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EarthTalk: Will EVs outnumber gas-powered cars on American roads?

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first_imgCalifornia utility admits it may have ignited fireMandatory evacuations ordered for residents near Getty fireYou Might Also LikeFeaturedNewsBobadilla rejects Santa Monica City Manager positionMatthew Hall7 hours agoColumnsOpinionYour Column HereBring Back Library ServicesGuest Author13 hours agoNewsCouncil picks new City ManagerBrennon Dixson18 hours agoFeaturedNewsProtesting parents and Snapchat remain in disagreement over child protection policiesClara Harter18 hours agoFeaturedNewsDowntown grocery to become mixed use developmenteditor18 hours agoNewsBruised but unbowed, meme stock investors are back for moreAssociated Press18 hours ago October 28, 2019 at 9:48 AM Paul Scott says: Comments are closed. If you want to see electric vehicles take over sooner, stop buying new internal combustion cars. The only new car anyone should buy is an EV. Tell your favorite car dealer that you want an EV that does what you need and that is affordable. Until that vehicle is available, you are willing to wait. “No Plug – No Deal!”If you need a different car, there are bargains out there for used EVs and hybrids. But please do not buy any more new gas-burning cars. We want to kill the internal combustion industry completely so that all of ground transportation eventually is powered by clean, renewable electricity. 1 Comment HomeOpinionColumnsEarthTalk: Will EVs outnumber gas-powered cars on American roads? Oct. 28, 2019 at 6:00 amColumnsEarthEarth TalkEnvironmentFeaturedNewsEarthTalk: Will EVs outnumber gas-powered cars on American roads?Guest Author2 years agoearthtalkevsIt looks like we might have to wait some two decades for electric vehicles (EVs) to displace internal combustion cars as the kings of the American road. (Mike Pexels) EarthTalk®From the Editors of E – The Environmental Magazine Dear EarthTalk: I see more and more EVs out of the road. When will they start to outnumber internal combustion cars on American roads? — Jane L., New Bern, NCElectric vehicles (EVs) have been around about as long as cars themselves. In fact, primitive EVs were the dominant form of automotive transportation at the dawn of the auto age in Europe and the U.S. in the late 19th century. It wasn’t until the 1920s—when the U.S. road system was starting to be built out and cheap oil was available from newly tapped Texas oil fields—that internal combustion cars began to take over as the predominant vehicles across the United States.And we never looked back. Until recently, that is. Nowadays, EVs (Teslas, Leafs, Bolts, etc.) are indeed everywhere. Analysts estimate the EVs will be cheaper to buy than internal combustion cars as soon as 2022. Beyond that, it’s probably only a matter of two decades before EVs represent the majority of cars, light trucks and SUVs plying American roads.In 2018, EVs made up only about six percent of total U.S. new car sales, but that figure represents an astonishing 70 percent growth from the year prior. Moving forward, analysts expect around 13 percent annual compound growth in the EV sector for the foreseeable future. Bloomberg New Energy Finance, a research arm of the New York-based media company, expects sales of passenger EVs to overtake conventional internal combustion-based vehicles by 2038 (with EV sales topping 50 million a year as compared to conventional vehicle sales of 47 million by then). After that, EVs, with their lower ongoing fuel and maintenance costs, will continue taking over more and more of the market every year, calling the very future of the internal combustion engine passenger car into question. As technologies mature (allowing for better battery storage and extended driving range) and manufacturers ramp up production and prices come down accordingly, consumers will begin to look exclusively at EVs when shopping for new cars. Indeed, a recent survey of 2,000 adults living in either California or the Northeast Tristate Area (NY, NJ, CT) by consulting firm West Monroe Partners found that the majority (59 percent) of respondents think their next vehicle will be an electric car. Not surprisingly, the survey found that Gen Zers (those born after 1996) are especially inclined toward EVs. That said, only 16 percent of respondents are driving around in EVs today, and concerns including short battery life and lack of charging stations (limiting the vehicles’ range), as well as high up-front purchase costs, are still holding many of us back from taking the all-electric plunge. But the writing is on the wall for gas guzzling passenger cars as we overcome these short-term hurdles. With about 15 percent of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions emanating from the tailpipes of our internal combustion cars and light trucks, and gasoline becoming more and more expensive, the inevitable switchover to EVs—despite efforts by the Trump administration to reduce national fuel efficiency standards and bolster the ailing oil industry—is going to be a win-win for consumers and the planet. 2038 can’t come too soon!CONTACTS: Bloomberg New Energy Finance, bnef.com; “Who is Leading The Charge on Electric Vehicles?” bit.ly/leading-charge; “Yes, Electric Cars Will Be Cheaper,” bit.ly/ev-cheaper.EarthTalk® is produced by Roddy Scheer & Doug Moss for the 501(c)3 nonprofit EarthTalk. See more at https://emagazine.com. To donate, visit https://earthtalk.org. Send questions to: [email protected] :earthtalkevsshare on Facebookshare on Twittershow 1 commentlast_img

Cardinals’ Southland slump continues at SE Louisiana

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first_imgLamar sports informationHAMMOND, La. – Carson Lance had his longest outing on the mound this season, but the Lamar baseball team was not able to back him Saturday when it fell to Southeastern Louisiana 4-1 and dropped the Southland Conference series at Pat Kenelly Stadium.Lance lasted 7 2/3 innings against the Lions (14-4, 5-0 Southland), his longest outing of the year by two innings. He gave up all four of Southeastern’s runs Saturday on four hits and three walks, but he helped save a Cardinals (10-10, 0-5) bullpen that had to run through four relievers Friday night.SLU’s starter Corey Gaconi hurled nine innings with just one run allowed in the game, which was Cutter McDowell’s leadoff home run to right field. Gaconi worked around six hits and walked none. Brett Brown took over for Lance on the hill with two outs in the seventh. He tossed seven pitches in a walk to Sanders and strikeout of Brennan Breaud.Russell and DeVore led the Cardinals with two hits apiece in LU’s six-hit outing. McDowell and Coker collected the other two. Russell was 2-of-4 and DeVore was 2-of-3. Robin Adames was held off the bags for the first time since the 2016 season. His 27-game reached base streak was snapped.The Cardinals will try to avoid the sweep today at 1 p.m. when the two teams square off again. Jace Campbell (1-1, 3.86 earned run average) will get the ball on the mound for Lamar. It will be his fourth start of the season in as many weekends. Next UpThree of LU’s base hits were in the sixth inning, in which the Cardinals left the bases loaded at that time down 3-1. Grant DeVore led off the inning with a bunt single and took second on Cole Coker’s one-out single to right field. Reid Russell followed Coker with an infield single, but Gaconi survived with a fly out and strikeout.McDowell’s home run was the 12th time that LU has scored in the first inning this season, but only the fourth time it’s lost in those games. He took two balls and a strike before he unloaded on the fourth pitch of the at-bat.Reigning Louisville Slugger National Hitter of the Week Taylor Schwarner gave the Lions the 2-1 advantage in the bottom of the first with a double to left that chased home Carson Crites and Drew Avans. Schwarner added another in the bottom of the third when he lifted a sacrifice fly for Ryan Byers.Byers chased home Scottie Sanders on a double to right field, two batters after Sanders himself doubled.last_img

March 1, 2009 On the Move

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first_imgMarch 1, 2009 On the Move On the Move March 1, 2009 On the Movecenter_img Ralph A. Nardi and Todd N. Rosenberg have been promoted to shareholder of Packman, Neuwahl & Rosenberg. Nardi focuses his practice in the areas of taxation, estate planning, corporate, and probate law. Rosenberg focuses his practice in the areas of estate planning and federal and international taxation. James S. Helf has been made a partner in Ruden McClosky in Ft. Lauderdale and concentrates his practice on commercial litigation with a focus on construction law. Glenn D. Moses has been named a shareholder with Genovese Joblove & Battista. Moses concentrates his practice in the areas of complex commercial bankruptcy, business reorganization, creditors’ rights, and commercial litigation. Kathleen L. Mank has joined The Law Office of Andrew M. Reed in Lakeland as an associate. Her current practice areas include commercial/business litigation and corporate law. Ryan T. Santurri has been named a partner with Allen, Dyer, Doppelt, Milbrath & Gilchrist. His practice focuses primarily on intellectual property litigation and intellectual property transactions. Donny Marin has recently opened The Marin Law Offices in Miami, phone (305) 302-5621. Marin’s practice includes personal injury, foreclosure defense, and criminal defense. Dean Bunch, Andy Bertron, Melissa Allaman, Everett Boyd and Virginia L. Gulde have joined Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough in Tallahassee as the firm opens its first Florida office. Kristopher A. Vanderlaan has joined the office of A.J. Rohe, P.A., in Tavares. Andrew B. Thomson recently joined the Miami office of Tew Cardenas, where he will practice business and land use litigation. Philip J. Bonamo has become a partner with Rice & Rose. His practice focuses criminal and family law. S. Curtis Kiser has joined Brewton Plante in Tallahassee as a partner and will continue his practice in the areas of administrative and environmental law, legislative and governmental affairs, and insurance regulation. Gila Garber has become in-house counsel in the structured settlements department at Peachtree Settlement Funding in Boynton Beach. Joseph Nagy has been named a partner in Fulmer LeRoy Albee Baumann & Glass in Ft. Lauderdale. Nicole “Nikki” Fried has joined the Merino Law Firm as an associate. Fried will head the foreclosure defense litigation department. Paul S. Vicary has opened The Vicary Law Firm with an office in the Bank of America Building at 701 Brickell Avenue, Suite 1550, Miami 33137, (305) 728-5 133, fax (305) 397-1741, e-mail: [email protected] . The firm works in various areas, including commercial litigation/transactional, family law, personal injury, and criminal defense. Susan W. Stacy has opened Susan W. Stacy, P.L., in Lake Mary. She continues to litigate real estate, employment, contract, business law, landlord/tenant and elder law issues and has expanded her practice to include the preparation of wills, POA’s, and other testamentary and estate planning documents. H. Hamilton (“Chip”) Rice, Jr., will serve as contact attorney with Lewis, Longman & Walker and will serve as the Manatee County Port Authority attorney. Phil A. D’Aniello has been elected partner at Fassett, Anthony & Taylor. Joseph P. Jones of Tallahassee, Peter Schoemann of Orlando, and Jeremy Slusher of West Palm Beach have been named partners with Broad and Cassel. Susan Verini has joined Colodny, Fass, Talenfeld, Karlinsky & Abate as an associate in the firm’s regulatory and transactional law division. Luis A. Cabassa has joined the newly formed firm of Wenzel Fenton Cabassa in Tampa. 1110 N. Florida Avenue, Tampa 33602; phone (813) 224-0431; fax (813) 229-8712;. Richard S. Weissman has joined Walters Levine Klingensmith & Thomison, where he will practice in criminal defense, construction litigation, and business law. Fredric C. Jacobs, of counsel, has joined Bach Elder Law in Sarasota, expanding the firm’s legal services to the elderly to include estate and financial planning, income tax representation, real estate transactions, and matters relating to the mishandling of trusts and securities accounts. Daren L. Anderson has joined Volpe, Bajalia, Wickes, Rogerson & Wachs as an associate. He will practice in the firm’s insurance coverage, construction litigation, complex commercial litigation, creditors’ rights, and commercial transportation groups. Kim E. Bouck has joined Rue & Ziffra in Port Orange and will focus on medical malpractice. Stephen J. Bozarth has been elected to serve on the board of directors of Dean Mead for a three-year term. Matthew C. Martin, Cameron W. Wilson, and Matthew B. Feldman have joined the Coral Gables office of Gaebe, Mullen, Antonelli, Esco & DiMatteo as associates.  They will practice in the areas of personal injury litigation, nursing home defense and wrongful death, and first- and third-party property claims. Jonathan Blake Hunter has joined the Complex Civil Enforcement Bureau of the Office of the Florida Attorney General as an assistant attorney general. He will prosecute Medicaid fraud through enforcement of the False Claims Act. Robert L. Kaye, formerly of Robert Kaye and Associates in Ft. Lauderdale, has formed Kaye & Bender, as part of his partnership with Michael S. Bender. The firm concentrates in the representation of community associations. Arthur G. Yeager of Jacksonville has joined Allen, Dyer, Doppelt, Milbrath & Gilchrist, where he handles intellectual property matters. Arthur D. Sims has joined Ruden McClosky as of counsel in Orlando. Kevin Cox has joined Holland & Knight ’s Tallahassee office as an associate in the firm’s litigation section. Jonathan Z. Schiller has been named partner with the firm Brinkley, Morgan, Solomon, Tatum, Stanley & Lunny. Schiller concentrates his practice in the area of family law. Thomas J. Meeks of Carlton Fields has been appointed leader of the business litigation and trade regulation practice group for the firm’s Miami office. Jeffrey Backman has been promoted to partner with Adorno & Yoss in Ft. Lauderdale. Backman’s primary areas of practice include securities and commercial litigation. Steven B. Burres has joined Zumpano Patricios & Winker in Coral Gables as an associate. He will concentrate his practice in the areas of healthcare law, commercial and business litigation, and international law. Janet L. Griffin of Feldman Gale in Miami has become director of the firm’s prosecution practice. Burr & Forman and the Central Florida firm of Graham, Builder, Jones, Pratt & Marks have merged and will practice law as Burr & Forman LLP. The Graham, Builder, Jones, Pratt & Marks firm consists of 18 attorneys practicing banking and finance; bankruptcy; business law; construction; employment; land use; estates and trusts; litigation; and real estate. Juan Carlos (J.C.) Ferrer has joined K&L Gates in Miami as a partner in the firm’s finance practice. Kelly Ann L. May has joined Tucker & Ludin, with offices in Feather Sound and Tampa, as an associate. Her areas of practice will include commercial landlord/tenant evictions, civil litigation, disability insurance claims and litigation, personal injury, and Social Security Disability. Jonathan C. Hollingshead has become chair of Fisher, Rushmer, Werrenrath, Dickson, Talley & Dunlap’s executive committee . Keersten Heskin Martinez, Richard W. Smith, Reinald Werrenrath III, and Jeffrey W. Kirsheman also will serve on the Orlando firm’s executive committee.last_img

HHS seeks comments on risks of H5N1 research

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first_imgOct 18, 2012 (CIDRAP News) – Federal health officials are inviting the public to weigh in on whether research on H5N1 avian influenza viruses, including strains modified in the lab to make them more transmissible, is risky enough to require new safety regulations and precautions.The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) wants to know if people think H5N1 should be designated an HHS special agent, which means that medical labs handling it would have to register with the agency and meet special requirements for physical security and personnel screening and training.The department also has asked for comments on whether special safety and containment measures are needed for research involving H5N1 strains with increased transmissibility in mammals. The request follows the publication earlier this year of two controversial studies describing genetically modified H5 strains that were capable of aerosol transmission in ferrets.HHS published its request for comments yesterday in a 16-page Federal Register notice. The public has 60 days to comment.Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 viruses are already listed as select agents in the US Department of Agriculture's (USDA's) province of the Select Agent Program, which means that labs that handle them must register with the USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) and meet related security and screening requirements. But the viruses are not on HHS's select agent list.Oversight by APHIS "focuses on the threat to animal health and safety," the HHS notice says. "Listing influenza viruses that contain an HA [hemagglutinin] from the goose/Guangdong/1/96 lineage [the first highly pathogenic H5N1 isolate identified] as an HHS select agent will ensure that the focus of regulation will also be on the potential impact of these viruses on human health as well as agriculture."The notice notes that certain other agents, such as Bacillus anthracis, which causes anthrax, are on both the USDA and HHS select agent lists. Adding H5N1 to the HHS list "may help to ensure that HPAI strains that have the greatest potential for major direct effects on human health will be regulated with a focus on protection of human health," it states.The request for comments follows a determination by a federal interagency committee that H5N1 viruses may pose a severe threat to human health and safety, according to the notice. The finding came from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Intragovernmental Select Agents and Toxins Technical Advisory Committee (ISATTAC), which includes members from various HHS and USDA agencies and the departments of Homeland Security and Defense.That committee considered "the data showing transmissibility of genetically modified H5N1 viruses among ferrets," along with the virus's virulence and the low level of immunity in the population.The panel also recognized that H5N1 research could lead to better preparedness for pandemic flu and therefore said the risks inherent in research must be weighed against any negative effects that new restrictions might have on legitimate research, according to the notice.HHS is asking for opinions not only on H5N1 as a possible select agent, but also on whether it should be a "Tier 1" select agent, a new category for agents thought to pose the greatest risk of misuse leading to major harm. Tier 1 agents require additional precautions, such as greater physical security and "personal reliability" screening for staff who work with them.Both the USDA and HHS recently revised their lists of select agents. The USDA kept H5N1 on its list but did not designate the virus as a Tier 1 agent. HHS put several agents in the Tier 1 category, including Ebola and Marburg viruses and the agents that cause smallpox, plague, anthrax, and botulism, among others."The final determination of whether or not to designate this particular lineage of H5N1 HPAI as Tier 1 would be a collaborative process between HHS and USDA," the Federal Register notice says. "HHS and USDA would continue to work closely together whether or not both HHS and USDA designate these viruses as Tier 1 Select Agents."Further questions in the HHS notice include:Should special safety and biocontainment measures be considered when working with diagnostic specimens suspected of containing HPAI H5N1?Should even more stringent precautions be used when working with HPAI H5 strains that have increased transmissibility in mammals?In response to queries from CIDRAP News, comments from groups and researchers likely to be affected by an HHS move to make H5N1 a select agent suggest there's a lot of uncertainty about the implications of the HHS notice.Chris N. Mangal, MPH, director of public health preparedness and response at the Association of Public Health Laboratories, said, "APHL has concerns about HPAI H5 viruses being included on the new tier 1 list of select agents. These viruses are already regulated by the US Department of Agriculture. In the coming weeks, APHL will be gathering more information from member public health laboratories to better address the questions posed in the Oct 17 Federal Register notice."Richard J. Webby, PhD, whose lab at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis studies H5N1 viruses and is registered with the USDA Select Agent Program, commented, "To be honest it's not entirely clear what the impact of such a decision would be on operations here but it's something that we are of course investigating fully now." Webby directs the World Health Organization Collaborating Center for Studies on the Ecology of Influenza in Animals and Birds, which is at St. Jude.John J. Treanor, MD, a veteran flu and flu vaccine researcher at the University of Rochester, commented, "I don't work directly with H5 viruses in the lab, but I am sure that this [issue] will be quite controversial. It is probably a consequence of the earlier issues related to the ferret studies. It's a tough call—increasing restrictions will without any doubt make it more difficult to study H5 viruses and if the new regulations required specialized facilities that are not readily available, could substantially reduce research in this area."On the other hand, H5 viruses are potentially very dangerous. I would see a question—do H5 viruses pose greater danger in the form of natural emergence of H5 as an epidemic in humans, in which case increasing containment requirements is counterproductive, or do H5 viruses pose a danger to humans primarily because of possible accidental release, in which case increased containment is very important."See also: Oct 17 HHS Federal Register noticeOct 10 CIDRAP News story "Changes in select agent rules concern public health labs"Jun 21 CIDRAP News story "Fouchier study reveals changes enabling airborne spread of H5N1 virus"last_img

“Wake up, Neo” — ‘Matrix 4’ explosions, choppers keep San Fransisco residents awake

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first_imgPhoto by Warner Brothers/Getty Images(SAN FRANSISCO) — Over the weekend, residents of downtown San Francisco were rattled, some literally, by explosions and helicopters, all for filming the fourth Matrix film.According to video captured by the Daily Mail, low-flying choppers dodged skyscrapers, with others capturing the pyrotechnics show, which sent massive fireballs into the sky late Friday and Saturday night.The Matrix 4, currently shooting in San Francisco under the code name Project Ice Cream, shot from 6pm to midnight Saturday, and continued 5am to 9am on Sunday.One resident took it in stride, noting, “Coming out of Embarcadero station tonight and was greeted by low flying helicopters from the future.”The film even reportedly features a cameo from the city’s mayor, London Breed, according to the San Francisco Chronicle.The sci-fi movie reunites Keanu Reeves and Carrie Ann Moss as, respectively, Neo and Trinity.  It opens May 21, 2021.Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img

Mission: Accepted — Simon Pegg says ‘Mission: Impossible 7’ will start shooting again in September

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first_imgPhoto by Dave Hogan/Getty Images(LOS ANGELES) — Production on Mission: Impossible 7 was moved from Venice, Italy to Rome to try to avoid the spreading COVID-19 pandemic, before it was shuttered altogether in February. But Tom Cruise has a plan to get production back on track — according to one of his co-stars.Simon Pegg, who plays agent and tech genius Benji Dunn in the franchise, tells Variety the “plan” is to start shooting in September. “That will begin with the outdoor stuff. That feels fairly doable, and obviously there will be precautions put in place.”Pegg joked that the franchise’s trademark fight scenes would now have to be shot “five feet apart,” but on a more serious note, explained, “People that are involved in any close proximity stuff, it will have to be determined that they’re safe to do that. I don’t know what the testing situation is, how that works, or whether they’ll be able to be tested regularly.”Pegg’s comments come just as Hollywood has submitted its guidelines for getting back to work post-COVID-19, including safety protocols regarding cleaning, social distancing, and virus testing for crew members.By Stephen IervolinoCopyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img

Former Aliquippa, Pitt star Revis brings skills to playoffs in first season with Pats

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first_imgIn this Nov. 23, 2014 file photo, New England Patriots cornerback Darrelle Revis (24) defends against Detroit Lions wide receiver Golden Tate, right, in the second half of an NFL football game in Foxborough, Mass. Revis’ skills will be on display Saturday, Jan. 10, 2015, when the Patriots host the Baltimore Ravens in a divisional playoff game. (AP Photo/Stephan Savoia, File).FOXBOROUGH, Mass. (AP) — Darrelle Revis looked straight ahead and spotted the reporter standing behind his right shoulder.“I can see him right now without looking at him,” New England’s star cornerback said, smiling at writers and cameras at his locker. “It’s a God-given talent.”Baltimore wide receiver Steve Smith will try to evade that amazing vision — forward, backward or sideways — when the Ravens visit the Patriots in a divisional playoff game Saturday.But if Revis sees receivers, he’s among the best at keeping them from catching passes.“He’s a great corner,” Smith said. “I don’t think you get a one-year deal for, I think, $10 million for being a slouch.”Darrelle Revis at OTAs with the New England Patriots. (AP Photo/File)Revis actually is making $12 million this season, a wise investment after he was released by Tampa Bay in March. He’s due another $20 million next season, an amount the Patriots almost certainly won’t pay, paving the way for possible free agency.But Revis is setting his sights on the Ravens, hoping to reach his third AFC championship game after making back-to-back appearances with the New York Jets in the 2009 and 2010 seasons.Top-seeded New England (12-4) had a first-round bye while sixth-seeded Baltimore (11-6) beat Pittsburgh 30-17 in a wild-card game last Saturday.Revis has made a career of shutting down top receivers by devoting himself to perfecting his technique, studying film, learning from experience and using trickery.“It’s a chess game out there,” said Revis, a Pro Bowler in six of his eight seasons. “You’ve got to bait the receiver. Sometimes you’ve got to bait the quarterback.”Make them think you’re doing one thing, then do something else.Most importantly, Revis has exceptional ability to blanket receivers, seeming to know the route and mirroring it.“I think that has something to do with him being a really good basketball player in high school,” said Brandon Browner, another outstanding cornerback in his first season with the Patriots. “What we do at cornerback is the same thing a point guard’s doing. He shadows them step by step.”So closely, in fact, that some players are reluctant to throw to the receiver Revis is guarding.Not Joe Flacco.The playoff-tested quarterback — 13 touchdown passes and no interceptions in the Ravens’ current five-game playoff winning streak — doesn’t plan to ignore whomever Revis covers.“You allow them to dictate something by who they match him on,” Flacco said. “When we’ve played against some guys and … tried to avoid him or done things game plan-wise to get matchups in other places, it usually just takes your attention away from what you should be doing.”Besides, the Ravens are the best at picking up big chunks of yardage through the air even when a receiver doesn’t make a catch.They led the NFL by drawing 14 defensive pass interference penalties that were enforced this season with six of those drives ending in touchdowns and four in field goals, according to STATS. Torrey Smith led the league with 10 of those calls.“We’ve got techniques that we’ve been working on” to avoid those, said Revis, who hasn’t been penalized for pass interference this season. “We recognize these things and we see them on film.”A completion and pass interference require the receiver to do the same thing: Get in position to make the catch.“You can’t really go in there and say, ‘Hey, we’re going to try to get the pass interference call,'” Flacco said. “Those usually happen by our receivers going out there and playing well and getting themselves in positions to make big plays.”Revis probably will be matched up against Steve Smith, a 14-year veteran.“Does he age?” an amused Revis said. “His age is what it is on paper, but he’s still electrifying.”“Is Revis still Revis?” Steve Smith said to laughter. “I think his ID and his Social Security number would say he’s still Revis.”He led the Ravens with 79 catches and 1,065 yards receiving then added five for 101 yards in the wild-card win over the Steelers.Revis leads the NFL with 123 passes defensed since his rookie year with the Jets in 2007 and led the Patriots with 14 this season.He’s looking to add to that on Saturday.“You have to stay focused. You have to continue to stay patient,” Revis said. “I just work on technique and that’s what’s been keeping me around.”___AP Sports Writer David Ginsburg contributed to this story.___Online: AP NFL website: www.pro32.ap.org and www.twitter.com/AP_NFLCopyright 2015 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img

U14 Selects enjoy taste of Kootenay South Gold

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first_imgBy The Nelson Daily SportsThe roundball season is in full swing and so is the Nelson U14 Selects.The Reps blasted Kootenay South 6-0 en route to the gold medal in the U14 Boys Division at the KSYSA 16th Annual Boys Tournament Sunday at Mozzochi Park in Fruitvale.Micah May scored three times and James Miller added a pair to lead the Reps to the convincing victory.Dunavan Morris-Jansen scored the final tally for Nelson.“In the close games we maintained most of the possession but we just couldn't finish and even when we were down our boys just kept at it,” said Nelson coach Dan Szabo.“Their perseverance paid off, they didn't quit. Once they found the net you could just see the confidence build.”The Selects opened the tournament by rallying back to edge Kootenay South 3-2. Trailing 1-0, Spencer Szabo tied the game on a penalty kick. Kootenay South restored the lead before May pulled the team even again. Nicholas Wethal notched the game winner with just minutes to play.In the afternoon game, the Reps blasted Creston 9-0. James Miller scored three times for Nelson with the remaining goals going to May, Szabo, Keaton Roch and Sam Woodward.Sunday, Nelson advanced to the final by edging Kootenay East Rovers of Cranbrook 3-1. Once again the Selects needed to comeback after being down 1-0.But goals from Morris-Jansen and Tucker Anderson, followed up by an insurance marker by Dylan Bennett, allowed the Selects to pull out the victory.“This was a very important weekend for (the players),” Szabo explained. “The boys have grown and are now, truly, a 'team'. I couldn't be happier for them."Despite scoring more than 20 goals, Szabo was impressed by the strong play of the defensive line.“Much of the credit goes to our fullbacks,” he said. “Johnny Johnson, Theo Bakas and Nick Wethal were a force back there and (goalkeeper) Harrison Giles made some terrific saves.“That guy is a walking Tide commercial.”The Reps have a week off before traveling to Coeur d’Alene, Idaho for a rep tournament during the May long weekend.  [email protected]last_img

Mallard’s Team of the Week — LVR Bombers Basketball Alumni

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first_imgGrads from L.V. Rogers Bombers Basketball program returned to the Hangar Boxing Day to compete in the Blair D'Andrea Alumni Basketball Tournament during the Christmas holidays. Grads 1989-2003 swept through the opposition to repeat as champs.The Blair D'Andrea Alumni Scholarship Society was established in 2012 and has been instrumental in supporting local post-secondary student-athletes, Nelson Hoops grassroots minor basketball initiatives, the Kootenay Chill Club Basketball program, the LVR basketball programs, and the West Kootenay Men's Basketball League through scholarships, donations and equipment.Mallard’s Source for sports would like to salute the Bomber Grads with Team of the Week honours.Pictured are the players from yesteryear who competed in the one-day tournament.For more information on how to donate or get involved with initiatives run by the Blair D'Andrea Alumni Scholarship Society please email [email protected]last_img