Tag: 上海不准不开心靠谱吗

Stories to Tell

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first_img(Editor’s note: Golf Channel turns 20 years old on Jan. 17. In recognition, we are looking back at golf over the last two decades with a series of articles and photo galleries throughout the week.) You’ve known me for long enough, so let’s break bread and reminisce on the week of Golf Channel’s 20th anniversary. A few years ago I sat around a table at a Houston steakhouse with Jack Nicklaus, Arnold Palmer, Lee Trevino and Gary Player for a show called “Legendary Conversation.”  It’s a good assignment, if you like golf, which I do. Anyway, at one point I wanted to understand what made Jack so good.  “You’ve won nine majors, Gary,” I said. “And, Arnold, you won seven; Lee, you won six. You guys were among the greatest to have ever played this game.” They all had a slight smile, because legends never mind when you repeat their record.  “So how do you explain …” and now Trevino knows where I’m headed with this and without saying a word he starts pointing toward the ceiling, toward the sky.  “How do you explain Jack winning 18 majors?” I finished the question – and I really emphasized the number 18. Trevino, still thrusting his index finger to the roof, says, “He hit the high ball, hit it so high and could land it so soft, see that’s how you win 18 majors.” Tiger Woods looked like he’d win 25 majors. Sunday afternoon at the 2001 Masters, he was on the verge of four in a row. The atmosphere was electric, with a long morning buildup to Tiger’s mid-afternoon tee time. When word spread that he was about to come out of the clubhouse, two lines formed from the door all the way to the ropes just before the practice putting green. 20 Years of Golf: Articles and photo galleries Tiger’s mom, Tida, was standing to one side near the patio. You could not miss her. Tiger would walk out, get a good luck hug from Mom and then make history, right? Tiger popped from the doorway. He walked right by his mother. He saw nothing and no one but the task ahead. And then he won his fourth consecutive major. I started at Golf Channel just as Tiger won his first major title, the 1997 Masters.  It was a great period because not only would we cover Tiger’s rise but the game’s all-time giants were still around, men like Sam Snead, Byron Nelson and Gene Sarazen. I encountered Sarazen in Naples, Fla., in 1999 at a charity event hosted by Ken Venturi. It was Monday after Doral. Jim Nantz was introducing players. Through it all, Sarazen sat silently on the first tee box under an umbrella, dressed to the nines with his plus-fours, sport coat and tie, a straw hat and a cane. He was 97. Eventually, Nantz brought up Ernie Els. Keep in mind that the day before, Els made double bogey on the final hole to kick away the tournament. Always gracious, Els said in his familiar accent, “What a great honor it is to be here in the company of such a great man like Mr. Sarazen.” And then Nantz moved towards Sarazen and said, “Mr. Sarazen, how about that, isn’t that wonderful?” Sarazen, one hand holding the cane, still seated, took the microphone with a shaky hand. He looked up from under his hat toward Els and said, “Ernie Els. Huh, first time in my life I’ve seen a man blow a chip shot for 500,000 dollars.” The place exploded in shocked laughter. Sarazen passed just a couple months later.   Through the years, we brought back more than features and highlights from our travels. There were ribald tales, wrong turns, equipment malfunctions and bizarre interviews – and we spilled it all in the old newsroom after a late “Golf Central,” usually with a stray putter in hand. Scott Van Pelt and I did some of our best work in that setting, with an audience of only three or four, imitating the likes of Richard Pryor, Vin Scully and Keith Jackson. John Feyko, one of our longtime cameramen and our resident Don Rickles, always called Van Pelt and me “13 feet of stupid,” since Scotty’s 6’7” and I’m almost 6’5”. Feyko understood the basic principle of good reporting: Get it right. He did.   Van Pelt came through the door as an entry-level producer and Kelly Tilghman through the library. I jumped from radio in Dallas and we were fortunate to be carried along in those early days by consummate pros like Brian Hammons, Jennifer Mills, Kraig Kann and Mike Ritz. They were the originals and the network grew on the sturdy foundation they built. A few years into my stint, I took one of my sons to the local ice skating rink in Orlando where I ran into our co-founder, Joe Gibbs. Making small talk, I’d mentioned that my wife and I were considering moving out of our apartment and into a house, but that I was unsure of my future at Golf Channel. As a father would to a son, he turned to me and with a knowing smile said, “Buy that house.” I owe Mr. Gibbs, and of course Arnold Palmer, a good deal. We also owe much to the players. At the 2006 Ryder Cup in Ireland, I stood outside the U.S. team room moments after another embarrassing defeat, looking to snag a few post-match interviews. Jim Fuyrk stormed in my direction. This wasn’t the time for a smile and a “Hey, Jim!” They’d just been obliterated. He was hot, that was plain to see. So I did what I’d so often done through the years, just slightly tilted the Golf Channel microphone - with the big G on it – toward him, subtly letting him know that it was time for me to do my job. Furyk stopped in his tracks, turned to me and angrily said, “I’ll do the interview as long as you don’t ask me any stupid, f*****’ questions like they just asked me over there,” pointing toward the green where he’d just been surrounded by press. “Fair enough,” I said. “How do you explain what happened this week?” He replied, “That’s better.” And then he calmly told me that the Americans play tight and there was no good explanation for it. The larger point here,though, is that through the years we’ve only had to tilt our mic flag in the direction of the players for them to stop and give us a few minutes. They’ve been generous with their time from “Golf Talk Live” to “Feherty” to “Playing Lessons with the Pros” to “Live From,” “Golf Central” and “Morning Drive.” More than the announcers, the players are the face of our network, and we’re grateful for their immense talent and their time after they’ve put it on display. Lastly, and you’ll forgive me for getting schmaltzy, we’re grateful to you, our audience. You read about golf, watch golf, play golf, dream golf, love golf and need golf.  Every now and then, in an airport or restaurant or at a tournament, someone will point to me and exclaim, “Hey, Golf Channel guy!” And then we’ll talk golf. That’s what we do. That’s what we love to do.last_img

Letters to the Editor for Saturday, April 25

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first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionOur Mother Earth needs us to listen To reopen America, we need more testingThere are a substantial percentage of people in this country that don’t realize the paramount importance of vast testing regarding the coronavirus.Bringing it to a simple explanation might help them understand the necessity of testing.Assume everyone in America was able to get tested for the virus. At least three things would be determined: Do you have the virus, have you had the virus, or you do not and never have had the virus.For simplification, let’s suppose people never having had the virus are yellow; people who have had, and presumably are no longer contagious, are blue; and people that actively have the virus are red.In all likelihood, it would be safe to say the yellow and blue people can get back to work and normal life. Have the red people go into quarantine until they are no longer contagious. Consequently, the country would be able to get back to normalcy much sooner with a greatly reduced fear of spreading the virus.The purpose of this letter is to inform the people, as those in Minnesota, Michigan and Virginia, who are defying social distancing orders and are protesting state governments to reopen, that it would be considerably more effective to achieve their purpose by protesting the federal government.Perhaps these people, along with many others, in a bipartisan social media protest, should demand Washington vastly expand its testing capabilities. This would certainly help accomplish what all Americans want — expediting the reopening of the United States of America.Louis Restifo Sr.Burnt HillsAthlete deserved recognition in draftI really enjoyed the fantasy boys’ basketball draft article in the April 19 Sunday Gazette. I’m sure it will generate many comments. Mine:What about Rosey Phillips? I’m sure the answer is he has no resume beyond his high school career, which was itself shortened. However, his talent (recognized as a Parade All-American as a sophomore) was beyond question. I’d take him in my starting five.Peter E. ReillyEstero, Fla., formerly of Clifton ParkWe must invest in fighting depressionIn the midst of this horrible COVID-19 virus, I could not help but make a comparison between it and depression. Both silently take a hold of their victims. There is no known cure for either one.People can survive COVID-19 and depression if it is identified and treated. Thousands will die from both if untreated.A face mask may mitigate the numbers who suffer from the virus, but there are no face masks for depression. It strikes slowly and silently and mitigation is complicated.There are no vaccines that will prevent depression.Scientists are working on a vaccine that will prevent COVID-19 and save thousands of lives. Billions and billions of federal dollars have been invested in preventing and treating COVID-19 which has claimed over 30,000 lives.Scientists are studying mental illness and depression but only 35 million federal dollars have been invested. Last year alone, 47,000 people died by suicide, and every year that number increases.With billions of dollars invested in research, we will prevent death by COVID-19. I can only hope that we can say the same about suicide one day.Joann Perillo-LaskySchenectady Thank postal carriers for delivering in crisisI have seen quite a few sincere and well-deserved messages posted for first responders, military service professionals, and health care professionals, and they all have earned our respect and gratitude during these challenging times.However, there is one group that I have not seen mentioned, and that is the postal carriers and clerks.They handle mail and packages daily, as well as dealing with the public some of whom are still not observant of the social distancing and self-care; postal employees are putting themselves at serious risk every time they go to work.How many times has your mail not been delivered since this crisis started? They have not even been late getting our mail delivered, nor have I heard anyone complain about the mail service because of the virus.This is one of those professions that is typically taken for granted, but they are on the front lines every day and continue to do their jobs professionally and competently. If you have to visit the post office for some legitimate reason, or if you happen to see your mail carrier, thank them for the selfless and essential work that they do.Rudy NydeggerBallston SpaPeople not wearing their masks correctlyThe April 16 front page headline read “Cuomo orders use of face covering,” with an accompanying picture of a man wearing a mask.The front page of the local section featured a man serving up two orders of chicken wings, also wearing a mask. Kudos and criticism to The Gazette for these two stories and corresponding pictures.Kudos for the stories; both are very important for everyone to read. One speaks directly to the need to use masks when out in public for our own and others’ protections when social distancing is not possible. The other speaks to the need to support our local small businesses while wearing masks to protect ourselves and others.Criticism, though, for the pictures because they both demonstrate how not to wear a protective mask.The man on the front page might just as well have not worn a mask at all, since the upper edge of the mask is underneath his nose. Every exhaled breath was being expelled into the air around him. The man on the front page of the local section had coverage of his nose and mouth, good for him. However, there appears to be a gap between the mask and his nose and upper cheeks.If the mask is to work properly, it should be pinched to cover nose, mouth and upper cheeks or closed with a small piece of tape if cloth or a bandana.As they say in the subways of London, “Mind the Gap.”Julianne GorsageNiskayunaStand up for heroes of St. Clare’s HospitalIn this time of national crisis, we have realized who the essential workers really are in this society. We applaud the nurses, EMTs, doctors and all the other personnel whose job it is to heal us when we are ill, who are, at this very moment, risking their health and perhaps lives to fight this fight for us. Those people were heroes last month, last year and for decades before that. We rightly honor them now.There are, however, 1,100 of those heroes in our own community who, far from being honored, seem to have been forgotten. These folks worked, some for several decades, for us.The workers at the former St. Clare’s Hospital have lost some or all of their pensions. This is, unfortunately, an old story. Some have died. Some, if they had other savings, have seen those diminished by this crisis. For others, that pension was their future. Gone.If our concern for the heroes working for us now is real, not some passing, feel-good emotion, then we will contact our representatives, the Catholic Diocese of Albany and anyone else who can help these heroes who have sacrificed for us. If we let this injustice stand, we don’t deserve the service these people have given to our community.Frederick ZiemannSaratoga SpringsCongress must give doctors their due Gov. Cuomo, isn’t it time you acknowledged upstate New Yorkers? Every time you’re asked any question about upstate, your answer seems to be “I’ll have to look into that.” I know that you mentioned Buffalo once, and you have acknowledged that Albany is part of New York state. But do you know that places like Schenectady, Utica, Rochester, Elmira, etc. are just a few of the upstate cities that exist? You seem to find us when you want revenue, equipment or votes.It would be nice if you would address our needs and our desires for information about what is happening outside of New York City. Your rant about everyone else’s lack of support is just that, a rant. So please understand that you were supposed to represent everyone in the state, not just New York City.Mary DisabelSchenectadyExamine real causes of unpreparednessI have to reply to untold facts about the virus, and how unprepared hospitals, nursing homes have not been ready for crises like we are facing now.For decades, nurses and some doctors have been begging for more rooms to be set aside for emergencies such as this war — along with supplies, bedding, masks and all the equipment necessary to fight crises. But no, CEOs, presidents, and shareholders ignored these pleas, thinking of the bottom line and getting fat salaries.You wonder why you pay $6,800 for aspirin? They say we have to treat those who cannot pay. When a CEO makes $20 million, they can have the equipment they need.In sanctuary cities, people refusing to get vaccinations, filthy streets, no garbage pickup, etc. that’s the problem, and politicians will not admit it. New York City, Albany, San Francisco  and others are reaping what they sow, and the media is not reporting it. Shame on them, and you.The media just wants to blame President Trump when they should be blaming the real cause. Don’t take my word for it. Just ask nurses and doctors who have been around and get the facts.Al MarvellScotiaBiden should look at causes of problemsIn the April 19 Sunday Gazette, Michael Gerson’s column (“Joe Biden challenged to fill large vacancy in leadership”) has lots of facts correct but misses how to deal with them by 180 degrees, ignoring the fact that most of our security problems weren’t cured by past policies, but created by them.Al Qaeda attacked us because we used our power to prop up a totalitarian government in Saudi Arabia to protect American oil interests.The ayatollahs hate us because we toppled an elected Iranian government and imposed the Shah on them. ISIS’s rise was enabled by the chaos we unleashed with military action in the Middle East.Many refugees fleeing Central America are knocking at our Mexican border. We’ve consistently intervened in Central American countries over many decades to prevent the rise of genuine democracy and prop up ruling oligarchies there, creating conditions causing refugee flight.The only times we have received universal approval and praise for our overseas efforts were when we sent help to deal with earthquakes, typhoons etc., by providing rescue, medical services and material help after such events, not when we used military power and economic attacks.Joe Biden, build more hospital ships, not more carriers.David C. Furman, Jr.NiskayunaHeroes not stopped by sniping and ill willCountry singer Randy Travis made popular a song, “Heroes and Friends” that now applies perfectly to those who have responded to our national pandemic. I speak of the heroes who respond to every 911 call; care for us in the hospital and nursing homes and share our infected space for our welfare.These heroes are indeed our friends. They have put aside their fears and personal safety for the good of humanity.They are undeterred by a dishonest media or our local letter writing hate mongers who hide on the sidelines and snipe at our president; or their fellow heroes who have been so mistreated by our state government; (i.e. the former St. Clare’s employees). They must not go unappreciated.As true “heroes and friends,” they have compassion for all and put their own person, second to that of their fellow man.We stand in awe and total respect.  A heartfelt thank you to all.Jack OsterlitzGlenville Can you hear her? Mother Earth has been speaking 4.5 billion years on this blue planet. Humans have been here for a mere 200,000 years perhaps.For eons, we listened to our Mother; we lived within the harmony of the community of life.But we have turned a deaf ear to her in the last 200 years. We grew arrogant and felt that we could “rape” her of her secrets and treasures. We have taken and taken and not given back.We have poured toxins into her air, water and soil. Now we’re at the tipping point. Mother Earth can absorb no more poison. She cannot breathe. And now we have a disease that prevents our breathing. Is coronavirus her revenge? No, I think not. Our Mother doesn’t deal in vengeful actions; she deals in consequences. In many ways, we humans are reaping what we’ve sown. Unfortunately, the whole of creation, especially the most vulnerable, are being destructively impacted.Can we see what harm our own personal actions are doing? Can we change one of our actions? Stop our waste of resources? Stop littering? Can we recycle? Can we join one of the many positive environmental groups that are making tremendous strides to work for the health and well-being of the web of life? Mother Earth waits – almost holding her breath- waiting for what the human will do in this time of peril and promise.Linda NeilSisters of St. JosephSchenectadyShocked at medical person not in maskAm I alone in being shocked that the picture in the April 20 Gazette of Dr. Kulbida and an unnamed nurse/doctor in the background in the newborn nursery at Bellevue Hospital were not wearing masks or gloves?Color me horrified.Cynthia SwansonNiskayunaGet more informed before commentingI read Winnie Balz’s April 21 letter (“Take precautions to stop spread, not laws”) that she’s having a tough time finding a face mask. She has tried to buy one, make one and doesn’t believe covering your nose and mouth for any length of time is good for you. I certainly believe there are quite a few folks in Washington, D.C., who should be permanently masked and it would be great for me.The reader also stated she deserves some credit for knowing what precautions to take to stay virus-free. Unfortunately, not all residents are as knowledgeable as she, but it is not a law.It is an executive order and store owners should not allow folks in without proper PPE. There are still many people out there that think this virus is a hoax and this isn’t going to magically disappear. Please inform the reader I have plenty of duct tape I will gladly give her for a mask.Mike BriggsScotiaCuomo did right in securing ventilatorsWith all due respect to Mr. Connolly’s criticism of Gov. Cuomo regarding the Ventilator Allocation Guidelines report in his April 13 letter (“What happened to ventilator report?”), in reading part of the report, I came to a different conclusion. Mr. Connolly takes issue with the governor’s extensive efforts to obtain additional ventilators. Mr. Connolly states, “Purchasing additional ventilators is dismissed. The solution is to triage.”Three segments of ventilator availability exist: sufficient ventilators are available, therefore none need to be obtained; it’s impossible to obtain enough ventilators, therefore it’s imperative to establish a “worst-case” protocol, and a middle segment wherein there aren’t enough currently available, but it may be possible to obtain enough ventilators.After watching several governor’s press conferences and reading numerous articles, I believe he’s doing what any clear thinking, competent and empathetic leader would do. That is to try as much as possible to avoid having to invoke the “impossible” segment protocol.That does not invalidate the report at all.I’m sure the patients treated by those “obtained ventilators” and their families and friends would agree.That being said, the exclusions I mention could have been more clearly stated in the letter from the commissioner of health and the Preface, among other places in the report details.Mr. Connolly, do you really believe that if we don’t have enough ventilators, nothing should be done to get more? That seems to be the essence of your criticism and/or you just want to criticize the governor.Albert J. Pirigyi, Sr.Burnt Hillscenter_img More from The Daily Gazette:Foss: Schenectady homeless assistance program Street Soldiers dealing with surge in needEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: No chickens in city without strong regsFoss: Schenectady Clergy Against Hate brings people together I want to thank our local doctors for working on the front lines, bravely fighting the coronavirus epidemic. They are keeping us safe here, caring for local patients and also caring for patients sent to our hospitals from hard hit hot spots like New York City.Other doctors are even voluntarily leaving their families and traveling to places where they are needed most to care for those that are sick and in dire need of help.Not only are they risking their own health, they’re bearing the burden of potentially infecting their families. To say we all owe them a deep debt of gratitude is an understatement.I hope Sens. Schumer and Gillibrand, along with Congress, recognize doctors for their heroic actions throughout this crisis and after as well. Congress took care of first responders after 9/11, and the same recognition for doctors only seems appropriate today. They, too, have rushed “into the fire” to save others.With support from our senators and Congress, and gratitude from us all, doctors will emerge from this crisis prepared to get back to their regular practices and procedures.Let’s hope that day comes sooner rather than later.Adrienne EnglundSchenectadyCARES Act must help nonprofits, tooAs COVID-19 continues to disrupt every facet of society, New York’s nonprofit human services organizations continue to provide necessary services to our most vulnerable citizens.Like many others, we have experienced significant challenges as a result of the virus, compounding the issues we face as a chronically-underfunded industry.Many nonprofits employ more than 500 employees and have not been able to access the Paycheck Protection Program, which contains loan forgiveness provisions necessary to help ensure they can provide services during the crisis and assist with our nation’s recovery efforts.As the Treasury Department implements CARES Act financing to banks and other lenders to make loans to nonprofits and other mid-size business of between 500-10,000 employees, we and a coalition of our peers request that the program: Include a 0.50% interest rate (50 basis points) for 501(c)(3) charitable nonprofits at a 5 year amortization; provide priority to 501(c)(3) charitable nonprofits responding to COVID-19 relief efforts; payments shall not be due until two years after a direct loan is made; employee retention provisions should begin on the date that loan funding is received by the borrower; and, in implementing any workforce restoration and retention provisions, “workforce” should be defined as full-time employees or full-time equivalents.Nonprofit organizations are our country’s only institutions solely focused on making communities stronger. In the toughest times, we do the toughest work. When it’s time to restore and repair our well-being, we’ll be here to help.William GettmanGlenmontThe writer is CEO of Northern Rivers Family of Services.Trump’s full of it? Listen to Biden talk“Um, you know there’s a, uh, during World War II, uh, you know, where Roosevelt came up with a thing, that uh, you know, was totally different, than a, than the, he called it the, you know, the World War II, he had the War Production Board.” — Joe Biden speaking from his bunker in Delaware, CNN Thursday, April 16, 2020.I was convinced that the country had finally hit bottom when Donald Trump became president, but then the Democratic National Committee dug deeper and up came the King of Malarkey.Walter WoukSummitPaper should show proper mask usageIn the April 16 Gazette, your choice of the photo of a person on State Street wearing his mask incorrectly is not a real help for the community.On the front of the local section is another photo – showing the mask worn correctly over the nose. Please help us learn how to adapt to the pandemic and keep ourselves safe.Mary MacDonaldClifton Park Cuomo doesn’t live up to rhetoric, hypeHis critics accuse him of being arrogant, unethical and loose with the truth. They say he is an autocrat who uses his coronavirus pressers to inflate his relevance and political appeal. They say he is the ultimate bully.No, I’m not describing President Trump, but Gov. Andrew Cuomo.Much like his father, Mario Cuomo, who used a well-delivered speech at the 1984 Democratic National Convention to vault himself into the presidential conversation back in the late 1980s, Andy has used this recent crisis to draw praise from his liberal friends in the media and Hollywood. They have even suggested he should be considered a presidential candidate.Please forgive my skepticism, but I have been here during his time as governor of New York. You would be hard pressed to find anyone who personally likes him, let alone anyone outside his loyalists in the Democratic Party who feels he has served us well. The media is looking for any alternative to Trump who they despise. But Andy is not up to the challenge in much the same way his father was long on rhetoric yet lacking in important accomplishments. Please carefully review Andy’s record.Donald FlyntBallston LakeCovid no excuse for poor internet serviceAlthough the coronavirus has disrupted all of the world, I was one of the lucky ones, able to work from home. Unfortunately, all of that came to a screeching halt over a week ago, when Verizon’s DSL internet stopped working.I reported it immediately and was told, “24-48 hours,” and I understood that big companies were also working with a lack of resources.When the service wasn’t working on Monday, they advised me that it would be working by the end of the day, and the next day they told me “by 2:45 p.m.,” then 3:45, then 11 p.m. Every single day, I was given the same commitment, citing “Coronavirus, sorry,” and every day nothing. Spectrum won’t give me service because they won’t come to my house. Now I’m about to lose my job, which I really like and want, because I’m unable to accomplish anything for my boss. Coronavirus isn’t the only reason for lack of good service. Sometimes it’s just an excuse.Diana KlementowskiGreenfield CenterExperiment with opening up D.C. firstHow about resolving the federal/state issue of when and how to re-open the economy by opening Washington, D.C. first?Works for me!Will AubreyMayfieldGovernor doesn’t just represent NYClast_img

School Days

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first_imgGreenport Union Free School DistrictGreenport High School has been recognized by U.S. News and World Report as a Silver Medal school. The news source ranked the high school 215 in New York State and 2604 nationally out of about 26,407 public secondary schools and 10,693 private secondary schools in the United States. This is the sixth time that Greenport High School has been recognized, following three bronze medals and two other silver medals.During a May 22 awards ceremony at St. Anthony’s High School, Greenport High School student Joe McInnis received recognition for his outstanding ability for his presentation on Iridovirus-6 and Colony Collapse Disorder at the Long Island Science Congress Senior Division competition in April.The 10th grader was awarded the Long Island Science Congress Senior Division highest honors along with awards from the Science Teachers Association of New York State Suffolk Division and the Robert Nelson Memorial Award, which was only given to one 10th grader. McInnis was among 1200 students from both Nassau and Suffolk Counties ranging from grades 10 to 12.Riverhead Central School DistrictRiverhead Central School District/Riverhead Middle School eighth-graders impersonated 1920s trendsetters and innovators during a recent lesson on turbulent decades. Showing off their retro style with flapper dresses, pinstripes, cloche hats, and brightly colored scarves, Riverhead Middle School eighth-graders recently culminated a social studies unit on turbulent decades with a 1920s-themed party.The classroom fete capped off a study on the development of mass culture during the Roaring ‘20s. Students researched famous trendsetters and innovators of the period and impersonated those figures at the event.“The party was a lot of fun for the students,” said teacher Kevin Hewkin. “It was a nice way to recap what they learned about 1920s culture and historical figures.”Hampton Bays School DistrictHampton Bays High School senior Jordan Phillips and his teammate, Jack Murray of Eastport-South Manor High School, rose to the challenge and took home a third-place award in the television, video, and digital film category at the 2018 New York State Skills USA Leadership and Skills Conference, held in Syracuse on April 27.The pair competed against 10 other teams to shoot and edit a short film based on a “cliffhanger” theme and were given less than 24 hours to complete the task. They produced the film using skills acquired under teacher Mark Deedy, an instructor with the Bixhorn Technical Center of the Eastern Long Island Academy of Applied Technology in Bellport. Phillips said he was thrilled by the win.When not behind the camera, Phillips is involved in his school’s musical productions. He plans to enlist in the U.S. Navy this fall.In other school district news, Hampton Bays High School hosted the Special Olympics on May 6. Athletes and volunteers wore shirts with logos designed by the school’s seniors as part of an in-school logo contest. Trish Martinez won first place and $100 for her design, and Andrew Zeiser earned second place and $50 for his.Eleanor Whitmore Early Childhood CenterIndependent/Eleanor Whitmore Early Childhood CenterStudents in Erin Albanese’s class had a field trip to East Hampton Library recently.Children in Erin Albanese’s pre-kindergarten class at the Eleanor Whitmore Early Childhood Center took a walking trip to the East Hampton Library recently. In the children’s room, they explored the books and other learning activities, including the listening stations, and enjoyed a story read by the children’s librarian.The fifth parent outreach meeting of the school year was held at the center this week, with presentations in Spanish and in English. Dr. Julio Gonzalez of the State University of New York at Old Westbury and Arlene Pizzo Notel, the center’s program director, discussed “Helping Children Through Life Transitions.”Pre-kindergarteners met some of the community helpers they learned about when officers from the East Hampton Village Police Department visited the center recently.The Wellness Foundation of East Hampton is continuing its “Healthy Food for Life” program with the Pre-K groups at the center. It is a multi-week program on family nutrition.Westhampton Beach School DistrictIndependent/Westhampton Beach School DistrictWesthampton Beach High School senior Caroline Keating earned a rowing scholarship to Bucknell University.Westhampton Beach High School senior Caroline Keating has earned a substantial rowing scholarship to Bucknell University, where she intends to study biology in the fall. She has been rowing independently since the eighth grade, and currently rows with coach Michelle Knox Zaloom of the Peconic Rowing Association. When not rowing, Keating participates in her school’s Key Club, Rotary Interact Club, and pep band. She is also a Girl Scout.Keating wasn’t the only one to celebrate her choice of school recently. As a symbol of their commitment to the pursuit of higher education, the Class of 2018 wore apparel to show off their choice of college on May 1. The class will be heading to a number of premier schools this fall to begin their postsecondary studies. 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Coe says children will need more sport in post-pandemic world

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first_img(Reuters) – Children will need more access to sport in the post-pandemic world and there is a pressing need to press authorities to stop school sports “withering on the vine”, World Athletics president Sebastian Coe said yesterday. The pandemic has wreaked havoc on the sporting calendar across all disciplines and levels from school to professional.Coe told Reuters he was planning to launch a campaign to protect the long-term future of athletics when the global lockdowns and cancellations end.“I want our sport to be a campaigning sport and if we are not about young people and access to the sport we might as well pack up and go home,” the 63-year-old said. “I am not going to be shy or pussy foot around this any longer. This has to be addressed and this has to be the long-term thinking when we come out of this.”A healthier population would be better placed to weather future storms like the coronavirus outbreak, Coe added.“We have got to hit this hard now. We have get into education departments and we can’t let politicians talk a good game about this and not deliver,” Coe said. “The very fact that any child in the UK is 50% less likely to be active between the age of eight and nine, and 12 and 13, is wrong. It just cannot be right. Whichever way you view that, that has to be wrong,” he added.last_img

US Navy ship experiencing flooding after colliding with container ship off coast of Japan

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first_imgNavy Media Content Services(WASHINGTON) — The U.S. Navy destroyer USS Fitzgerald collided with a Philippine container ship off the coast of Japan in the early hours of Saturday morning local time, the Navy’s 7th Fleet said.The Fitzgerald was operating about 56 miles southwest of Yokosuka, Japan, when it hit the container ship at approximately 2:30 a.m. local time.The U.S. ship sustained damage on its starboard side and is experiencing flooding in some spaces, according to the 7th Fleet.There are no reports of fatalities aboard the Fitzgerald, Cmdr. William Clinton, a spokesman for the 7th Fleet, told ABC News. There have been injuries reported on the U.S. ship, and the Navy is checking to see if there are any missing sailors, he said.According to Clinton, the Fitzgerald is now under its own power and headed back to its home port of Yokosuka in Tokyo Bay, traveling at about 3 knots per hour.Navy tug boats are headed to assist the Fitzgerald as it transits to Yokosuka.Two Japanese Coast Guard ships, the Izunami and the Kano, were also headed to the scene of the collision.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.Powered by WPeMatico Relatedlast_img

Fast fact about 99th Grey Cup in Vancouver

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first_imgSunday at B.C. Place Stadium in Vancouver, the B.C. Lions play host to the Winnipeg Jets in the 99th Grey Cup.More than 6 Million football fans from coast to coast are expected to tune in for the Canadian Football League Championship.Some facts about the CFL Finale include:Teams: Winnipeg Blue Bombers vs. B.C. LionsKick off: 3:30 p.m., TSN, RDS, SIRIUS Satellite radio channel 157.Who’s watching:  The Grey Cup is the most-watched annual sports event in Canada. A record 6.4 million viewers tuned in for the 2009 game. Playing surface: Turf fieldHome records: Winnipeg, 5-4; B.C., 6-3Away records: Winnipeg, 5-4; B.C., 5-4 Head-to-head in 2011: Bombers won both meetings, and have won three straight going back to 2010.Head-to-head all time: Advantage to Winnipeg, 83-71-2 (regular season since 1954).Last Grey Cup meeting: Nov. 27, 1988, in Ottawa, Winnipeg won 22-21.Lions' backstory: B.C. has been the hottest team during the last half of the CFL season. The Lions opened at 0-5 before winning 11 of the final 13 games. B.C. is led by CFL MOP Travis Lulay and Outstanding Canadian Paul McCallum.Bombers' backstory: The Bombers are led by quarterback Buck Pierce, who played for B.C. before leaving after too many injuries. Winnipeg also boasts its "Swaggerville" defence.Most Grey Cup wins: 15, Toronto Argonauts.Most losses: 13, Winnipeg Blue Bombers.Most appearances: 23, Winnipeg (24th will come Sunday).Fewest wins: 3, Saskatchewan. Cup wins by West: 37 (since 1940). Cup wins by East: 34: (since 1940).Most points both teams: 83 (Saskatchewan 43, Hamilton 40, 1989).Fewest points both teams: 7 (Toronto 4, Sarnia 3, 1933 and Toronto 4, Winnipeg 3, 1937).Most points winning team: 54 (Queen's University, 1923).Fewest points winning team: 4 (Toronto, 1933 and 1937).Most points losing team: 40 (Hamilton, 1989).Fewest points losing team: 0 (six times, most recently by Winnipeg, 1950).Widest margin of victory: 54 (Queen's University 54, Regina Rugby Club 0).last_img

Galway Athletics Report

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first_imgNational Endurance role for LockettTop coach Matthew Lockett of GCH has been appointed as Athletics Ireland’s National Endurance Coach and will commence his duties in August. He will have responsibility for driving the further development of the middle and long-distance event groups in Ireland at an exciting time for athletics in the country after the medal success at U18 and U20 events worldwide from athletes such as Sarah Healy and others. Craughwell AC athletes also produced some super performances over the weekend.  On the track, Sean Cotter raced to National silver in the U16 Boys 3000m in 9.19. Arlene Earls also won a silver medal in the U19 Girls 400m.  In the field events, Evan Hallinan claimed a silver medal in the u14 boys high jump with a big leap of 1.56. Ellie Cronin came second in the U16 Girls High Jump with a 1.55m clearance, Daniel Callanan-Forde won bronze in the U19 boy’s long jump with a massive 6.13 metre best, and Lorraine Delaney also secured a bronze medal in the U19 girls Long Jump. On Sunday Conor Trehy took U16 Triple Jump bronzeLorraine Delaney CraughwellAC, bronze winner U 19 Long JumpStephen Mannion of South Galway AC was another dual medal winner, as he jumped to a silver medal in the Long Jump at U14 level and took bronze in the U14 Boys 800m, while his brother David Mannion won silver in the U14 Boys 75m Hurdles. Walker Sean Kelleher, also with South Galway, won bronze in the U14 Boys 2000m Walk event.Stephen and David Mannion, South Galway AC, both medal winners at the National championships last weekendThe Juvenile championships continue next weekend, with the final day’s action on next Sunday July 22nd Craughwell AC into EuropeAthletics Ireland has this week confirmed that the Craughwell AC Junior Ladies team has been selected to represent Ireland in the 2019 European U20 Track & Field Championships. The club was selected based on the superb first place club ranking for its U17 to U20 athletes at the recent National Junior Championships in Tullamore. It is a major achievement for the County Galway club to get a squad of athletes to this level and to have the honour of representing Ireland in a major European event.print WhatsApp Facebook Twitter Email National Juvenile Championships Emma Moore GCH U15 Girls 800m championThe National Juvenile Track and Field finals continued in Tullamore Sunday last, and featured two days of U12 to U19 Competition. There were some incredible performances and multiple medals by Galway athletes, with four gold medals coming West via Emma Moore and Thomas McStay of GCH, Sarah Gilhooley of Athenry AC and Darragh Fahy of Loughrea AC.Emma Moore of Galway City Harriers was crowned National U15 Champion for 800m on Saturday last, with a superb record-breaking run of 2.11. This race was the most competitive of the day with the first three girls breaking the previous record (Sarah Hosey in second and Fiona Dillon third also did), but it was the talented Moore who won out, with her second national record this year, and also adding to her National Indoor and Schools titles already this year. Next up, she will represent Ireland at the upcoming Schools International Track and Field event which takes place in Scotland next weekend. World U20 Championships Thomas McStay GCH U19 3000m Gold medallist, with Kellan Kilreehil silver medallist and Hugo Blaire thirdThomas McStay had a terrific run to claim Gold in the U19 Boys 3000m race on Sunday evening in Tullamore. McStay ran a brilliant time of 8.43, and executed his race to perfection, surging away on the last lap to take gold. He also finished fourth in the 800m final the day before.GCH also secured other individual medals, with the consistently strong Aoife Sheehy of GCH winning two medals, a silver firstly in the U19 Girls 100m hurdles a time of 16.26 seconds, and later she took bronze in the U19 Girls 400m. Ava McKeon also won a Silver medal over hurdles for GCH, as she placed second in the U14 Girls 75m hurdles in a time of 11.77 seconds. Conor Hoade claimed bronze for the city club, with third place in the U15 boys 80m hurdles.On Sunday, Robert McDonnell won a silver medal in the U17 Boys 400m for GCH, clocking 51.19 in the final, and will also represent Ireland in the Schools International next weekend in Scotland. Aaron Brennan also GCH won a well-deserved bronze medal in the U18 Boys 3000m, in a great time of 8.55.Sarah Gilhooley of Athenry AC who ran a superb race to take gold in the U18 Girls 2000m Steeplechase.Sarah Gilhooley of Athenry AC ran a superb race over the barriers, to take gold in the U18 Girls 2000m Steeplechase. Liam Shaw, also of Athenry, claimed a National silver medal in the U14 Boys Shot Putt, throwing 14m 15 cm.Darragh Fahy of Loughrea AC showed top class sprint speed winning in the U12 Boys 60m event in a swift 8.26 to take Galway’s fourth gold medal of the weekendEvan Hallinan Craughwell Silver medal in the U14 boys high jump Jack Dempsey of Galway City Harriers had the honour of representing his country in Finland last weekend, as he raced on the Irish 4x100m Relay team at the U20 World Championships, Dempsey competed in the heats of the 4x100m relay along with team mates Aaron Sexton, David McDonald and Conor Morey where they finished third. The squad just missed out on automatic qualification for the final as a result, with only two places up for grabs.last_img

Canadian teen remanded for trafficking heroin

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first_imgA Canadian teen was on Wednesday remanded to prison by Chief Magistrate Ann McLennan after she admitted to trafficking in narcotics.It is alleged that on October 5, 2017, at the Cheddi Jagan International Airport (CJIA), Yuonika Bovell was allegedly in possession of 1.662 kilograms of heroin for the purpose of trafficking.Bovell appeared in the company of legal counsel, who sought to secure bail for the accused pending the outcome of trial.According to the lawyer, the 19-year-old is a Canadian citizen, who has been residing in Guyana for the past nine months with her reputed husband and parents in East La Penitence, Georgetown.The court heard that despite being a Canadian citizen, the teen spent most of the last three years in Guyana working as a cashier in her mother’s grocery store after graduating high school.Bovell voiced through her lawyer that she is oblivious of the charge and willing to lodge her passport or report to CANU on a weekly basis if necessary, during trial.Special reasons advanced on the basis that the accused suffers from chronic asthma and trauma following the recent the loss of a baby was rejected by the Magistrate McLennan and she was committed to prison.CANU Prosecutor Konyo Sandiford led the prosecution’s case.Bovell will return to court on October 24.last_img

Marshfield girls basketball rallies past Superior

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first_imgBy Paul LeckerSports ReporterMARSHFIELD — Ema Fehrenbach and Ellie Fehrenbach made their season-debuts Saturday and made a statement, leading the Marshfield girls basketball team to a 54-44 nonconference win over Superior at The Boson Company Fieldhouse at Marshfield High School.Ema Fehrenbach, a sophomore, scored a career-high 20 points, and Ellie Fehrenbach, a senior, had nine points and nine rebounds for the Tigers (6-1).Ellie Kummer added 14 points for Marshfield.The Tigers trailed 24-21 at halftime before a 17-9 run in the third quarter pushed them ahead by five. Marshfield then closed out the win against the team that knocked it out of the WIAA Division 1 playoffs a year ago.Alyssa Correll led Superior (3-3) with 17 points.Marshfield plays a nonconference game at Bay Port (5-1) on Tuesday.(Hub City Times Sports Reporter Paul Lecker is also the publisher of MarshfieldAreaSports.com.)Tigers 54, Spartans 44Superior 14 10 9 11 – 44Marshfield 9 12 17 16 – 54SUPERIOR (44): Mackenzie Kmecik 5, Malley O’Brien 7, Ellie Leadstrom 8, Alyssa Correll 17, MaryLynne Leadstrom 6. Record: 3-3.MARSHFIELD (54): Makayla Scheuer 2, Caitlin Michaelis 4, Ellie Kummer 14, Ema Fehrenbach 20, Ellie Fehrenbach 9, Hannah Meverden 6. Record: 6-1.last_img

Team South Africa gets rhino mascot

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first_imgThe cheerful rhino Chukuru will spearheadTeam SA’s bid for Olympic glory.(Image: Road to London 2012) The South African public voted Chukuruas their favourite in the mascot race.(Image: Sascoc)MEDIA CONTACTS • Mark KeohaneSascoc spokesperson+27 11 483 3788RELATED ARTICLES• Olympic community gathers in SA• Supporting SA’s sports stars• SA producer gets Olympics for Korea• Laureus honour for Blade Runner• Playing the dreamMediaClubSouthAfrica.com reporterTeam South Africa’s mascot for the 2012 London Olympic Games is Chukuru, a rhino.The animal was introduced to the nation at a function in Johannesburg, during which Team SA’s official kit was shown off on the catwalk by some of the country’s Olympic and Paralympic hopefuls, including swimmers Cameron van der Burgh and Natalie du Toit, javelin champion Zanele Situ, and long jumper Khotso Mokoena.The South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (Sascoc) announced that the gear would be made by Erke, one of China’s leading sportswear manufacturers.According to Sascoc CEO Tubby Reddy, the organisation approached local manufacturers first but were unable to come to an arrangement with them.The Erke deal is reported to be worth US$4-million (R30-million), and includes tracksuits, golf shirts, t-shirts, sandals, caps, backpacks, towels and more.All items bear the protea, South Africa’s national flower and the main symbol of the Sascoc logo.“Our athletes must feel not only comfortable and at home in their kit but also extremely proud and honoured whether they wear it in or out of competition,” said Reddy.The athletic models were impressed with the quality of the Erke product, saying that it’s light, breathable and comfortable.The rhino Chukuru, with five other finalists, took part in a week-long countrywide voting process to decide the nation’s favourite.It will inspire Team SA in all multi-coded sporting events from the Olympics onwards. These include the 2013 World Games in Columbia, the 2014 Commonwealth Games in Scotland, the 2015 All Africa Games, and the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro.Sascoc says it plans to create a national identity for events such as these, and this strategy includes having the same mascot for international tournaments, to bring the country together behind Team SA.Highlighting the plight of real rhinosThe name chukuru is a Southern African word for rhinoceros, in the Setswana language.The Sascoc mascot features the five colours of the Olympic rings around its horn, but fittingly these are also the colours of the South African flag.The cheerful animal was designed by the Johannesburg-based Mortimer Harvey advertising agency, and saw off competition from over 100 entries to make it to the final six and then claim top spot, winning by a margin of 233 over its closest rival.“We knew, straight away that this was a-once-in-a-lifetime opportunity,” said designer Vanessa de Castro. “It was a chance to create something that would represent our Olympic team and the hopes and pride of the entire country. It doesn’t get better than that.”Codesigner Prudence Tshikalange was elated, saying that the design team was “honoured and humbled”.Mortimer Harvey also hopes that the national sporting mascot will raise awareness about the poaching crisis affecting real-life rhinos.With almost 160 animals already killed for their horns in South Africa alone in the first quarter of 2012, and reports of even rhino exhibits being vandalised for the horns, there is a growing worldwide call for toughter action against and harsher punshment for poachers.last_img