Tag: 杭州桑拿

Kermit Joseph Guillot

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first_img He is survived by two daughters, Rhonda Geoffroy and husband Gary of Port Neches and Becky Gardner and husband Brent of Placitas, N.M., brother, Roy Guillot and wife Joan of DeRidder, LA., four grandchildren, Crissy Kicak, Daniel Guarnere, Jennifer Bierbaum and Matt LeBlanc and seven great grandchildren.The family would like to thank his caregiver Robyn Rawls, Magnolia Manor and Heart to Heart Hospice for their special care.Friends wishing to make memorial contributions may send them to: Immaculate Conception Catholic Church, 4100 Lincoln Avenue, Groves, TX. 77619. Kermit Joseph Guillot, 90, of Port Arthur passed away Saturday, May 30, 2020 at his daughter’s home in Port Neches.He was born November 6, 1929 in Plaucheville, Louisiana to Simeon Guillot and Cecile Bordelon Guillot.Kermit had lived in Port Arthur since 1953 and was a faithful member of Immaculate Conception Catholic Church and Port Arthur Neighborhood Action Council (P.A.N.A.C.). Next UpHe enjoyed carpentry, fishing, deer hunting and gardening, but most of all he loved his family and took pride in raising his three girls and adored his grandkids.He proudly served in the United States Army as a military tank operator on Border Patrol for East and West Germany Lines during their Post War Reconstruction.He was given an award for traveling over 10,000 miles in a tank during his time of service.center_img Kermit retired from Standard Alloy as a Supervisor of the Welding Department after 37 years of service.A visitation for family and friends will begin at 10:00 a.m., Wednesday, June 3, 2020 at Levingston Funeral Home in Groves with funeral services to follow at 11:00 a.m. with Reverend J. C. Coon officiating.A Military graveside service will be held in Greenlawn Memorial Park.Kermit was preceded in death by his parents, Simeon and Cecile Guillot, wife of 67 years, Rita Shuff Guillot, daughter, Renee Bierbaum, granddaughter, Nicole Crittendon, seven sisters, Addis Mayeaux, Lillie Lachney, Hilda Guillot, Milda Guillot, Una Dufour, Lula Mae Dufour and Erna Thibodeaux and two brothers, Eldon Guillot and Herbert Guillot.last_img

Chimps can vary their smiles like humans

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first_imgShare Email Share on Facebook Share on Twitter A new study has revealed that chimpanzees have the same types of smiles as humans when laughing, which suggests these smile types evolved from positive expressions of ancestral apes.The new findings from the University of Portsmouth suggest that chimpanzees’ communication is more similar to humans than was previously known.The research also found that chimpanzees are able to produce these smile types silently, without being constrained by the accompanying laughing sound.center_img Pinterest LinkedIn Lead researcher, Dr Marina Davila-Ross, is from the University’s Centre for Comparative and Evolutionary Psychology. Dr Davila-Ross and colleagues study the facial expressions of primates to uncover the evolutionary origins of human laughter and smiling.She said: “Humans have the flexibility to show their smile with and without talking or laughing. This ability to flexibly use our facial expressions allows us to communicate in more explicit and versatile ways, but until now we didn’t know chimps could also flexibly produce facial expressions free from their vocalizations.”The researchers filmed 46 chimpanzees at the Chimfunshi Wildlife Orphanage and used ChimpFACS – a facial action coding system designed for chimpanzees – to measure their facial movements.Co-author on the paper, Professor Kim Bard, who designed ChimpFACS, said: “The coding system allows us to examine very subtle facial movements and compare human and chimpanzee facial expressions, based on their shared musculature.”The study investigated specific types of smiles that accompany laugh sounds and found that these smile types have the same evolutionary origin as human smiles when they are laughing. It suggests that these smile types of humans must have evolved from positive expressions of ancestral apes.The study further suggests that flexibility in facial expressions was already present in ancestral apes and emerged long before humans evolved.Dr Davila-Ross said there are still key differences between humans and our ape ancestors.She said: “Chimps only rarely display crow’s feet when laughing, but this trait is often shown by laughing humans. Then, it is called Duchenne laughter, which has a particularly positive impact on human listeners.”last_img

Mike Sorensen: Local college teams have challenging tasks this week

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first_imgSALT LAKE CITY — What some call the most exciting sports day of the year — Selection Sunday — is over and we have three weeks of college basketball to look forward to now that all of the brackets are set.Four of the state’s six Division I basketball teams will be playing this week and perhaps beyond. Here’s a look at their chances this week beginning with the NCAA teams.BYU — After years of feeling they received a lower seed than they deserved, for once the Cougars got a better seed than they were expecting.All the experts had the Cougs as an 11 or 12 seed and barely making this year’s tournament, perhaps playing in one of the dreaded “First Four” games in Dayton early in the week.Instead, BYU received a No. 10 seed, meaning it was rated ahead of at least seven other at-large teams (No. 11's Nebraska, Dayton and Providence and First Four teams Iowa, Tennessee, N.C. State and Xavier).In Oregon, the Cougars will be playing a team they are quite familiar with, having played the Ducks in Eugene in December. Back then, Oregon was undefeated and ranked No. 13 in the country and BYU probably should have won that game before blowing a late lead and losing in overtime.But the Cougars are going into this year’s NCAA tourney with a damper over their heads, having lost arguably their best player, Kyle Collinsworth, to a season-ending knee injury in the finals of the West Coast Conference tournament last week.Not only will they miss not having Collinsworth, but because depth isn’t their strong point, they’ll have to go deeper down the bench with players such as freshman Frank Bartley, Skyler Halford and the always unpredictable Matt Carlino.The Ducks are certainly more talented, and after a poor stretch in the middle of the season when they lost eight of 10, they won eight straight before losing to UCLA in the Pac-12 quarterfinals.It looks like a one-and-done for the Cougars this year.Weber State — The Wildcats from Utah are thrilled to be in their first NCAA tournament in seven years, and coach Randy Rahe says the team won’t have the attitude of “happy to be there.’’But they had to swallow hard when they saw their first-round opponent would be the Wildcats of Arizona.Arizona absolutely throttled Utah in the Pac-12 quarterfinals, winning by 32 points and completely shutting down the Utes’ offense with a suffocating defense. They did the same to Colorado the next night before losing a close game to UCLA in the league finals.If Weber State looks to its history, it can find wins over Michigan State and North Carolina in the 1990s when the Wildcats were No. 14 seeds. But this time they are a No. 16 seed. Never in NCAA history has a 16th seed upset a No. 1 seed, and it won’t happen this year.At least the Weebs can look back and say they were happy to be back in the NCAA tournament for a change.Utah — The Utes had to be feeling like they were good enough to be in this year’s tournament as they watched the bracket being unveiled Sunday afternoon.There was Colorado, a team they beat by 11 at home and lost in overtime on the road, getting a No. 8 seed. There was Arizona State, a team the Utes beat by 23 at home and lost to by four on the road, getting a No. 10 seed. There was Stanford, a team it lost to by one point on the road a little more than a week ago, getting a No. 10 seed. Not to mention UCLA, a team it beat by five at home, getting a No. 4 seed and BYU, a team it beat by 17 at home, getting a No. 10 seed.The problem was, all those victories came at home as the Utes hardly ventured outside the Huntsman Center all year except for league games. The NCAA selection committee looks closely at schedules and road wins and the Utes failed on both counts. NCAA Selection Committee Chairman Ron Wellman said Sunday the reason SMU wasn’t selected for the tournament was its weak non-conference schedule, the same problem Utah had.After five years without a postseason bid, the Utes are happy to be in the NIT, but they have to be disappointed not to get a home game and to go on the road against Saint Mary’s. They might be able to get past the Gaels, but considering their lack of success on the road this year, they aren’t likely to win three straight in order to get a chance to go to New York for the NIT Final Four.Utah Valley — The Wolverines were sorely disappointed to not win the WAC tournament title last week in Las Vegas but are taking the school’s first-ever NIT berth against Cal as a nice consolation prize.To get to New York, the Wolverines will have to win three road games, which will be an overwhelming chore, but just getting to the NIT for a school that is a decade removed from being a junior college is a huge accomplishment.last_img

Auburndale girls win title, Marshfield boys and girls second at Wood County Track Meet

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first_imgAuburndale, Marshfield girls each win five eventsBy Paul LeckerSports ReporterAUBURNDALE — The Auburndale girls won the team title, and both the Marshfield boys and girls finished second at the 2017 Wood County Track Meet on Monday at Auburndale High School.Auburndale won the girls title by a slim margin, outlasting Marshfield 145-144.5. Columbus Catholic was fifth with 49.5 points.Wisconsin Rapids won the boys team title with 249 points, with Marshfield second (182), Columbus Catholic fifth (37), and Auburndale sixth (33.5).The Auburndale girls won five events. Rachel Gronemeyer took first in the 400 meters in 1:03.71, Kali Karl won the 800 (2:13.14), Vanessa Mitchell won the 1,600 (6:02.22), Amanda Momont won the long jump (15-0.5); and the 3,200 relay team of Taylor Stanton, Macie Schmeiser, Mitchell, and Karl finished first in 10:45.37.Kendra Baierl had Columbus Catholic’s lone win as she took first in the triple jump with a leap of 31-10.5. Natalie Pospyhalla was second in the 3,200 in 13:51.67.Marshfield also had five victories: Molly Meyers in the shot put (31-11); Nadia Ougayour in the discus (105-0); Stephanie Rhodes in the high jump (5-0); Meg Bryan in the triple jump (34-3); and the 800 relay team of Alexa Aumann, Gracie Holland, Kaydee Johnson, and Maddie Nikolai (1:51.27).On the boys side, Skyler Theisen won the 110-meter (16.06) and 300-meter hurdles (41.09), and he was part of the 1,600 relay team, along with Brant Bohman, Jackson Ott, and Sam Hinson, that won in 3:38.70 for Marshfield’s top finishes.Josh Guyer had Columbus Catholic’s best finish, taking second in the 3,200 in 11:01.10.Auburndale had third-place finishes from Carvey Empey in the 400 (53.30) and the 3,200 relay team of Darren Kieffer, Paul Peplinski, Matt Leick, and Josh Peplinski (9:51.12).(Hub City Times Sports Reporter Paul Lecker is also the publisher of MarshfieldAreaSports.com.)2017 Wood County Track MeetBoysTeam scores: 1. Wisconsin Rapids 249; 2. Marshfield 182; 3. Nekoosa 64; 4. Wisconsin Rapids Assumption 58; 5. Marshfield Columbus Catholic 37; 6. Auburndale 33.5; 7. Pittsville 20.5.Winners and Marshfield, Auburndale, Marshfield Columbus Catholic finishers100: 1. Austin Glinski (WR) 11.32; 3. Adam Elhendy-Gunnarsson (AMR) 11.80; 4. Quinton Alexander (MAR) 11.92; 5. Blaine Nienast (MAR) 12.01; 8. Nadim Torbey (MCC) 12.43; 9. Kaleb David (AUB) 12.59; 12. Wyatt Bauer (MCC) 13.07; 16. Alex Mertz (AUB) 14.61; 18. Tylar Bauer (AUB) 15.12.200: 1. Glinski (WR) 22.97; 3. Elhendy-Gunnarsson (MAR) 23.68; 5. Caden Pearce (MAR) 24.35; 6. Carver Empey (AUB) 24.41; 7. Nienast (MAR) 24.48; 9. David Nielsen (MCC) 24.94; 10. David (AUB) 25.33; 13. Jake Peplinski (AUB) 26.61; 14. Bauer (MCC) 26.69.400: 1. Glinski (WR) 50.70; 3. Empey (AUB) 53.30; 5. Brant Bohman (MAR) 54.86; 6. Jackson Ott (MAR) 55.43; 7. Sam Hinson (MAR) 56.66; 9. Paul Peplinski (AUB) 57.54; 11. Alex Giles (MCC) 1:02.52; 14. Josh Peplinski (AUB) 1:04.88; 15. Coleton Grambsch (MCC) 1:10.62; 16. Isaac Duerr (MCC) 1:12.64.800: 1. Matthew Aaseng (WR) 2:04.87; 2. Addison Hill (MAR) 2:07.31; 3. Peyton Nystrom (MCC) 2:09.70; 5. Tim Gruenloh (MCC) 2:13.91; 6. Jon Viegut (MCC) 2:15.00; 11. Gage Stoflet (AUB) 2:22.38; 13. Darren Kieffer (AUB) 2:25.36; 14. Paul Kollross 9AUB) 2:28.61.1,600: 1. Miguel Mathias (NEK) 4:33.76; 3. Paul Fischer (MAR) 4:53.65; 5. Jordan Dzikowich (MAR) 4:58.52; 6. Jared Oemig (MAR) 4:58.66; 8. Josh Guyer (MCC) 5:01.76; 12. Benny Frericks (MCC) 5:11.10; 14. Kollross (AUB) 5:32.64; 15. Scott Seinert (MCC) 5:38.11; 18. Kieffer (AUB) 5:46.33; 19. Ian Lang (AUB) 6:18.78.3,200: 1. Mathias (NEK) 9:54.05; 2. Guyer (MCC) 11:01.10; 4. Jacob Dick (MAR) 11:18.05; 5. Joseph McKee (MAR) 11:18.88; 8. Frericks (MCC) 11:57.10; 9. Matt Leick (AUB) 12:17.82; 10. Steinert (MCC) 12:48.48.110 hurdles: 1. Skyler Theisen (MAR) 16.06; 3. Eric Kubash (MAR) 16.68; 6. Kyle Tremelling (MAR) 19.42.300 hurdles: 1. Theisen (MAR) 41.09; 5. Kubash (MAR) 44.66; 6. Giles (MCC) 48.17; 9. Tremelling (MAR) 51.24.400 relay: 1. Nekoosa (Andrew Fuhrmann, Trenton Smith, Trevor Smith, Marky Wiesen) 44.48; 3. Marshfield (Alexander, Austin Mintke, Pearce, Elhendy-Gunnarsson) 45.90.800 relay: 1. Nekoosa (Fuhrmann, Trenton Smith, Trevor Smith, Wiesen) 1:32.86; 3. Marshfield (Kubash, Mientke, Pearce, Micah Smithy-Jensen) 1:39.14; 4. Auburndale (David, Stoflet, Brent Lau, Ja. Peplinski) 1:42.97.1,600 relay: 1. Marshfield (Theisen, Bohman, Ott, Hinson) 3:38.70; 3. Marshfield Columbus Catholic (Nystrom, Jon Veigut, Gruenloh, Giles) 3:53.00.3,200 relay: 1. Wisconsin Rapids (Bryson Einerson, Colin Lindvig, Isaac Gilbert, Nickolas Willard) 9:17.30; 2. Marshfield (Joseph McKee, Sam Huettl, Nathaniel Phillips, Alex Wehrman) 9:26.00; 3. Auburndale (Kieffer, P. Peplinski, Matt Leick, Jo. Peplinski) 9:51.12.Shot put: 1. Ben Veverka (WRA) 46-7.5; 2. Alexander (MAR) 46-3.5; 6. Alex Steines (MAR) 36-2.25; 7. Brody Anderson (MAR) 34-8; 8. Wyatt Fowler (AUB) 34-3; 12. Ryan Patyk (AUB) 29-11.5; 15. Koltin Pask (AUB) 28-5; 16. Isaac Duerr (MCC) 26-7.5; 17. Grambsch (MCC) 26-7.Discus: 1. Ververka (WR) 150-6; 3. Alexander (MAR) 123-3; 8. Stoflet (AUB) 96-7; 9. Anderson (MAR) 96-0; 13. Fowler (AUB) 91-3; 14. Steines (MAR) 89-7; 15. Pask (AUB) 75-5; 16. Grambsch (MCC) 65-11; 17. Duerr (MCC) 64-8.High jump: 1. Robert Stevens (WR) 5-10; 4. Collin Fravert (MAR) 5-4; 5. Nystrom (MCC) 5-2.Pole vault: 1. Kaden Kreutzer (WR) 12-6; 2. Dawson Tysver (MAR) 11-6; 3. Adam Maki (MAR) 11-0; 4. Dustin Altman (MAR) 10-0; 6. Kollross (AUB) 9-0; 8. Lau (AUB) 9-0.Long jump: 1. Isaiah Westfall (WR) 21-5.25; 2. Elhendy-Gunnarsson (MAR) 19-10.5; 5. Empey (AUB) 18-5; 8. Pearce (MAR) 17-8.5; 9. Neinast (MAR) 16-8.75; 12. Kieffer (AUB) 14-9; 16. Lang (AUB) 12-4.Triple jump: 1. Westfall (WR) 45-6.75; 5. Empey (AUB) 37-6; 9. Tremelling (MAR) 34-9.5; 10. Fravert (MAR) 34-0.5; 11. Giles (MCC) 33-8.25.—GirlsTeam scores: 1. Auburndale 145; 2. Marshfield 144.5; 3. Wisconsin Rapids 114; 4. Nekoosa 82; 5. Marshfield Columbus Catholic 49.5; 6. Pittsville 46.5; 7. Wisconsin Rapids Assumption 38.5; 8, Port Edwards 15.Winners and Marshfield, Auburndale, Marshfield Columbus Catholic finishers100: 1. Emma Seipel (NEK) 13.66; 3. Amanda Momont (AUB) 13.92; 4. Rachel Gronemeyer (AUB) 14.07; 7. Carly Brickley (MAR) 14.19; 10. Brooke McGrath (MAR) 14.52; 11. Sophia Hackel (MCC) 14.62; 15. Carleanna Franck (AUB) 16.29; 16. Kayla Krause (MAR) 16.52.200: 1. Katelyn Moyer (WR) 27.84; 2. Isabelle Hilber (AUB) 28.25; 3. Alexa Aumann (MAR) 28.87; 10. Hackel (MCC) 30.31; 11. Celine Scholin (MCC) 30.39; 13. Alexandra Wolf (AUB) 31.35; 16. Anna Beihoffer (AUB) 32.69; 19. Krause (MAR) 34.69; 20. Mackenzie Frankland (MAR) 35.43.400: 1. Gronemeyer (AUB) 1:03.71; 2. Isabella Jewell (AUB) 1:04.85; 5. Macie Schmeiser (AUB) 1:06.42; 7. Scholin (MCC) 1:10.12; 9. Jocie Anderson (MAR) 1:15.36; 12. Makayla Carle (MAR) 1:21.62; 13. Ryleigh McGiveron (MCC) 1:37.13.800: 1. Kali Karl (AUB) 2:31.14; 2. Taylor Stanton (AUB) 2:37.88; 3. Schmeiser (AUB) 2:43.75; 5. Hannah Grubofski (MCC) 2:50.09; 6. Morgan Albrecht (MCC) 2:56.27; 8. Halle Hollatz (MAR) 3:04.92; 9. Lizzy Kloehn (MAR) 3:07.44; 14. Taylor Geurink (MAR) 3:26.66.1,600: 1. Vanessa Mitchell (AUB) 6:02.22; 3. Sophia Schrodi (MAR) 6:07.33; 5. Lilly O’Brien (MAR) 6:19.10; 8. Anna Kollross (AUB) 6:34.99; 12. Hannah Schulte (AUB) 7:22.93; 13. Greta Schiferl (MCC) 8:29.49.3,200: 1. Willow Sering (WR) 12:42.79; 2. Natalie Pospyhalla (MCC) 13:51.67; 3. Melanie Lang (MCC) 14:28.56; 4. A. Kollross (AUB) 14:33.01; 5. Emmie Richardson (AUB) 15:23.36; 6. Vicky Ertl (AUB) 15:31.65; 7. Emily Mueller (MAR) 16:39.80; 8. Madi Hall (MAR) 17:49.05.100 hurdles: 1. Sering (WR) 17.74; 2. Maddie Nikolai (MAR) 18.56; 5. Isabelle Denowski (MAR) 19.28; 8. Brionna Zygarlicke (MCC) 20.32; 9. Julianna Kollross (AUB) 20.38.300 hurdles: 1. Chrysten Linzmeier (WRA) 53.83; 2. Sadie DeGrand (MAR) 55.66; 5. Abby Voss (MAR) 57.57; 9. J. Kollross (AUB) 58.63; 11. Shantel Nienast (MAR) 59.50; 12. Zygarlicke (MCC) 1:00.60.400 relay: 1. Wisconsin Rapids (Elizabeth Keena, Kristin Hansen, Grace Hartman, Katelyn Moyer) 50.74; 3. Marshfield A (Mariah Goeppinger, McGrath, Stephanie Rhodes, Kati Sadowska) 55.09; 4. Marshfield B (Marlee Freeck, Brickley, Samantha Hoch, Lindsey Steffen) 57.39.800 relay: 1. Marshfield A (Aumann, Gracie Holland, Kaydee Johnson, Nikolai) 1:51.27; 5. Marshfield B (Freeck, Brickley, Hoch, Steffen) 2:03.18; 7. Auburndale (Anna Beihoffer, Natasha Neve, Skyler Wolff, Alexandra Wolf) 2:05.88.3,200 relay: 1. Auburndale (Stanton, Schmeiser, Mitchell, Karl) 10:45.37; 3. Marshfield Columbus Catholic (Albrecht, Grubofski, Pospyhalla, Lang) 11:22.06; 4. Marshfield A (Abby Voss, DeGrand, Hollatz, Lottie Schrodi) 12:31.9; 5. Marshfield B (Taylor Geurink, Marah Jicinsky, Kloehn, Mueller) 13:58.01.Shot put: 1. Molly Meyers (MAR) 31-11; 2. Katie Osinski (MAR) 30-4; 5. Jessica Jakopin (MCC) 29-8; 7. Sam Jensen (AUB) 28-5.75; 9. Makayla Weigel (MAR) 27-3.5; 13. Katie Peplinski (AUB) 24-6; 16. Beihoffer (AUB) 22-4.25.Discus: 1. Nadia Ougayour (MAR) 105-0; 4. Jamila Ougayour (MAR) 87-11; 6. Jensen (AUB) 84-6; 7. Jessica Jakopin (MCC) 84-6; 13. Kayla Whitehead (AUB) 62-4; 14. Shelby Lang (MAR) 62-0; 18. Wolff (AUB) 53-6.High jump: 1. Rhodes (MAR) 5-0; 3. Kendra Baierl (MCC) 4-8; 4. Nienast (MAR) 4-8; 6. Momont (AUB) 5-6; 7. Hilber (AUB) 4-4; 10. Riley Slade (MAR) 4-2.Pole vault: 1. Ana Klein (PIT) 9-0; 2. Holland (MAR) 9-0; 3. J. Kollross (AUB) 8-6; 4. Jewell (AUB) 7-6; 6. Sadowska (MAR) 7-0; 7. Anderson (MAR) 6-0; 8. Ertl (AUB) 6-0.Long jump: 1. Momont (AUB) 15-0.5; 6. Johnson (MAR) 13-11; 7. Hilber (AUB) and Hoch (MAR) 13-10; 9. Steffen (MAR) 13-9.5; 10. Baierl (MCC) 13-9; 15. Wolf (AUB) 13-1; 16. Scholin (MCC) 13-0.25; 17. Hackel (MCC) 12-11.5.Triple jump: 1. Meg Bryan (MAR) 34-3; 2. Baierl (MCC) 31-10.5; 3. Jewell (AUB) 31-6.75; 5. Stanton (AUB) 28-9.75; 7. Taylor Ferch (MAR) 27-1; 8. Makayla Carle (MAR) 26-5.last_img

VC Web 2.0 List: Big Money For New Media and Marketing Companies

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first_imgTop Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting SiliconBeat has published a list of all “Web 2.0 companies” that received venture backing over 2005and so far in 2006. The list was created by PricewaterhouseCoopers and the NationalVenture Capital Association. In the comments to SiliconBeat’s post, two prominent 2.0 VCshave dissed the list. Peter Rip thinks it’s “ridiculous”, saying that “Web 2.0 is aninvestment fad, for sure, but this classification is pointless in its generality.” Brad Feld agrees with Peter, noting that the classification is awful. Be that as it may, the list is a useful resource – at least in terms of quantifyingcertain things. The most interesting analysis I can think to do on it right now is seeing whichcompanies have received the most funding. The resulting tables are below.In 2005 Vonage got a staggering $200 Million inVC backing, while a company called Datran Media Corporation (according to its website “a leading performance-based marketingcompany”) garnered $60M.Meanwhile in 2006 Sling Media (a TiVo competitor in the digital television space) hasraked in $46M so far this year, with advertising software company Claria Corp (formerlyGator Corporation) pulling in $40M. ePrize, which bills itself as “an interactivepromotion agency” is third on the 2006 list. RazorGator is another which has receivedover $20M in 2006 – they’re an eventticket sales company.While I haven’t digged deep into the spreadsheet that was kindly offered up bySiliconBeat, it does seem noteworthy that the companies receiving the most funding aremedia, advertising/marketing and e-commerce businesses. Indeed recently I notedhere on Read/WriteWeb that online advertising is hot in 2006 – andthat seems to be borne out in the VC investment list.When it comes down to it, there aren’t many companies in the tables below that I’dhave immediately classified as “web 2.0”. Let’s see… definitely Riya, Zimbra andSharpcast – maybe a few others. But it seems the startups attracting VC dosh are in thenew media, marketing and business sectors. Is that really a surprise? I’d suggest alittle bit, but then a lot of so-called web 2.0 companies don’t require a lot of cash todo business (one of the hallmarks of this current era). On the other hand, it perhaps does suggest that the real money in this era willbe made not on the trendy web 2.0 companies – but on the new media and marketingbusinesses. Thoughts anyone?2006 – 1st Quarter – sorted by Amount2005- sorted by Amount Tags:#business#web Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic... A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai...center_img Related Posts 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market richard macmanuslast_img

Gotuit SceneMaker and The Online Video Holy Grail

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first_imgWhy Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic... A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai... richard macmanus Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Related Posts center_img Last week I was briefedabout a new product just released by Gotuit, calledSceneMaker. It enablespeople to cut up and tag videos from platforms like YouTube or Metacafe. SceneMakeressentially allows users to embed e.g. a YouTube video in a Gotuit page, then addmetadata around it. I was impressed with theusablity of SceneMaker, but one question I had was how the likes of YouTube and Metacafewill react to having their user-generated content manipulated on another site – whichthey may view as a competitor? The Gotuit folks didn’t seem concerned about this, sayingthat the hosting of the videos always remains with the likes of YouTube – Gotuit simplyprovides a platform to add metadata to those videos. Techcrunch has more details about SceneMaker’s features.Essentially this is another bit of progress in what I recently described as the holygrail of online video, searching within videos. In that post I describedanother web app, called Coull.tv – which allows users tosearch for specific moments within videos, as well as click on and interact with “movingobjects”. It was noted in the comments to that post, by regular R/WW commenter “old school developer”,that Coull.tv is currently Microsoft Windows technology only and the ability tomanipulate or interact with objects inside video is an MPEG-4 feature.osd was also kind enough to point me to other instances of searching within video.VentureBeat recently ran a story about Pluggd, which raised $1.65M onthe back of claims that it “perfects” audio and video search. Other videosearch companies mentioned in that article were Pixsy,Podzinger and CastTV.Gotuit SceneMaker is not a Windows-only technology and it seems very slick, so thislooks like a promising product. However it remains to be seen how many users from YouTubeand Metacafe they can attract, because it seems to me they’d need to (ahem) cut intothose existing audiences to gain traction. Also getting a core community of active usersto do the majority of the video cutting and editing will be – as always – the keychallenge. 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Tags:#Video Services#web last_img

10 months agoMan Utd boss Solskjaer: What I can teach Rashford

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first_imgMan Utd boss Solskjaer: What I can teach Rashfordby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester United boss Ole Gunnar Solskjaer has no doubts about the potential of Marcus Rashford.Solskjaer wants to teach the England striker how to become a fox in the box after he struggled for goals under predecessor Jose Mourinho. He said: “I think Marcus has got his own motivation to become the best player he can be.“He has got far more than I did in terms of his physical attributes, his pace, his strength and striking the ball from outside the box. But maybe I can give him a little bit of the nous I had inside the box. I'm talking about the little moves you make to get free, that little bit of calmness in front of goal."Marcus is only 21. He's still learning. The most important thing I can see is to just settle him down in front of goal.“I've seen him rush a few finishes. He thinks 'I've got to get a shot off early' when sometimes you just need to pass it past the keeper. I always say that the goal never moves. So I am really looking forward to working with him." About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img

13 days agoWilfried Zaha rethinks quitting Crystal Palace

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first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Wilfried Zaha rethinks quitting Crystal Palaceby Paul Vegas13 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveWilfried Zaha has gone cold on quitting Crystal Palace.Zaha admits his “head was all over the place" after proposed summer moves to Arsenal and Everton collapsed over his club's £80m asking price.He said: “I'm seeing how it goes. I'm a Crystal Palace player and I'm just trying to perform to the best of my ability for my club.“I'm not thinking about anything else and just taking each day as it comes. The season's gone well so far. We've got a lot more in us.“I'm happy with the squad and everyone's happy with where we are right now. All I can do is perform on the pitch. I'm trying to be a consistent performer on the pitch week in, week out." last_img

Valentines Day special a mix of serious and serious art InFocus

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first_imgAPTN InFocus with Cheryl McKenzie:With so many missing and murdered, Valentine’s Day takes on new meaning.We begin this edition with why organizers of missing and murdered Indigenous women marches are also memorializing missing and murdered men.Then we lighten things up with coverage of a unique art exhibit.Artist, Terrance Houle brings us the National Indian Leg Wrestling League of North America.  A must see!Plus, love advice from a woman who wants to start a show called, As Long As We’re Not Cousins.last_img

Fort St John RCMP investigate early morning robbery of a cyclist

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first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – On the early morning of June 16, Fort St. John RCMP received a report of a robbery that occurred on the north side of 100 Avenue and 102 Street.According to RCMP, at around 3:00 a.m., a mountain bike rider was on their way to work when the cyclist was accosted by four male suspects.Police say the suspects ranged in height from 5’4″ to 5’10” and were all wearing black hoodies with white and blue bandanas covering the bottom of their faces. It is said that one of the suspects punched the victim in the face causing the rider to fall off their bike.  The suspects then took the red mountain bike and left eastbound on 100 Avenue.The Fort St John RCMP Police Dog Services unit attended the scene but was not able to locate the suspects.The RCMP believe this is an isolated incident and are asking anyone who has information about this incident to contact them at 250-787-8100 or CrimeStoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS.last_img