburgh crowd, giving proper weight and gravity to the selection, offering the many intricacies the song demands. A stirring version of the Dead’s “China Doll” evolved out of “Dark Star” in which she jokingly remarked after the song, “Kinda feel like I need a moment after that. Jerry…Jerry can really get to a person like that.” On this night, it was Bowling who was getting to the crowd like that.Bowling began her final assault of the night with “Harry Hood,” but not before she would toss on a #96 jersey of former Pittsburgh Steelers’ defensive end “Ziggy” Hood and prefacing the tune with a popular Pittsburgh anthem, “Here We Go.” In actuality, it sounded quite natural for an intro. After a beautifully classic “Hood” jam section left unfinished, Bowling came back to the tail end of “Slipknot!” and paid if all off by “rolling away the dew” with an energetic “Franklin’s Tower” and finally coming back to “Feeling Good About Hood.” How could you not after a set like that?Listen To Holly Bowling’s Stunning Cover Of Phish’s ‘Scents & Subtle Sounds’ From Tour OpenerWith Phish’s “Waste” serving as the encore to her final night on tour, Bowling was met with a much deserved ovation. She’s tapped into something very pure and genuine about the spirit of Phish and on this night the Dead, too. Her creativity, hard work and devotion to a dream have lead her to the point she’s at right now and will only propel her further. One can only imagine what’s in store for the future! Listen to complete audio of the show below thanks to taper Steve Toney.[All photos by Ben Petchel] Load remaining imageslast_img

Warren Haynes Is Bringing His Symphonic Jerry Garcia Tribute To Red Rocks, Tanglewood

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first_imgThe Jerry Garcia Symphonic Celebration will return this summer! Warren Haynes has announced two performance dates with the Boston Pops Orchestra and conductor Keith Lockhart, including a show at Tanglewood in Lenox, MA on July 1 and Red Rocks Amphitheatre in Morrison, CO on August 1. Each will celebrate the life and music of the Grateful guitarist Jerry Garcia.Pre-sale tickets go on sale tomorrow, January 20th, at noon local time, with more dates soon to follow.Check out Haynes’ at Red Rocks Amphitheatre back in 2013 playing “Morning Dew” with the Colorado Symphony Orchestra:last_img

SoundCloud’s Future In Jeopardy After Reporting Huge Losses In 2015

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first_imgDespite landing a deal with Universal Music Group only one month ago, the latest financial filings of internet behemoth SoundCloud suggest the end is near.Reported first in Music Business Worldwide, the Berlin-based smusic streaming service pulled in just over $15,250,000 while reporting losses upwards of $44,000,000.In SoundCloud’s three year existence, the losses total nearly $84,928,500, with only about $40,000,000 in income. Employees of the company have been well off, with a 42.5% wage increase to average out nearly $90,500 a year.The report makes it clear that, while the company had “adequate resources to continue in operational existence for the foreseeable future,” SoundCloud was heavily reliant on “further capital investment” to continue operating in 2015.It seems the “landmark” deal with Universal, allowing fans to stream artists such as U2, Taylor Swift and Kanye West for the first time via the service may have come too late.Sony, the only major recording label to not have inked a deal with SoundCloud, may have prevented losses by holding out. SoundCloud’s only saving grace may come from future success of the long-awaited subscription service confirmed last July.According to the Financial Times, SoundCloud auditor KPMG reported that the need for more investment represented “a material uncertainty which may cast significant doubt on the company’s ability to continue as a going concern.”last_img