Category: vkmbjaobkwfu

Despite modest gains, Trump basks in recognition for Washington’s response to the opioid crisis

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first_img About the Author Reprints Despite modest gains, Trump basks in recognition for Washington’s response to the opioid crisis @levfacher Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. GET STARTED Unlock this article — plus daily intelligence on Capitol Hill and the life sciences industry — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED Washington Correspondent Lev Facher covers the politics of health and life sciences. Lev Facher STAT+ is STAT's premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. What is it?center_img By Lev Facher Oct. 24, 2018 Reprints Tags Congressgovernment agenciesopioidspolicyWhite House Politics What's included? President Donald Trump stands with business leaders on the stage during an East Room event at the White House. Alex Wong/Getty Images [email protected] Log In | Learn More WASHINGTON — The claps died down for a moment, but quickly came back louder than before: by the end, the assembled lawmakers, Cabinet members, law enforcement officials, and White House staff applauded President Trump and his efforts to address the opioid crisis for nearly 40 seconds.It was a lengthy victory lap for a year of modest progress combating the opioid crisis, culminating in the president signing a sweeping but largely unambitious bill.last_img

Government secrecy over Ruby Princess link to COVID-19 outbreak

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first_imgGovernment secrecy over Ruby Princess link to COVID-19 outbreak Tasmanian LaborGovernmenttrying to sweep Ruby Princess debacle under the carpetTasmaniansdeserve to know who made the final callGovernmentsecrecy is appallingPeter Gutwein is refusing tobe honest with Tasmanians about the clear breakdown in decision making that ledto the COVID-19 outbreak on the North West Coast.Explosive revelationsemerged in Budget Estimates this week that Biosecurity Tasmania staffidentified the risk of passengers from the Ruby Princess entering Tasmania butwere told to allow them in without quarantine.Shadow Minister for PrimaryIndustries, Shane Broad, said this was a devastating mistake and Tasmaniansdeserved to know how the decision was made and who made the final call.“Biosecurity officersidentified the risk of Ruby Princess passengers entering Tasmania withoutquarantine on or around 19 March,” Dr Broad said.“The passengers were held inan airlock at the airport while advice was sought on what action to take.“Ultimately the call wasmade to allow the passengers to disembark and go home. They were not given PPE, they were not health checkedand they were not required to quarantine.“It is crucial to note thatthis incident occurred after the declaration of a Public Health Emergency andafter the Federal Government mandated that international arrivals self-isolatefor 14 days.“Tasmanians deserve to knowwhy the government failed to trust the instincts of Biosecurity Tasmania staffon the frontline.“Government secrecy over these alarming chain ofevents is appalling and no one is taking responsibility with multiple Ministerspassing the buck.“This outbreak claimed the lives of 13 Tasmanians and the government owes it to them to be open and transparent so we can learn from this and prevent it happening again.”Shane Broad MPShadow Minister for Primary Industries /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don't put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:airport, biosecurity, coronavirus, covid-19, Emergency, Federal, federal government, Government, health, incident, Minister, Outbreak, public health, Tasmania, Tasmanian Labor, Tassie, West Coastlast_img

‘dark day’ as Qantas rejects workers competitive bid for their jobs

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first_img‘dark day’ as Qantas rejects workers competitive bid for their jobs Qantas has dealt a shocking blow to its 2,000 baggage, ramp and cleaning workers, rejecting a competitive bid submitted with the help of EY which found millions of dollars in savings.Workers at 10 airports including Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Perth, Adelaide, Darwin, Cairns, Townsville, Alice Springs and Canberra will lose their jobs, which will now be outsourced to workers on less wages and conditions.TWU National Secretary said workers were devastated to hear Qantas has rejected their bid for their jobs.“This is a dark day as Qantas management rejects a thorough and competitive bid by its highly skilled and dedicated workers to keep their own jobs. Qantas workers have worked hard over recent months with EY to find millions of dollars in cost savings and efficiencies. EY advised us our bid was competitive in comparison to other contractors. To reject its own workers like this is spiteful and will hurt the airline deeply,” he said.“Qantas has spent hundreds of millions in training these workers up over decades to achieve high standards and the idea of pushing them out the door to replace them with less trained workers on lower conditions is sickening. Families across Australia are now facing a grim Christmas where the future lies at the end of a centrelink queue,” he said.“To suggest this bid and its cost savings was ‘theoretical’ is an absolute insult to the time and effort which has been put in by workers. The reference to theoretical was the theoretical Qantas flying time schedule which all bids were based on,” Kaine said.“Workers are angry at the Federal Government’s lack of intervention. It continues to pump millions of dollars into Qantas through wage supports and other financial assistance with no conditions attached. There is no benefit to the Australian community when taxpayers spend billions only to result in workers in good jobs being thrown on the scrap heap,” he added.Jetstar’s ground operations has already been mostly outsourced to Swissport, a scandal-ridden ground handler which was exposed over workers sleeping at the airports. Swissport is back in the Fair Work Commission in an attempt to get approval for its latest substandard enterprise agreement which the Commission has already ruled does not meet minimum standards. The Fair Work Commission confirmed Swissport has been underpaying its workers for years. Swissport has also been exposed over lax standards on safety, service and security.The Federal Government has given over a billion dollars to the aviation industry, including over a $800 million to Qantas, since the pandemic hit, with no conditions attached on retaining jobs or capping CEO salaries.Qantas revealed in its annual report recently it is paying its senior executives millions of dollars. When Qantas announced last year its CEO received $24 million pay package he was the highest paid CEO in Australia and the highest paid airline executive in the world.On Friday, sick Qantas workers were left devastated after the airline’s refusal to allow them to use the leave they built up over years was backed by the Federal Court. Qantas was found by the Federal Court previously to be misusing Jobkeeper, refusing to pay workers for the overtime and weekends they have worked.The Senate recently passed a motion setting up an inquiry into the future of the aviation industry. It is expected to look at Government and industry failings to date and set out recommendations for support into the future. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don't put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Alice Springs, Australian, Brisbane, Cairns, Commission, community, enterprise agreement, Fair Work Commission, Federal, federal court, federal government, Government, Melbourne, Perth, Sydney, Townsville, Transport Workers' Unionlast_img

How The Vancouver Clinic became Clark County’s leader in COVID-19 testing

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first_imgHow The Vancouver Clinic became Clark County’s leader in COVID-19 testingPosted by Chris BrownDate: Monday, December 7, 2020in: Newsshare 0 The provider could soon ramp up to nearly 10,000 tests per week using a new PCR testing platformVANCOUVER — It was the image very early in the pandemic that had everyone cringing.A patient, head tilted far back, winces as a nurse clad head-to-toe in protective gear shoves an obscenely long cotton swab deep, deep into the nose.Esther Tsai, Chi Tran, Ana Sacramento, and Diep Bui are working through a list of over 600 COVID-19 tests. The 600 tests are a mixture of symptomatic patients, exposed patients, pre-procedure testing, first responders, and high-risk individuals. Photo courtesy The Vancouver ClinicEsther Tsai, Chi Tran, Ana Sacramento, and Diep Bui are working through a list of over 600 COVID-19 tests. The 600 tests are a mixture of symptomatic patients, exposed patients, pre-procedure testing, first responders, and high-risk individuals. Photo courtesy The Vancouver ClinicAs unpleasant as that scene was, public health officials will say it happened far, far too infrequently early in the pandemic to be of much use in actually mitigating the spread of the virus that causes COVID-19.Even as the virus spread around the globe, filling up hospitals in Italy, Spain and New York, health providers struggled to get their hands on supplies to do much testing, and laboratories worked around the clock to increase their ability to analyze the tests they were receiving.Things have vastly improved since then, with the United States now averaging nearly 1.9 million daily COVID-19 tests, according to the Covid Tracking Project, more than doubling since July.Diep Bui is prepping her workstation to begin testing. Each employee is able to result out up to 282 COVID-19 tests per day. Photo courtesy The Vancouver ClinicDiep Bui is prepping her workstation to begin testing. Each employee is able to result out up to 282 COVID-19 tests per day. Photo courtesy The Vancouver ClinicIn Clark County, testing numbers rose to over 7,000 a week in early October, before dropping to fewer than 5,000 later that month, then climbing back to 7,509 for the week of Nov. 8.That number could climb much higher by the end of the year, thanks to a new testing platform obtained by The Vancouver Clinic.Despite accounting for around a third of the Clark County health provider market, The Vancouver Clinic was responsible for nearly 90 percent of the COVID-19 testing early in the pandemic, due largely to their aggressiveness in acquiring point-of-care rapid testing machines made by Abbott, along with a BD Max PCR testing system by BD Molecular Diagnostics.Those machines, however, were plagued by two main problems. The Abbott machines, which look for antigens in the blood, are quick, but also more prone to false positives. The BD Max machines required a proprietary reagent (the fluid which preserves the specimen), and keeping enough supply proved difficult.Jon Wilson, lab administrator with The Vancouver Clinic. Photo courtesy The Vancouver ClinicJon Wilson, lab administrator with The Vancouver Clinic. Photo courtesy The Vancouver Clinic“Throughout this whole pandemic for the past year, we’ve really been playing almost whack-a-mole with which problems are we going to solve this week,” says Jon Wilson, lab administrator for The Vancouver Clinic. “If you have the machine but then you can’t get the reagents necessary to do the test, it doesn’t do any good,” adds Chief Medical Officer Dr. Alfred Seekamp. Which is why The Vancouver Clinic made the decision to invest in a new testing platform, the TaqPath, by ThermoFisher Scientific, uses a generic reagent, making that much less of an issue.Dr. Alfred Seekamp, chief medical officer for The Vancouver Clinic. Photo courtesy The Vancouver ClinicDr. Alfred Seekamp, chief medical officer for The Vancouver Clinic. Photo courtesy The Vancouver ClinicThat doesn’t mean everything has gone smoothly, however.“Plastics, your pipette tips, as well as some of the swabs and collection devices now seem to be the barrier,” says Wilson.Hiring has also been difficult, given the exacting qualifications required to run the testing equipment. Still, once those problems are ironed out and everything is fully operational, Seekamp says they expect The Vancouver Clinic alone could run nearly 10,000 tests a week.“When you have more testing available, you’re able to make the interventions sooner, whether that be quarantining or other methods,” says Seekamp. “So I think from a public health perspective, more widespread testing would be a benefit for our community.”But having more testing isn’t of much use if it can’t be relied on.Recently, greater scrutiny has been given to how PCR tests are run, especially focused on the CT Value, otherwise known as the threshold cycles. That represents how many cycles a test sample is run in order to eliminate “noise” or background signals and determine if there is enough of the virus’ genetic material to generate a positive result.Too few cycles, and the test results can be highly unreliable. Too many, and there is concern that non-consequential amounts of the virus could trigger either a false positive, or else a positive result for someone who is not, in fact, contagious.“The CT value for this instrument is up to 37 for it to be considered a positive,” says Wilson, “which is a really good indication that it’s accurate.”“It’s more specific and it’s more sensitive,” adds Seekamp, “so we’re picking up more true positive cases of COVID-19.”Ana Sacramento manually pipettes specimens into a 96 well plate. On the ThermoFisher TaqPath system, tests are run in batches of 94 patients. A negative and positive quality control test is included in each run to ensure accurate results. Photo courtesy The Vancouver ClinicAna Sacramento manually pipettes specimens into a 96 well plate. On the ThermoFisher TaqPath system, tests are run in batches of 94 patients. A negative and positive quality control test is included in each run to ensure accurate results. Photo courtesy The Vancouver ClinicThat greater sensitivity is also accomplished by the use of molecular “markers” to sniff out signs of the virus.“Having three molecular markers does give us a lot of confidence that this is a good test,” Wilson says. “As well as independent research studies that have shown that this matches up really well with other platforms.”Each test is also accompanied by a known negative and positive sample as controls, to make sure the machine is operating correctly.Greater testing availability, said Seekamp and Wilson, could help public health officials and healthcare providers to do more frequent testing of people on the front lines of the pandemic, or people who are in contact with high risk populations. It could also be used for people needing to travel out of state, or once they return.While the TeqPath platform will become their primary system for testing, Seekamp says the BD Max and Abbott machines are still useful, since they can take advantage of different supply chains.“We have been able to kind of hedge our bets as a community,” he says, “to supply testing where it’s needed the most.”That capacity, Seekamp adds, will likely be needed for quite some time yet.“Until there’s really widespread immunity, either natural or from a vaccine, we’re going to continue to need to use COVID testing as part of our armamentarium,” he says.While The Vancouver Clinic still accounts for around 60 percent of the COVID-19 testing done in Clark County, Seekamp says he’s been impressed to see how the other hospitals, including PeaceHealth Southwest and Legacy Salmon Creek, have banded together to tackle the pandemic.“We always try to look for silver linings in a pandemic,” he says, “and I think that one of them is that we have developed a very close working relationship that will endure and continue after COVID-19 is a distant memory.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textTags:Clark CountyCovid-19LatestVancouvershare 0 Previous : VIDEO: Christmas comes early and so do the trees in Clark County Next : County, city and Vancouver Housing Authority to open non-congregate shelter in VancouverAdvertisementThis is placeholder textlast_img

CU-Boulder To Host Engineering Career Day For Women March 6

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first_img Published: Feb. 12, 2004 Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Women interested in exploring career opportunities in engineering and technology are invited to register for the University of Colorado at Boulder's annual "Engineering Career Day for Women" on Saturday, March 6. The all-day program will be held on the Boulder campus from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and will introduce high school and community college students to the field of engineering through hands-on activities. Participants also will meet women who study and work in the field of engineering, and will tour the CU-Boulder campus with college students. Engineering Career Day for Women is presented by the Women in Engineering Program. Most sessions will be held in the Engineering Center, including the Integrated Teaching and Learning Laboratory, the college's state-of-the-art experiential learning facility, and the new Discovery Learning Center. Attendees will meet current students and professional engineers, and will participate in demonstrations and activities throughout the college. Separate informational sessions will be offered for parents, teachers and counselors who want to learn what CU-Boulder has to offer and how to encourage young women to pursue engineering as a career. Cost of the program is $10 per person and includes materials, a continental breakfast and lunch. Registration is requested by Feb. 21. For more information and registration, go to www.colorado.edu/engineering or call (303) 492-0083.last_img

CU-Boulder Announces 2005 Equity And Excellence Awards

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first_imgShare Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail The Office of Diversity and Equity at the University of Colorado at Boulder has awarded 2005 Equity and Excellence Awards to five faculty, staff and students. Associate Professor Ruben Donato of the School of Education received the faculty award. Carol Miyagishima, director of the Chancellor's Leadership Residential Academic Program and Ethnic Living and Learning Community, received the staff award. They were chosen for their commitment to academic excellence, cultural pluralism and diversity in the university community. Students are selected for their demonstration of outstanding service to the university community and within multiculturally diverse communities on campus, as well as a commitment to academic excellence. Winners of the student awards were Hillary Jorgensen, a senior majoring in English; Michelle Miles, doctoral candidate in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication; and Shengwang Du, doctoral candidate in physics. Awardees were honored at the 20th Annual Equity and Excellence Graduation Celebration and Awards Banquet on April 28. Each winner received a certificate and a $200 award. A request for Equity and Excellence Award nominations is announced each spring and a committee of former recipients recommends the awardees. In addition to the Equity and Excellence Awards, Christine Yoshinaga-Itano, associate vice chancellor of diversity and equity, received the outstanding leadership award. Albert Ramirez, former administrator and retired faculty member in the psychology and ethnic studies departments, received a special honor for establishing the banquet 20 years ago. Published: May 3, 2005 last_img

PhET simulations keep students engaged while learning science remotely

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first_imgSince the COVID-19 pandemic began and schools were forced to shift to remote learning, PhET—a University of Colorado Boulder STEM (or science, technology, engineering and mathematics) education project—has seen the usage of its free, interactive science simulations increase substantially across the globe, with use in hard-hit countries like Italy and France increasing by 500%.“As schools around the world switch to remote learning, many teachers, students and parents who might not have used any science or math simulations before are now discovering and using PhET’s library of simulations for the first time,” said Kathy Perkins, director of PhET Interactive Simulations. “It’s been a challenging time for everyone involved, and we’re happy we can play a part in providing solutions.”PhET, which originally stood for “Physics Education Technology,” was started in 2002 by Carl Wieman, a former CU Boulder physics professor and one of five Nobel Laureates from the university, when he saw the educational force of physics simulations. While PhET originally focused solely on physics simulations and education, today it is a pioneering science and math educational resource that seeks to improve STEM literacy and accessibility across the globe by covering topics ranging from atoms to algebra. Since its launch, PhET’s simulations, which number over 100, have been translated into 90 languages and used in more than 200 countries and territories. PhET has also begun to work with commercial partners like BrainPOP, Nearpod and Pearson to integrate their simulations into more teaching products. A screenshot of the Projectile Motion simulation depicts a vintage car being shot from a cannon over the likeness of Michelangelo's David. I think one of the simulations’ greatest values during this time is their ability to continue to engage students’ curiosity in science and to enable their exploration of scientific phenomena in ways that are consistent with science practices" High-school student helps science-ed team update its simulations 'Even students studying degrees in computer programming have difficulty doing this from scratch,' PhET Interactive... Read more Published: May 4, 2020 • By Cay Leytham-Powell CU Boulder’s PhET Interactive Simulations are providing critical support to teachers, students and parents during the COVID-19 pandemicAs schools adapt to the new normal of teaching remotely, teachers—particularly science teachers—need innovative approaches to keep students engaged. And one way they are finding that is through PhET Interactive Simulations. PhET Interactive Simulations recognized for innovation in STEM education CU Boulder’s PhET Interactive Simulations is one of 15 finalists for the prestigious WISE Award, which recognizes innovative educational projects that address challenges and bring transformative societal change. Read more “I think one of the simulations’ greatest values during this time is their ability to continue to engage students’ curiosity in science and to enable their exploration of scientific phenomena in ways that are consistent with science practices,” said Perkins.“How do you explore something? What questions do you ask? What evidence do you collect? How do you present that evidence? How do you explain things? Giving them something that provides that hands-on type of experimentation but in a situation where a teacher cannot provide that hands-on experience.”Jacqui Hayes, an education technology consultant that works with PhET, agrees:“For many years, PhET has been pushing the boundaries of digital science education. It’s a really tough challenge,” she says.“All of a sudden, teachers no longer have their classroom and have to rely on digital activities. Through this experience, I think people have realized just how hard it is to create true inquiry activities in the digital environment, and this is part of the reason why even more people are turning to PhET than ever before. This definitely is the best way we know to teach science online.”And Perkins is hopeful that even beyond the pandemic, the increased demand will continue:“Once teachers have returned to the classroom, we hope that they continue to use PhET simulations and see the value of incorporating digital science inquiry into their teaching.”Learn more about online educational resources offered by the University of Colorado Boulder to the community, like PhET Interactive Simulations, on the Community Outreach and Engagement Programs website.center_img Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Related Articles Striving to help women feel they belong in physics By creating a sense of belonging for women in physics, the University of Colorado Boulder is helping female students succeed, experts in the field say. Read more Before the pandemic, Perkins says that teachers would often use a combination of PhET simulations, lab equipment, demonstrations and classroom activities. Without access to their classrooms, though, teachers are turning to PhET or other online simulations as a key resource that can continue to provide opportunities for students to engage in science or math.And this has translated into an increase in usage. Since the outbreak began, PhET has seen over 4 million uses every week and increases in usage across Europe. While in the United States, where many teachers already used PhET simulations during classroom instruction, the online software has allowed teachers to continue with similar lessons now with students at home.“The simulations that PhET offers are an excellent way to make sure that students can get the lab hours that they need. If I were to do some other sort of lab that required certain materials, I can’t guarantee that all of the students in their home might have all of those materials. … To have the online simulation with everything they need ready to go is amazing,” said Andrew Wallace, a physics teacher at World View High School in the Bronx, an area hard hit by the coronavirus pandemic. “PhET really streamlines everything. Right now, everybody just has such high stress levels, and any way that we can reduce that stress is worth it, so having everything ready to go is great at reducing that stress.”In response to the immediate needs of teachers and commercial partners since the pandemic began, PhET has expanded their capabilities. They’ve begun creating lessons for remote learning, adding Google Doc capability to their lesson database, sharing teacher tips for using PhET with remote lessons, releasing prototype simulations, and introducing new technology to improve ease of access to their older simulations. Tags:PhET Interactive SimulationsSTEM educationlast_img

Turkcell $4.2B lawsuit against MTN revived

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first_imgHome Turkcell $4.2B lawsuit against MTN revived AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 02 JUN 2017 MTNTurkcell Previous ArticlePolish operator P4 set for July IPO – reportNext ArticleMoto updates Z Play, adds new Mods MTN committed to Syria exit A lawsuit filed by Turkcell seeking $4.2 billion in damages from South African operator MTN in 2013 for committing “unlawful acts” during the tender process for a licence in Iran will finally be examined by a high court in Johannesburg.Turkcell sued MTN for the amount, which covers the profits plus interest it believes it would have made if Iran’s first private mobile phone licence had not been taken away from it.“South African [sic] high court rejected [the] defendant’s procedural objections. Thereby, after a long period of time, merits of the case will now be examined,” Turkcell said in a statement.In 2013, the operator said it was awarded Iran’s first private mobile phone licence in 2004, but was “unlawfully” prevented from receiving it, due to “MTN’s illegal acts, including bribery and corruption”.The litigation was delayed until a South African high court judge allowed the case to go to trial.“We believe we have a very strong claim… Turkcell will be seeking the earliest possible trial date, and looks forward to vindicating its claims before the South African courts,” Financial Times (FT) quoted Serhat Demir, Turkcell’s EVP for legal and regulatory affairs, as saying.Meanwhile MTN “continues to believe that there is no legal merit to Turkcell’s claim and will accordingly oppose it,” FT quoted an MTN company representative as saying. This is the same statement it made in 2013.Sanctions easedMTN posted its first ever annual loss in March although its business in Iran is doing well and is its second-biggest subscriber base.In October 2016, the company revealed it was accelerating the appointment of new CEO Rob Shuter, moving his start date up to 13 March 2017 from the original 1 July target. MTN was seeking to exit a turbulent period following a parliamentary investigation in Nigeria into whether it unlawfully repatriated $14 billion in funds between 2006 and 2016.The company also said repatriation of funds from MTN Irancell to MTN Group had commenced. The group, which holds a 49 per cent stake in the Iranian operator, previously said easing of Iranian sanctions would enable it to receive about $1 billion in accumulated dividends and a loan repayment from its Iranian unit. Tags MTN eyes $6B valuation for money unit Saleha Riaz Related Saleha joined Mobile World Live in October 2014 as a reporter and works across all e-newsletters - creating content, writing blogs and reports as well as conducting feature interviews...More Read more Author MTN expects fintech spin-off within a yearlast_img

EU backtracks on digital tax

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first_img Related European CommissionEuropean Union Saleha joined Mobile World Live in October 2014 as a reporter and works across all e-newsletters - creating content, writing blogs and reports as well as conducting feature interviews...More Read more Deutsche Telekom loses appeal of Slovak fine Tags Previous Article4YFN Awards Finalist: CarfitNext ArticleInnovation City: Connected Women EC details AI regulation plan The European Union (EU) was expected to abandon efforts to create a digital tax for the bloc, instead focusing on a global tax system for tech companies, Reuters reported.Its original plan would have required large companies in the EU to pay a 3 per cent levy on revenue generated from the sale of user data, online marketplaces and targeted advertising. However, it was blocked by the Republic of Ireland and Scandinavian countries, which feared a loss of revenue and political backlash.“A number of delegations continue to have fundamental objections,” the Romanian presidency of the EU wrote in a document prepared ahead of a meeting of EU finance ministers meeting on 12 March, which was seen by Reuters.Countries including France, Italy and Spain, which were in favour of the tax, have introduced it on a national level.The EU’s decision is likely to be welcomed by tech giants including Google and Facebook, Reuters stated.Meanwhile EU ministers are expected to agree to keep working on a global tax reform prepared by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development.Earlier this week the Council of the European Union primed rules to scrutinise direct investments, including takeover proposals from countries outside the region on the grounds of security or public order. Subscribe to our daily newsletter Back AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 07 MAR 2019 EU tipped to court India in 5G security standards effort Home EU backtracks on digital tax Author Saleha Riaz last_img

County Dumps Plan to Build New Jail in Columbia Falls

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first_img Stay Connected with the Daily Roundup. Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of the Beacon delivered every day to your inbox. Email The Flathead County Commission has dumped a plan to build a new jail in Columbia Falls after overwhelming public opposition from local residents against the proposal.On Oct. 10, the commission voted unanimously not to purchase from Weyerhaeuser 24 acres of land and a 35,000-square-foot office building along 12th Avenue West in Columbia Falls. The county had proposed using the office building as the new sheriff’s office and building the new jail next to it.The decision not to move forward with a buy/sell agreement for the piece of land came after a pair of public meetings during which many Columbia Falls residents voiced their displeasure with a proposal to put the new jail in their town.Flathead County has been grappling with an overcrowded jail for a number of years. The current facility in Kalispell was built in 1984 to hold about 60 people and has had to be expanded numerous times due to crowding. After a recent renovation, it can now hold 164 inmates, but Sheriff Chuck Curry said soon that will not be enough. The county is looking to build a new 260-bed jail in the coming years.During a public meeting on Sept. 25 at the Columbia Falls Junior High School, no member of the public spoke in favor of the plan, although many agreed a new jail needs to be built somewhere. Local residents were especially concerned about the close proximity to a number of schools, residential neighborhoods and senior living facilities. Others worried that a jail would slow development in the community, and two real estate agents said that some people have stopped looking at homes in Columbia Falls ever since the commission floated the idea of building a jail in town.“I am for a new jail,” said Columbia Falls resident Cameron Darby. “I just don’t want it in my town.”County Administrator Mike Pence said the commissioners took the opinions of all stakeholders into consideration when determining if they would move forward with the proposal. Pence said the commission also thanked Weyerhaeuser for their work in negotiating the deal.The decision to not purchase the land means Flathead County is once again looking for a site to build a new jail. The county commission has looked at a number of potential jail sites in in recent months, including 40 acres of land off Willow Glen Drive south of Kalispell and 14 acres of land near the old Kalispell Feed and Grain facility near U.S. Highway 93. Last year, the county nearly purchased the old Wal-Mart in Evergreen to convert it into a jail, but another buyer offered more money for the property.last_img